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Recently when I was working with JavaScript "sort()" function, I found in one of the tutorials that this function does not sort the numbers properly. Instead to sort numbers, a function must be added that compares numbers, like the following code:-

<script type="text/javascript">
function sortNumber(a,b)
{
    return a - b;
}

var n = ["10", "5", "40", "25", "100", "1"];
document.write(n.sort(sortNumber));
</script>

The output then comes as:-

1,5,10,25,40,100

Now what I didn't understand is that why is this occurring & can anybody please tell in details as to what type of algorithm is being used in this "sort()" function? This is because for any other language, I didn't find this problem where the function didn't sort the numbers correctly.

Any help is greatly appreciated.

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1  
The actual sort algorithm used varies depending on the javascript engine implemented by the browser (see stackoverflow.com/questions/234683/… for details) but all still need to be fed the correct datatype to identify whether to sort by numeric value or by string value –  Mark Baker Aug 6 '10 at 11:46
1  
your example is not sorting numbers, it's sorting strings –  brad Aug 6 '10 at 13:20
    
The function sortNumber you pass to sort tell it how to compare two elements. –  satoru Aug 6 '10 at 13:31
    
Can anybody please suggest what to do as I found 3 answers very much perfect for me w.r.t. my question? I feel like making this question as a CW one. –  Knowledge Craving Aug 10 '10 at 11:54
1  
@KC IMHO, just mark the most up voted as the answer in this case –  Giu Aug 11 '10 at 11:08

7 Answers 7

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Well, if you are sorting the following list, it contains only strings:

var n = ["10", "5", "40", "25", "100", "1"];

So I would expect any language would compare them as strings, thus resulting in a sort order of:

var n = ["1", "10", "100", "25", "40", "5"];

Which necessitates your code to use a custom sort (as you have done) to cast the strings back to integers for the purposes of sorting.

Edit

As Pointy mentioned, by default the JavaScript sort() method sorts elements alphabetically, including numbers:

By default, the sort() method sorts the elements alphabetically and ascending. However, numbers will not be sorted correctly (40 comes before 5). To sort numbers, you must add a function that compare numbers.

Simply amazing... so a custom sort is required even for an array of integers.

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2  
In case it's unclear to the OP why a string-comparison would get this result, think of each digit in the number as if it were instead a letter of the alphabet, and put the "words" into alphabetical order. (This generalisation of "alphabetical order" to arbitrary strings is called "lexicographic order") –  David Aug 6 '10 at 11:46
2  
The default sort comparator always sorts by string values unless a comparator is provided. It does that regardless of the actual types of the array elements. –  Pointy Aug 6 '10 at 12:49

To answer your question on how the sorting function works, I will explain it in detail. As has been said in most of the answers here, calling only sort() on an array will sort your array using strings. Converting your integers to strings as well. Blech!

If you think of your items as characters instead of numbers it makes sense that it would be sorted that way. A good way to see this is to assign letters to your numbers.

//0 = a
//1 = b
//2 = c
//4 = e
//5 = f
//These two arrays are treated the same because they're composed of strings.
var nums  = ["10", "5", "40", "25", "100", "1"];
var chars = ["ba", "f", "ea", "cf", "baa", "b"];

//Here we can see that sort() correctly sorted these strings. Looking at the
//alphabetical characters we see that they are in the correct order. Looking
//at our numbers in the same light, it makes sense that they are sorted
//this way as well. After all, we did pass them as strings to our array.
chars.sort(); //["b", "ba", "baa", "cf", "ea", "f"]
nums.sort();  //["1", "10", "100", "25", "40", "5"]

//The bad part of sort() comes in when our array is actually made up of numbers.
var nums = [10, 5, 40, 25, 100, 1];
nums.sort(); //[1, 10, 100, 25, 40, 5]

//As a result of the default sorting function converting numbers to strings 
//before sorting, we get an unwanted result. We can fix this by passing in our 
//own function as a parameter to sort().

You can control how to sort the array by passing your own function as a parameter to the sort() function. This is nice, but unless you know how the sort() function works, it really won't do you any good.

sort() will call your function multiple times to re-arrange the array. Depending on what is returned from your function tells sort() what to do with the items in the array. If a negative number or 0 is returned, no re-arranging happens. If a positive number is returned, the two items switch place. sort() keeps track of which numbers it has already tested, so it doesn't end up testing numbers again later after it has switched the items around. If sort() re-arranges items, it will move back one position and see if it has tested these two items before. If it hasn't it will test them. If it has, it will continue on without running your function on them.

Sorting Numbers

Let's take a simple example and I will walk you through it:

var arr = [50, 90, 1, 10, 2];

arr = arr.sort(function(current, next){
    //My comments get generated from here
    return current - next;
});

//1 : current = 50, next = 90
//  : current - next (50 - 90 = -40)
//  : Negative number means no re-arranging
//  : Array now looks like [50, 90, 1, 10, 2]
//
//2 : current = 90, next = 1
//  : current - next (90 - 1 = 89)
//  : Positive number means sort() will switch these positions in the array
//  : Array now looks like [50, 1, 90, 10, 2]
//
//If sort() didn't backtrack, the next check would be 90 and 10, switch those 
//positions, check 90 and 2, and switch again. Making the final array
//[50, 1, 10, 2, 90], not sorted. But lucky for us, sort() does backtrack.
//
//3 : current = 50, next = 1
//  : current - next (50 - 1 = 49)
//  : Positive number means sort() will switch these positions in the array
//  : Array now looks like [1, 50, 90, 10, 2]
//
//If sort() wasn't smart, it would now check 50 and 90 again. What a waste! 
//But lucky for us again, sort() is smart and knows it already made this 
//check and will continue on.
//
//4 : current = 90, next = 10
//  : current - next (90 - 10 = 80)
//  : Positive number means sort() will switch these positions in the array
//  : Array now looks like [1, 50, 10, 90, 2]
//
//sort() backtracks one position and sees that it has not checked 50 and 10
//
//5 : current = 50, next = 10
//  : current - next (50 - 10 = 40)
//  : Positive number means sort() will switch these positions in the array
//  : Array now looks like [1, 10, 50, 90, 2]
//
//sort() backtracks one position and sees that it has not checked 1 and 10
//
//6 : current = 1, next = 10
//  : current - next (1 - 10 = -9)
//  : Negative number means no re-arranging
//  : Array now looks like [1, 10, 50, 90, 2]
//
//sort() remembers that it already checked 10 and 50 so it skips ahead
//sort() remembers that it already checked 50 and 90 so it skips ahead
//
//7 : current = 90, next = 2
//  : current - next (90 - 2 = 88)
//  : Positive number means sort() will switch these positions in the array
//  : Array now looks like [1, 10, 50, 2, 90]
//
//sort() backtracks one position and sees that it has not checked 50 and 2
//
//8 : current = 50, next = 2
//  : current - next (50 - 2 = 48)
//  : Positive number means sort() will switch these positions in the array
//  : Array now looks like [1, 10, 2, 50, 90]
//
//sort() backtracks one position and sees that it has not checked 10 and 2
//
//9 : current = 10, next = 2
//  : current - next (10 - 2 = 8)
//  : Positive number means sort() will switch these positions in the array
//  : Array now looks like [1, 2, 10, 50, 90]
//
//sort() backtracks one position and sees that it has not checked 1 and 2
//
//10: current = 1, next = 2
//  : current - next (1 - 2 = -1)
//  : Negative number means no re-arranging
//  : Array now looks like [1, 2, 10, 50, 90]
//
//sort() remembers that it already checked 2 and 10 so it skips ahead
//sort() remembers that it already checked 10 and 50 so it skips ahead
//sort() remembers that it already checked 50 and 90 so it skips ahead
//sort() has no more items to check so it returns the final array
//which is [1, 2, 10, 50, 90]

If you wanted the array to be ordered in descending order [90, 50, 10, 2, 1] you can just change the return statement from return current - next; to return next - current; like so:

var arr = [50, 90, 1, 10, 2];

arr = arr.sort(function(current, next){
    //My comments get generated from here
    return next - current;
});

//1 : current = 50, next = 90
//  : next - current (90 - 50 = 40)
//  : Positive number means sort() will switch these positions in the array
//  : Array now looks like [90, 50, 1, 10, 2]
//
//2 : current = 50, next = 1
//  : next - current (1 - 50 = -49)
//  : Negative number means no re-arranging
//  : Array now looks like [90, 50, 1, 10, 2]
//
//etc.

It does not matter if your array is composed of "string numbers" "5" or just numbers 5 when using your own function to sort numbers. Because when JavaScript is doing math, it treats "string numbers" as numbers. i.e. "5" - "3" = 2

Sorting Strings

When you sort strings, you can compare them using the > and < (greater-than and less-than) operators. The greater-than operator sorts the string by ascending order (A-Z, 1-9), and the less-than operator sorts by descending order (Z-A, 9-1). Different browsers use different sorting algorithms so when sorting by strings you have to make sure you are returning either 1 or -1, not true or false.

For example, this works in Chrome and FF, but not IE:

var arr = ['banana', 'orange', 'apple', 'grape'];

arr = arr.sort(function(current, next){
    return current > next;
});

The way to make sure your sorting algorithm works in every browser, use the ternary operator.

var arr = ['banana', 'orange', 'apple', 'grape'];

arr = arr.sort(function(current, next){
    return current > next? 1: -1;
});

When changing the way you're sorting (by ascending or descending order), in addition to changing the operators, you could keep the same operator and switch the current and next variables as we did when sorting numbers. Or since we are using the ternary operator, you could switch the 1 and -1.

Sorting Objects

Here is a neat trick that I thought I'd add in here. You can sort objects if you add them to an array and use their key to compare. Here is an example.

var arr = [
    {id: 2, name: 'Paul'},
    {id: 1, name: 'Pete'}
];

//sort numerically
arr = arr.sort(function(current, next){
    return current.id - next.id;
});
//Array now looks like [{id: 1, name: 'Pete'}, {id: 2, name: 'Paul'}]

//sort alphabetically
arr = arr.sort(function(current, next){
    return current.name > next.name? 1: -1;
});
//Array now looks like [{id: 2, name: 'Paul'}, {id: 1, name: 'Pete'}]

Recap

To sort numbers
in ascending order (1, 2, 3...): function(a, b){return a - b;}
in descending order (9, 8, 7...): function(a, b){return b - a;}

To sort strings
in ascending order (A, B, C...): function(a, b){return a > b? 1: -1;}
in descending order (Z, Y, X...): function(a, b){return b > a? 1: -1;}

To sort objects add them to an array,
then sort by key: function(a, b){return a.key - b.key;}

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this is extremely helpful and a wealth of information thank you –  James Daly Apr 28 '13 at 19:16
    
+1 for return objA.num - objB.num in the sort function instead of using ternary syntax. –  Web_Designer Jun 24 at 18:56

Javascript's sort sorts by default lexicographical, alphabetical. Thus as I understand it every element is treated as a string. The internal sorting algorithm is most probably quicksort or mergesort. To be able to use quicksort you need to be able to relate elements to each other, is a bigger than b? In the string case this ordering is already implemented.

Since you might want to sort your custom datatypes etc. you can provide a functional defining how to order two elements.

From your example your functional determines the order of two numbers a and b. Javascript sort then uses your function telling sort how to order the elements.

Turns out that mergesort is used by Mozilla, look at: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/234683/javascript-array-sort-implementation

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The problem lies with the use of strings to represent numbers, which the sort function unfortunately does as default. Strings are sorted alphabetically. The comparison function in your code just forces the strings to be evaluated as numbers.

I'd consider it very bad API design that the sort function defaults to treating the elements as strings, but it may be necessary given JavaScript's loose type system..

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No, in fact the Array sort() implementation always sorts by string values unless a sort function is supplied. In other words, the default sort comparator always calls "toString" before comparing. –  Pointy Aug 6 '10 at 12:47
    
@Pointy: ugh, that's nasty. I had to try it out before I could believe it. What were they thinking? –  Michael Borgwardt Aug 6 '10 at 12:54
    
I don't know, but I spent about 10 minutes on the issue just the other day :-) –  Pointy Aug 6 '10 at 13:50

The function sort will sort your array in an alphabetical sort order, even if it consists of integers; that's the reason why your array is sorted like that by calling sort without a parameter.

sortOrder is a comparison function that is used to define a new sort order for the array; this function will return

  • 0, if a and b are of the same value
  • a value > 0, if a has a bigger value than b
  • a value < 0, if a has a smaller value than b

In JavaScript, "1" - "2" will return -1, which is a number, and not a string anymore; by using the comparison function sortOrder on your array consisting of numbers wrapped in strings, you're ordering the array in a numerical sort order, thus resulting in 1,5,10,25,40,100, and not in 1,10,100,25,40,5

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You can delegate the sorting to your own sort function:

function sortnum(a,b) {
 return parseInt(a,10)-parseInt(b,10);
}
var n = ["10", "5", "40", "25", "100", "1"];
alert(n.sort(sortnum)); //=>["1", "5", "10", "25", "40", "100"]
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1  
Just a well-known tip: parseInt(a,10) can be replaced by ~~a for performance boost. –  naugtur Apr 11 '11 at 18:58
    
@naugtur if it is so well-known tip, it won't take you much time to find a link and give it to me :)?. I want to continue reading about that –  ajax333221 Feb 16 '12 at 16:06
    
Here you can read all about operators: developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Operators/… And that's the best thing I know about ~~ trick: james.padolsey.com/javascript/double-bitwise-not –  naugtur Feb 17 '12 at 21:46

And what if your n is defined as:

var n = [10, 5, 40, 25, 100, 1]; 
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1  
That would not change anything, because the sort() routine always sorts by the "toString()" value of the array elements unless a specific comparator function is supplied. –  Pointy Aug 6 '10 at 12:47

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