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writing a recursive string reverse function out of curiosity, but having a bit of problem with XOR there. The whole point of this function, is to not use iterator, which is why it is a recursive function. this is not homework, just curiosity.

    private static char[] ReverseNL(char[] arr, int index)
    {
        var len = arr.Length;
        if (index > 0)
            arr[len - index] ^= arr[index - 1];
        return index-- < 1 ? arr : ReverseNL(arr, index);
    }

it seems to jamble the first part of my string

"hey there stack!" becomes "I♫→A ←E↨reht yeh"

it is always the first half of the phrase that gets jumbled...

UPDATE..

i suppose XOR wasn't really needed here.. so used basic assignment, also got rid of return.

    private static void ReverseNL(char[] arr, int index) {
        var len = arr.Length;
        if (index > 0 && index > len / 2) {
            var c = arr[len - index];
            arr[len - index] = arr[index - 1];
            arr[index - 1] = c;
            index--;
            ReverseNL(arr, index);
        }
    }
share|improve this question
5  
How old are you? –  NullUserException Aug 6 '10 at 14:10
3  
@NullUserException - Obviously old enough to throw in a reference to a class South Park song in a question (whether it's appropriate or not is another question). –  Justin Niessner Aug 6 '10 at 14:12
1  
I recommend changing your string to a more standard phrase, like: "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog" –  Lucas B Aug 6 '10 at 14:13
2  
Or maybe a palindrome, like "aibohphobia"? –  Dr. Wily's Apprentice Aug 6 '10 at 14:35
1  
Do you know what the XOR operator does? It looks like you think it will swap your charachters, this is what it does: 10110110 XOR 00011100 becomes: 10101010 Thus why you get mumbo jumbo –  Jimmy Hoffa Aug 6 '10 at 14:38

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you want a solution which uses XOR and recursion, try this:

private static void ReverseNL(char[] arr, int index)
{
    if (index <arr.Length/2)
    {
        arr[index] ^= arr[arr.Length - index-1];
        arr[arr.Length - index-1] ^= arr[index ];
        arr[index] ^= arr[arr.Length - index-1];
        ReverseNL(arr,++index);
    }
}

You don't need to return anything, since everything is done in the array. Of course you could just remove the XOR-part and just swap the elements, but this is much cooler. ;)

(edit: index should start at 0)

share|improve this answer
    
Of course this fails to reverse the string "abba" properly. –  strager Aug 6 '10 at 15:26
    
I guess you commented that before i made the edit? –  Marcus Johansson Aug 6 '10 at 18:16

Recursion is almost always used to make problems simpler. Recursive algorithms are typically functional in nature as well (though they don't have to be).

In the case of reversing a string (or a char[]), "simpler" means "operating on a smaller array".

For example, you can reduce as follows:

"test"
"est"   't'
"st"    'e'
"t"     's'
""      't'

(On the left is the data reduced; on the right is the cut data).

In pseudocode, you can perform the reduction as follows:

char[] reverse(char[] data) {
    if (data.Count() == 0) {
        return new char[] { };
    }

    char cut = data.First();
    char[] rest = data.Skip(1);

    char [] restReversed = reverse(rest);

    // ???
}

I'll leave it up to you to figure out what needs to be done next with the data you have.

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Likely not to be the most efficient, but this should give you some ideas on how to get the recursion working ...

    static string ReverseNL (string s)
    {
        if ((s == null) || (s.Length <= 1))
        {
            return s;
        }
        return ReverseNL(s.Substring(1)) + s[0];
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string src = "The quick brown fox";
        Console.WriteLine(src);
        src = ReverseNL(src);
        Console.WriteLine(src);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
that works too, very nice, thanks –  Sonic Soul Aug 6 '10 at 15:20
    
actually i think this is my favorite solution, as it is only 3 lines. simple and elegant. –  Sonic Soul Aug 6 '10 at 15:26

One observation: You are operating on and returning an array. Always the same array. An array is always a reference.

That means your return statement is overcomplicated and misleading. Just end with return arr; in all cases.

Consider that part of a general hint: make it simpler, and you will see errors easier. That -- in the return statement alone should raise a red flag.


// untested, simplified return
private static char[] ReverseNL(char[] arr, int index)
{
    var len = arr.Length;
    if (index > 0)
        arr[len - index] ^= arr[index - 1];

    // return index-- < 1 ? arr : ReverseNL(arr, index);

    if (index >= 1)
         ReverseNL(arr, index-1);

    return arr;     
}
share|improve this answer
    
i don't see what is so wrong with my return statement.. i could break it down into few lines, but it would do exactly the same thing. it is returning arr if index is 0, otherwise it recurses. that part is tested and working fine. –  Sonic Soul Aug 6 '10 at 14:30
    
@Sonic: You are reversing in-place. You don't need a return at all. If you do use return it is independent of the recursion yes/no. –  Henk Holterman Aug 6 '10 at 14:38

In this particular example, I'd rather do this:

return arr.Reverse();
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, but i did not ask for the best way to reverse a string.. this is just a curiosity exercise –  Sonic Soul Aug 6 '10 at 14:15
5  
You really missed the homework tag –  Henk Holterman Aug 6 '10 at 14:15
    
Surely a homework result should be asking for the most concise answer possible... –  Matthew Abbott Aug 6 '10 at 14:17
1  
@Matthew: No, homework is about doing something yourself. –  Henk Holterman Aug 6 '10 at 14:19
1  
@Sonic Soul, In my mind, that still falls under the realm of 'homework'. You need a slight nudge in the right direction to get you back on track, not a full answer to the problem. –  strager Aug 6 '10 at 14:36

The XOR has to be called twice to swap a pair of elements. It is only getting called once on the first half of the array. (In edit: strictly speaking, it's only getting called once for each assignment, so net effect is like doing a two-XOR swap on half the array.)

share|improve this answer
    
Oh that's creative, I wouldn't have come up with doing it that way.. –  Jimmy Hoffa Aug 6 '10 at 14:40

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