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I'm trying to query the OpenCalais service semanticproxy.com. Unfortunately, their url format is as follows:

http://service.semanticproxy.com/processurl/APIKEY/jsonp:handler_function/http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Germany

notice that the function callback, is not in a callback=? parameter, but rather follows the response format (jsonp:). This means that I can't use .getJSON, but rather need to use the .ajax method. So I have the following object definition:

function Subject() {
}

Subject.prototype.populate = function(page_title) {
  var url = "http://service.semanticproxy.com/processurl/APIKEY/jsonp:handler/http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/" + page_title;
  $.ajax({url: url, dataType: "script", type: "GET", cache: false, callback: null, data: null});
};

var handler = function (data) {
  // do stuff with the returned JSON
};

s = new Subject();
s.populate("Germany");

This works fine. But what I really want to do is set properties of my Subject object. But I don't know how to create a function in the context of the Subject that will be able to be used as the callback. i.e:

Subject.prototype.handler = function(data) { this.title = data.title } 

Any ideas?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You'd have to set a function on the window object. This is essentially (I think) what jQuery does with its .getJSON method. The below is a bit hacky but hopefully it points you in the right direction:

function Subject() {
}

Subject.prototype.populate = function(page_title) {
    // Save context object
    var subject = this;
    // Create function name like subjectHandler1281092055198
    var functionName = "subjectHandler" + new Date().getTime();
    window[functionName] = function(data) {
        // Invoke function with saved context and parameter
        subject.handler.call(subject, data);
    }
    var url = "http://service.semanticproxy.com/processurl/APIKEY/jsonp:" + functionName + "/http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/" + page_title;
    $.ajax({url: url, dataType: "script", type: "GET", cache: false, callback: null, data: null});
};

Subject.prototype.handler = function (data) {
  // do stuff with the returned JSON
};

s = new Subject();
s.populate("Germany");
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Re-read the question carefully, I read it exactly as you did the first time...his callback works, he wants to know how to reference the Subject that called the populate method. –  Nick Craver Aug 6 '10 at 11:40
    
@Nick re-read the solution carefully, it does exactly that. –  roryf Aug 6 '10 at 13:00
    
Thanks roryf. I think this is giving me a Subject, but as Nick said, not the Subject. With the insight you've given I took another look at the jQuery source (blew my mind the first time), and it seems that that is what is going on. So even with a normal "callback=?" you never get the Subject. Thanks for that. –  kmc Aug 6 '10 at 13:05
    
It executes the handler function on the original Subject instance, using the correct context so inside that function you have access to all the objects properties using this. Isn't that what you wanted? –  roryf Aug 6 '10 at 13:20
    
In fact it does, sorry roryf. I tested it but had made an error in my test code. Probably time for bed. Cheers for that! –  kmc Aug 6 '10 at 13:26
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I don't think you're going to be able to do this, just because of how JSONP works, look at how it actually comes back to the browser, it pretty much does this:

<script type="text/javascript">
  handler({ title: "Germany", ...other properties... });
</script>

There's no way to maintain a reference here, you could do one request at a time, or keep an object map for each subject, but there's no way to do it in the JSONP request.

An object map would look something like this:

//delcare this once for the page
var subjects = {};

//do this per subject
var s = new Subject();
s.populate("Germany");
subjects["Germany"] = s;

Then in your hanldler, if any of the data properties is "Germany", you could get it that way, for example:

var handler = function (data) {
  var subject = subjects[data.title];
  //subject is  your Germany subject, use it, go nuts!
};
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Thanks Nick. Glad I'm learning the cans and cant's before I try to architect something more than test scripts. Thanks again. –  kmc Aug 6 '10 at 13:09
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