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long[] b = new long[1];
int i1 = b[0]; // compile error as it should

// no warning at all, large values gets converted to negative values silently
foreach (int i2 in b) 
{
}

class Customer : Person{}
Person[]p = new Person[]{mypers};

// no warning at all, throws typecastexception at runtime
foreach (Customer c in p) 
{
}

I know they cannot simply fix it, because it would break existing programs.

But why don't they make a compatibility option in c# compiler where I can turn on typesafe foreach block generation at least for new programs or programs where I am sure it works?

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closed as not constructive by kiamlaluno, Powerlord, Josh Kelley, mgroves, Rob Aug 9 '10 at 16:42

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

8  
In the future, ask a question, don't hang a question on a very controversial and inflammatory rant. –  Nick Craver Aug 6 '10 at 13:16
    
You mean they should add special type conversion rules for foreachspecifically? The problem has nothing to do with foreach. It is C#'s typesystem as a whole that allows certain conversions. It does so because they're useful in some cases. –  jalf Aug 6 '10 at 13:17
    
Agreed, "Can foreach be fixed w/o breaking existing code" would have been a question. –  Henk Holterman Aug 6 '10 at 13:18
16  
foreach isn't broken in C#. Your understanding of what it should do is. I could cause the same behavior in your single assignments by emulating what happens in the foreach statement: int i1 = (int) b[0]; or Customer c = (Customer)p[0];. By specifying a type in the foreach statement, you're telling the compiler to explicitly cast each element to your desired type and it's simply listening to you. –  Justin Niessner Aug 6 '10 at 13:22
1  
@codymanix - the bad decision is in your code, not in the compiler. You said in your foreach that you wanted longs typecast to ints. It did it. I don't see the problem. If you wanted longs in your foreach, you should have cast them to longs. -1 –  Joel Etherton Aug 6 '10 at 15:36
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5 Answers 5

foreach (var c in p) 
{
}

avoids the problem nicely, doesn't it?

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foreach (Person c in p) also would "solve" it, that is not the point.. –  codymanix Aug 6 '10 at 13:18
1  
No. The "point" apparently wasn't to ask a question either. Which makes me wonder why you posted your rant on a Q&A site. My point is that the language allows you to omit the type entirely, and the compiler will just use the correct one. If the simplest solution does the right thing, why waste your time complaining that a more complex one requires a minimum of thought to get right? –  jalf Aug 6 '10 at 13:21
3  
using "var" everywhere won't make programs easier to read. –  codymanix Aug 6 '10 at 13:26
1  
@codymanix - Now I'm really confused. You don't want to use type inference using var but you also don't want the compiler to try typecasting even after you explicitly specify a different type in the foreach loop. What exactly do you want the behavior to be? (keep in mind that foreach can iterate over collections that have varying types as well). –  Justin Niessner Aug 6 '10 at 13:29
1  
@Josh: legitimate questions aren't tagged with [rant] as this was. @codymanix: I think var is perfectly readable. –  jalf Aug 6 '10 at 13:31
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foreach is behaving the only way it can.

When foreach iterates over a collection, it doesn't necessarily know anything about the types that will be returned (it could by a collection of interface implementations, or simply objects in the case of the older .NET 'bag' style collections).

Consider this example:

var bag = new ArrayList();
bag.Add("Some string");
bag.Add(1);
bag.Add(2d);

How would foreach behave in this instance (the collection has a string, an int, and a double)? You could force foreach to iterate over the most compatible type which, in this case, is Object:

foreach(object o in bag)
{
    // Do work here
}

Interestingly enough, using var will do exactly that:

foreach(var o in bag)
{
    // o is an object here
}

But the members of object won't really allow you to do anything useful.

The only way to do anything useful is to rely on the developer to specify the exact type they want to use and then attempt to cast to that type.

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You are at liberty to create an extension method on IEnumerable that is type safe:

public static void Each(this IEnumerable @this, Action action)
{
    if (@this == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("this");
    if (action == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("action");

    foreach (TElement element in @this)
    {
        action(element);
    }
}

It is subtly different to the foreach loop and will occur additional overhead, but will ensure type safety.

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I've never seen the @ before, potentially stupid question but what's that do? –  AndrewC Aug 6 '10 at 13:22
2  
@AndyC stackoverflow.com/questions/91817/… –  Justin Aug 6 '10 at 13:27
1  
@ allows you to use a C# keyword as a variable name. So you can do questionable things like: int @foreach = 1; long @if = 2; string @class = "foo"; –  AlfredBr Aug 6 '10 at 13:28
    
You can use keywords as normal variables with the @ sign. normally you use it when interoperating with other languages which expose members that is a keyword in the other language. –  codymanix Aug 6 '10 at 13:28
    
It is simply added to let you use a reserved word as a variable name. –  JohannesH Aug 6 '10 at 13:29
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As for the why:

Using arrays, the compiler in fact translates the foreach statement into something that looks like the following.

private static void OriginalCode(long[] elements)
{
    foreach (int element in elements)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(element);
    }
}

private static void TranslatedCode(long[] elements)
{
    int element;
    long[] tmp1 = elements;
    int tmp2 = 0;

    while (tmp2 < elements.Length)
    {
        // the cast avoids an error
        element = (int)elements[tmp2++];
        Console.WriteLine(element);
    }
}

As you can see, the generated cast avoids the runtime error and of course leads to the semantic error in your case.

Btw, the same goes for IEnumerable and foreach which translates into the following code leading to the same behaviour and problem.

private static void OriginalCode(IEnumerable<long> elements)
{
    foreach (int element in elements)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(element);
    }
}

private static void TranslatedCode(IEnumerable<long> elements)
{
    int element;
    IEnumerator<long> tmp1 = elements.GetEnumerator();

    try
    {
        while (tmp1.MoveNext())
        {
            element = (int)tmp1.Current;
            Console.WriteLine(element);
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        (tmp1 as IDisposable).Dispose();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't believe that foreach gets translated into an simple if-statement. Maybe you mean a for-statement :) –  codymanix Aug 9 '10 at 11:04
    
I have posted an answer before comparing while, for, foreach, and goto to the point that they will all compile to the same IL. See it here stackoverflow.com/questions/2447559/… –  Matthew Whited Aug 9 '10 at 16:56
    
@codymanix Ops sorry, should be a while loop :) corrected –  Roland Sommer Aug 9 '10 at 22:27
    
@Matthew Whited: Indeed, the IL is pretty much the same for a lot of statement blocks. I have choosen the while loop for demonstration because I think it's the easiest way to show the cast. –  Roland Sommer Aug 9 '10 at 22:35
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EDIT: Clarified and corrected based on codymax's comment

Based on my interpretation of section 8.8.4 in the C# Spec foreach is expanded as as below. (See the part that begins "If the type X of expression is an array type then there is an implicit reference conversion from X to the System.Collections.IEnumerable interface.."

The first case converts values above int.MaxValue to -1. This is because operations don't throw overflow by default . Since the first case the conversion is in an unchecked context section 7.6.12 describes what's supposed to happen which is

the result is truncated by discarding any high-order bits that do not fit in the destination type.

The second does as expected throw a runtime InvalidCastException. This is probably because the type returned by Enumerator.Current. There's probably a section that describes this but I didn't look for it.

        long[] b = long[0] ;


        System.Collections.IEnumerator le = ((long[])(b)).GetEnumerator();

        int i2;
        while (le.MoveNext())
        {
            i2 = (int)(long)le.Current;

        }




        Person[] p = new Person[1] { mypers };

        System.Collections.IEnumerator e = ((Person[])(p)).GetEnumerator();

        Customer c;
           while (e.MoveNext())
           {
               c = (Customer)(Person)e.Current;

            }
share|improve this answer
    
Firstly it is wrong that values above int.MaxValue are converted to -1, they convert to the corresponding negative value instead. Secondly, foreach on arrays does not create a GetEnumerator call but instead a simple for-loop. Besides, the double-cast to Person and then to Customer is superfluous. –  codymanix Aug 11 '10 at 11:30
    
@codymax You're right about the conversion so I updated my answer. Why do you think it doesn't do a GetEnumerator? The double cast may be superfluous in some cases but perhaps not in all. –  Conrad Frix Aug 11 '10 at 15:01
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