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I need to find whether a number is divisible by 3 without using %, / or *. The hint given was to use atoi() function. Any idea how to do it?

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40  
This is kind of a dumb interview question isn't it? Doesn't really test your programming knowledge, but rather whether or not you know obscure properties about numbers... –  Mark Aug 6 '10 at 7:04
4  
Another of those silly interview questions... this has nothing to do with programming skill in any way. It would just prove that you (maybe by chance) know that the sum of digits has to be divisible by 3 (which I didn't know/remember, honestly ;) ). –  Olli Aug 6 '10 at 7:05
8  
Well could also be an examn question from my universtity professor. That guy never worked on real projects but thought that such questions would actualy reflect the real world. ha. –  Yves M. Aug 6 '10 at 7:14
14  
I tried to imagine an episode of MacGuyver where he would need this snippet of knowledge, but it defies even that. –  detly Aug 6 '10 at 7:29
20  
What people seem to be missing is that you don't need to know any obscure properties of numbers in order to solve this problem. What you should know, if you call yourself a computer scientist, is this: given any language missing some set of mathematical operators, but which is nonetheless Turing complete, you can reimplement all the missing operators yourself. –  pelotom Aug 7 '10 at 2:04

17 Answers 17

up vote 58 down vote accepted

Subtract 3 until you either

a) hit 0 - number was divisible by 3

b) get a number less than 0 - number wasn't divisible

-- edited version to fix noted problems

while n > 0:
    n -= 3
while n < 0:
    n += 3
return n == 0
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7  
This is not very efficient; it's Θ(n), whereas @tdammers' solution is Θ(log n) –  pelotom Aug 6 '10 at 7:26
2  
tdammers' solution requires the ability to do division which is explicity banned. (You can't split a number into its decimal digits without dividing by 10). –  JeremyP Aug 6 '10 at 8:37
2  
@pelotom: MSalter's answer does division by 16. If you are going to allow bit shifts you might as well re-implement the modulus operation and test thus: `bool isDivisibleBy3 = modUsingShifts(x, 3); –  JeremyP Aug 6 '10 at 9:58
2  
@pelotom, describing this as Θ(n) is rather misleading, this is exponential in the bit length of the number (most algorithms you'll see with this property are also described as exponential, not linear). –  Dimitris Andreou Aug 9 '10 at 0:38
4  
Why worry about efficiency when what we're discussing is a silly interview question? I'd go with most straightforward solution possible. Bit shifts, multiple OR's and all that jazz increase complexity in my book. –  YRH Aug 11 '10 at 8:38

The current answers all focus on decimal digits, when applying the "add all digits and see if that divides by 3". That trick actually works in hex as well; e.g. 0x12 can be divided by 3 because 0x1 + 0x2 = 0x3. And "converting" to hex is a lot easier than converting to decimal.

Pseudo-code:

int reduce(int i) {
  if (i > 0x10)
    return reduce((i >> 4) + (i & 0x0F)); // Reduces 0x102 to 0x12 to 0x3.
  else
   return i; // Done.
}
bool isDiv3(int i) {
  i = reduce(i);
  return i==0 || i==3 || i==6 || i==9 || i==0xC || i == 0xF;
}

[edit] Inspired by R, a faster version (O log log N):

int reduce(unsigned i) {
  if (i >= 6)
    return reduce((i >> 2) + (i & 0x03));
  else
   return i; // Done.
}
bool isDiv3(unsigned  i) {
  // Do a few big shifts first before recursing.
  i = (i >> 16) + (i & 0xFFFF);
  i = (i >> 8) + (i & 0xFF);
  i = (i >> 4) + (i & 0xF);
  // Because of additive overflow, it's possible that i > 0x10 here. No big deal.
  i = reduce(i);
  return i==0 || i==3;
}
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7  
BTW, in base-N the trick works for all factors of (N-1). E.g. in hex it also works for 5 ("dividable by 5" is another similar interview question) –  MSalters Aug 6 '10 at 9:28
    
Doesn't work for negatives, but adding a condition to isDiv3 would be easy. –  Forrest Voight Aug 8 '10 at 5:38
    
+1 for pointing out that you can do this with hex. I hadn't realized that and it's really useful. Thanks to @MSalters too for mentioning how it extends to other values of N; it might be useful with other power-of-2 values of N with more factors. –  R.. Aug 11 '10 at 8:03
2  
Actually since 3=4-1, doing this in base 4 might be cleaner. At least you'd eliminate all the || mess at the end. –  R.. Aug 11 '10 at 8:05
    
shouldn't that be: return i instead of return in? please explain if i'm wrong –  Istvan Chung Aug 11 '10 at 15:45

Split the number into digits. Add the digits together. Repeat until you have only one digit left. If that digit is 3, 6, or 9, the number is divisible by 3. (And don't forget to handle 0 as a special case).

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6  
there could be a violation of requirements using this process that is not to use %,/,* to get digits from number we need to use them. better to convert entire number into string and get each character and covert it into again number and add them and find the reslut. –  srinivas Aug 6 '10 at 7:06
1  
"to get digits from number we need to use them" no, it is not true –  Dennis Cheung Aug 6 '10 at 7:15
    
That's what I was trying to get at. You convert the number into a string, split it into digits, and treat each digit as a number in the 0 to 9 range. –  tdammers Aug 6 '10 at 7:15
3  
So, how do you convert the number into a decimal number in a string without division? –  janm Aug 6 '10 at 7:31
    
Don't forget about 0. –  Jakub Šturc Aug 6 '10 at 8:10

While the technique of converting to a string and then adding the decimal digits together is elegant, it either requires division or is inefficient in the conversion-to-a-string step. Is there a way to apply the idea directly to a binary number, without first converting to a string of decimal digits?

It turns out, there is:

Given a binary number, the sum of its odd bits minus the sum of its even bits is divisible by 3 iff the original number was divisible by 3.

As an example: take the number 3726, which is divisible by 3. In binary, this is 111010001110. So we take the odd digits, starting from the right and moving left, which are [1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1]; the sum of these is 5. The even bits are [0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1]; the sum of these is 2. 5 - 2 = 3, from which we can conclude that the original number is divisible by 3.

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3  
This (summing of odd and even digits/bits) is again a special case of a general trick, checking in base N whether a number can be divided by (N+1). –  MSalters Aug 16 '10 at 11:23
    
@MSalters: Can you give some reference to the proof of this statement ? –  user1599964 Sep 13 '13 at 6:45
    
@user1599964: In base N, (N+1) is written as 11. So, the property holds for 11 * 1. If and only if the property holds for number x, it also holds for x+11. That's trivial if there's no overflow (e.g. 100 + 11 = 111, for any base). With an overflow, the overflow is from an odd digit to an even digit or from an even digit to an odd digit, which preserves the balance. Overflows deducts N from the overflowing digit and adds +1 to the higher digit. Since we take the difference of odd and even digit sums, overflow changes the difference by N+1 which doesn't affect divisibility by N+1. –  MSalters Sep 13 '13 at 9:07

The interview question essentially asks you to come up with (or have already known) the divisibility rule shorthand with 3 as the divisor.

One of the divisibility rule for 3 is as follows:

Take any number and add together each digit in the number. Then take that sum and determine if it is divisible by 3 (repeating the same procedure as necessary). If the final number is divisible by 3, then the original number is divisible by 3.

Example:

16,499,205,854,376
=> 1+6+4+9+9+2+0+5+8+5+4+3+7+6 sums to 69
=> 6 + 9 = 15 => 1 + 5 = 6, which is clearly divisible by 3.

See also

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Given a number x. Convert x to a string. Parse the string character by character. Convert each parsed character to a number (using atoi()) and add up all these numbers into a new number y. Repeat the process until your final resultant number is one digit long. If that one digit is either 3,6 or 9, the origional number x is divisible by 3.

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this is the procedure that wont user the operators /,% or *. Voted up.. Cheers.. :) –  srinivas Aug 6 '10 at 7:03
1  
To convert a single character to a number you don't need to use atoi - simply subtract '0' from the character (its ASCII code). –  smichak Aug 6 '10 at 7:05
    
Give me an algorithm to convert a number into a decimal string without doing division. –  JeremyP Aug 6 '10 at 8:39
2  
@JeremyP: divide x y = if x < y then 0 else 1 + divide (x - y) y There, now I can use division, because I implemented it in terms of addition and subtraction. It's inefficient, but correct. Are you going to argue that addition and subtraction shouldn't be allowed now? –  pelotom Aug 6 '10 at 10:36
    
@pelotom: No, the point is that the question is flawed. Either it bans any "handed to you on a plate" form of division in which you have to reimplement it using repeated subtraction or it merely bans the use of the / and % symbols in which case it is quite easy to get round. Or perhaps it isn't flawed and it is designed to provoke these kinds of discussions. –  JeremyP Aug 7 '10 at 11:22

A number divisible by 3, iirc has a characteristic that the sum of its digit is divisible by 3. For example,

12 -> 1 + 2 = 3
144 -> 1 + 4 + 4 = 9
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You didn't tag this C, but since you mentioned atoi, I'm going to give a C solution:

int isdiv3(int x)
{
    div_t d = div(x, 3);
    return !d.rem;
}
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My solution in Java only works for 32-bit unsigned ints.

static boolean isDivisibleBy3(int n) {
  int x = n;
  x = (x >>> 16) + (x & 0xffff); // max 0x0001fffe
  x = (x >>> 8) + (x & 0x00ff); // max 0x02fd
  x = (x >>> 4) + (x & 0x000f); // max 0x003d (for 0x02ef)
  x = (x >>> 4) + (x & 0x000f); // max 0x0011 (for 0x002f)
  return ((011111111111 >> x) & 1) != 0;
}

It first reduces the number down to a number less than 32. The last step checks for divisibility by shifting the mask the appropriate number of times to the right.

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A number is divisible by 3 if all the digits in the number when added gives a result 3, 6 or 9. For example 3693 is divisible by 3 as 3+6+9+3 = 21 and 2+1=3 and 3 is divisible by 3.

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bool isDiv3(unsigned int n)
{
    unsigned int n_div_3 =
        n * (unsigned int) 0xaaaaaaab;
    return (n_div_3 < 0x55555556);//<=>n_div_3 <= 0x55555555

/*
because 3 * 0xaaaaaaab == 0x200000001 and
 (uint32_t) 0x200000001 == 1
*/
}

bool isDiv5(unsigned int n)
{
    unsigned int n_div_5 =
        i * (unsigned int) 0xcccccccd;
    return (n_div_5 < 0x33333334);//<=>n_div_5 <= 0x33333333

/*
because 5 * 0xcccccccd == 0x4 0000 0001 and
 (uint32_t) 0x400000001 == 1
*/
}

Following the same rule, to obtain the result of divisibility test by 'n', we can : multiply the number by 0x1 0000 0000 - (1/n)*0xFFFFFFFF compare to (1/n) * 0xFFFFFFFF

The counterpart is that for some values, the test won't be able to return a correct result for all the 32bit numbers you want to test, for example, with divisibility by 7 :

we got 0x100000000- (1/n)*0xFFFFFFFF = 0xDB6DB6DC and 7 * 0xDB6DB6DC = 0x6 0000 0004, We will only test one quarter of the values, but we can certainly avoid that with substractions.

Other examples :

11 * 0xE8BA2E8C = A0000 0004, one quarter of the values

17 * 0xF0F0F0F1 = 10 0000 0000 1 comparing to 0xF0F0F0F Every values !

Etc., we can even test every numbers by combining natural numbers between them.

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well a number is divisible by 3 if all the sum of digits of the number are divisible by 3. so you could get each digit as a substring of the input number and then add them up. you then would repeat this process until there is only a single digit result.

if this is 3, 6 or 9 the number is divisable by 3.

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Getting decimal digits is implicitly using division. See the answer using hex for a similar approach that's not cheating. –  R.. Aug 11 '10 at 8:07
    
No I am not cheating. You just convert the int into a string and then you access each character(digit) individually. –  GorillaPatch Aug 11 '10 at 8:48
    
@GorillaPatch int to string conversion uses division –  ST3 Sep 10 '13 at 16:46

C# Solution for Check if a number is divisble by 3

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int num = 33;
            bool flag = false;

            while (true)
            {
                num = num - 7;
                if (num == 0)
                {
                    flag = true;
                    break;
                }
                else if (num < 0)
                {
                    break;
                }
                else
                {
                    flag = false;
                }
            }

            if (flag)
                Console.WriteLine("Divisible by 3");
            else
                Console.WriteLine("Not Divisible by 3");

            Console.ReadLine();

        }

    }
}
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Here is your optimized solution that every one sould know.................

Source: http://www.geeksforgeeks.org/archives/511

Program:

#include<stdio.h>


int isMultiple(int n)
{
    int o_count = 0;
    int e_count = 0;


    if(n < 0)  
           n = -n;
    if(n == 0) 
           return 1;
    if(n == 1)
           return 0;

    while(n)
    {

        if(n & 1)
           o_count++;
        n = n>>1;


        if(n & 1)
            e_count++;
        n = n>>1;
    }

     return isMultiple(abs(o_count - e_count));
}


int main()
{
    int num = 23;
    if (isMultiple(num))
        printf("multiple of 3");
    else
        printf(" not multiple of 3");

    return 0;
}
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def divisible(a,b):
d = a % b
if d > 0:
    print "Not divisible"
elif d == 0:
    print "Divisible"
else:
    pass

divisible(93,3)

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OP wrote without using %, / or * –  ST3 Oct 10 '13 at 12:35
inline bool divisible3(uint32_t x)  //inline is not a must, because latest compilers always optimize it as inline.
{
    //1431655765 = (2^32 - 1) / 3
    //2863311531 = (2^32) - 1431655765
    return x * 2863311531u <= 1431655765u;
}

On some compilers this is even faster then regular way: x % 3. Read more here.

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In my opinion it is the best answer. –  user2532605 Sep 15 '13 at 5:52

A number is divisible by 3 iff the sum of its digits is divisible by 3. You can use this definition recursively until you are left with a single digit. If the result is 3, 6 or 9, the original number is divisible by 3 otherwise it's not.

Exaple: 33333 => 15 (3+3+3+3+3) => 6 (1+5) so 33333 is divisible by 3.

See Divisibility rules

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