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I have the following json file:

 { "last_modified": {
         "type": "/type/datetime", 
         "value": "2008-04-01T03:28:50.625462" }, 
     "type": { "key": "/type/author" }, 
     "name": "National Research Council. Committee on the Scientific and Technologic Base of Puerto Rico"s Economy.", 
     "key": "/authors/OL2108538A", 
     "revision": 1 }

The name value has a double quote and I only want to replace this double quote with a single quote (not any other double quote). How can I do it?

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I am surprised no one has asked how got his data screwed up in the first place (not escaped properly). Maybe he should fix whatever is giving him this JSON file to escape properly (or do his single quote conversion). –  Adam Gent Apr 13 '12 at 4:41
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7 Answers

If you want to repleace all occurences of a single character, you can also use the command tr, simpler than sed or awk:

   cat myfile.txt | tr \" \'

Notice that both quotes are escaped. If you have other chars than quotes, you just write:

   cat myfile.txt | tr a A

Edit: Note that after the question was edited this answer is no longer valid: it replaces all double quotes, not only the one inside the Name property.

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If you mean just the double quote in 'Rico"s', you can use:

sed "s/Rico\"s/Rico's/"

as in:

pax> echo '{"name": "National Res...rto Rico"s Economy.", "key": "blah"}'
     | sed "s/Rico\"s/Rico's/"
{"name": "National Res...rto Rico's Economy.", "key": "blah"}
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thank you help! but i have a json file , this file have 4 millions json data, may have 10 thousands data like this –  drk Aug 6 '10 at 8:46
1  
@user358347: then you need a parser, not a regular expression engine. –  paxdiablo Aug 6 '10 at 9:44
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Assuming your data is exactly like you showed and the extra double quotes only appear in the name value field:

Update:

I made the script slightly more robust (handling ', ' inside fields).

BEGIN {
    q = "\""
    FS = OFS = q ", " q
}
{
    split($1, arr, ": " q)
    gsub(q, "'", arr[2])
    print arr[1] ": " q arr[2], $2, $3
}

Put this script in a file (say dequote.awk) and run the script with
awk -f dequote.awk input.json > output.json.

Update 2:

Okay, so your input is extremely difficult to process. The only thing other thing I can think of is this:

{
    start = match($0, "\"name\": ") + 8
    stop = match($0, "\", \"key\": ")
    if (start == 8 || stop == 0) {
        print
        next
    }
    pre = substr($0, 1, start)
    post = substr($0, stop)
    name = substr($0, start + 1, stop - start - 1)
    gsub("\"", "'", name)
    print pre name post
}

Explanation: I try to chop the line in three parts:

  1. Up to the first double quote for the "name" value field;
  2. the "name" value field minus the double quotes;
  3. the closing double quote and the rest of the line.

In part 2 I replace all double quotes by single quotes. Then I glue the three parts back together and print them.

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please tell me how to run this script , and how to scanner the json file –  drk Aug 6 '10 at 9:06
    
i tried it , not work , maybe i cut some data: {"last_modified": {"type": "/type/datetime", "value": "2008-04-01T03:28:50.625462"}, "type": {"key": "/type/author"}, "name": "National Research Council. Committee on the Scientific and Technologic Base of Puerto Rico"s Economy.", "key": "/authors/OL2108538A", "revision": 1} –  drk Aug 6 '10 at 10:01
    
the arr[2] have to change it , because the name key maybe at the start, or at the end –  drk Aug 6 '10 at 10:03
    
@drk See my updated version. –  schot Aug 6 '10 at 10:56
    
thanks,but still not work well, so i'm ready change my json data structure. –  drk Aug 6 '10 at 11:43
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awk '{for(i=1;i<=NF;i++) if($i~/name/) { gsub("\042","\047",$(i+1)) }   }1' file
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Adding some other weird error cases to your input

{ "last_modified": {"type": "/type/datetime", "value": "2008-04-01T03:28:50.625462"},
  "type": {"key": "/type/author"},
  "name": "National Research Council. Committee on the Scientific and Technologic Base of Puerto Rico"s Economy.",
  "key": "/authors/OL2108538A",
  "revision": 1,
  "has \" escaped quote": 1,
  "has \" escaped quotes \"": 1,
  "has multiple " internal " quotes": 1,
}

this Perl program that corrects unescaped internal double-quotes using the heuristic that a string's actual closing quote is followed by optional whitespace and either a colon, comma, semicolon, or curly brace

#! /usr/bin/perl -p

s<"(.+?)"(\s*[:,;}])> {
  my($text,$terminator) = ($1,$2);
  $text =~ s/(?<!\\)"/'/g;  # " oh, the irony!
  qq["$text"] . $terminator;
}eg;

produces the following output:

$ ./fixdqs input.json
{ "last_modified": {"type": "/type/datetime", "value": "2008-04-01T03:28:50.625462"},
  "type": {"key": "/type/author"},
  "name": "National Research Council. Committee on the Scientific and Technologic Base of Puerto Rico's Economy.",
  "key": "/authors/OL2108538A",
  "revision": 1,
  "has \" escaped quote": 1,
  "has \" escaped quotes \"": 1,
  "has multiple ' internal ' quotes": 1,
}

Delta from input to output:

$ diff -ub input.json <(./fixdqs input.json)
--- input.json
+++ /dev/fd/63
@@ -1,9 +1,9 @@
 { "last_modified": {"type": "/type/datetime", "value": "2008-04-01T03:28:50.625462"},
   "type": {"key": "/type/author"},
-  "name": "National Research Council. Committee on the Scientific and Technologic Base of Puerto Rico"s Economy.",
+  "name": "National Research Council. Committee on the Scientific and Technologic Base of Puerto Rico's Economy.",
   "key": "/authors/OL2108538A",
   "revision": 1,
   "has \" escaped quote": 1,
   "has \" escaped quotes \"": 1,
-  "has multiple " internal " quotes": 1,
+  "has multiple ' internal ' quotes": 1,
 }
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I think would be better to use sed something like this:

sed 's/"/'/g' your file

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thank you help! i tried it , this will replace all doublequote. –  drk Aug 6 '10 at 8:35
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If just the quotes around "name" then you can use sed from command line or in a bash script:

    sed -i 's/ "name"/ '\'name\''/g' filename.json

Tested, works.

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