Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a data frame holding information on options like this

> chData
myIdx strike_price       date     exdate cp_flag strike_price    return
1 8355342       605000 1996-04-02 1996-05-18       P       605000  0.002340
2 8355433       605000 1996-04-02 1996-05-18       C       605000  0.002340
3 8356541       605000 1996-04-09 1996-05-18       P       605000 -0.003182
4 8356629       605000 1996-04-09 1996-05-18       C       605000 -0.003182
5 8358033       605000 1996-04-16 1996-05-18       P       605000  0.003907
6 8358119       605000 1996-04-16 1996-05-18       C       605000  0.003907
7 8359391       605000 1996-04-23 1996-05-18       P       605000  0.005695

where cp_flag means that a certain option is either a call or a put. What is a way to make sure that for each date, there is a both a call and a put, and drop the rows for which this does not exist? I can do it with a for loop, but is there a more clever way?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Get the dates that have P's and those that have C's, and use intersect to find the dates that have both.

keep_dates <- with(x, intersect(date[cp_flag=='P'], date[cp_flag=='C']) )
# "1996-04-02" "1996-04-09" "1996-04-16"

Keep only the rows that have dates appearing in keep_dates.

x[ x$date %in% keep_dates, ]
#   myIdx strike_price       date     exdate cp_flag strike_price.1
# 8355342       605000 1996-04-02 1996-05-18       P         605000
# 8355433       605000 1996-04-02 1996-05-18       C         605000
# 8356541       605000 1996-04-09 1996-05-18       P         605000
# 8356629       605000 1996-04-09 1996-05-18       C         605000
# 8358033       605000 1996-04-16 1996-05-18       P         605000
# 8358119       605000 1996-04-16 1996-05-18       C         605000
share|improve this answer
    
Elegant! I like this one a lot. –  Vince Aug 6 '10 at 5:48

Using the plyr package:

> ddply(chData, "date", function(x) if(all(c("P","C") %in% x$cp_flag)) x)
    myIdx strike_price       date     exdate cp_flag strike_price.1    return
1 8355342       605000 1996-04-02 1996-05-18       P         605000  0.002340
2 8355433       605000 1996-04-02 1996-05-18       C         605000  0.002340
3 8356541       605000 1996-04-09 1996-05-18       P         605000 -0.003182
4 8356629       605000 1996-04-09 1996-05-18       C         605000 -0.003182
5 8358033       605000 1996-04-16 1996-05-18       P         605000  0.003907
6 8358119       605000 1996-04-16 1996-05-18       C         605000  0.003907
share|improve this answer
    
This language keeps getting core cryptic and non-intuitive the more I read about it. What's a ddply plyr? –  Karl Aug 6 '10 at 4:27
    
@Karl, that's a package, not the "core" language. –  Vince Aug 6 '10 at 4:27
    
It just looks cryptic because of the function in there. plyr and its functions really are wonderful. –  JoFrhwld Aug 6 '10 at 5:01

Here's a reshape approach.

library(reshape)
#Add a dummy value
df$value <- 1
check <- cast(df, myIdx + strike_price + date + exdate + strike_price + return ~ cp_flag)

#take stock of what just happened
summary(check)

#use only complete cases. If you have NAs elsewhere, this will knock out those obs too
check <- check[complete.cases(check),]

#back to original form
df.clean <- melt(check, id = 1:6)
share|improve this answer

Here's one way using split and lapply:

> tmp <- lapply(split(d, list(d$date)), function(x) if(all(c('P', 'C') %in% x[, 5])) x)
> do.call(rbind, tmp)
             myIdx strike_price       date     exdate cp_flag strike_price    return
1996-05-18.1 8355342       605000 1996-04-02 1996-05-18       P       605000  0.002340
1996-05-18.2 8355433       605000 1996-04-02 1996-05-18       C       605000  0.002340
1996-05-18.3 8356541       605000 1996-04-09 1996-05-18       P       605000 -0.003182
1996-05-18.4 8356629       605000 1996-04-09 1996-05-18       C       605000 -0.003182
1996-05-18.5 8358033       605000 1996-04-16 1996-05-18       P       605000  0.003907
1996-05-18.6 8358119       605000 1996-04-16 1996-05-18       C       605000  0.003907
1996-05-18.7 8359391       605000 1996-04-23 1996-05-18       P       605000  0.005695

Edit: Here's the full version implied by my last answer. I tend to think in base functions rather than plyr or reshape... but these answers seem good too.

share|improve this answer
    
I must be taking crazy pills... lapply + split is better done with just tapply. But wch's solution seems much cleaner. –  Vince Aug 6 '10 at 7:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.