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Is there any difference between the Web Edition and Business Edition of SQL Azure other than the maximum supported database sizes? I'm assuming the naming has some significance but all of the information I find simply talks about the max db size. I want to know if there are any other differences such as SLA, replication, scalability, etc.

Any clues?

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Azure now has a premium edition (in preview) of their SQL Databases, which might interest you : windowsazure.com/en-us/pricing/details/sql-database/… –  billy Sep 6 '13 at 14:42
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3 Answers 3

up vote 79 down vote accepted

The two editions are identical except for capacity. Both offer the same replication and SLA.

EDIT April 3, 2014 - Updated to reflect SQL Database size limit now at 500GB

EDIT June 17, 2013: Since I originally posted this answer, a few things have changed with pricing (but the sizing remains the only difference between web & business editions)

Web Edition scales to 5GB, whereas Business Edition scales to 500GB. Also: with the new MSDN plans (announced at TechEd 2013; see ScottGu's blog post for more details), you'll now get monthly monetary credits toward any services you want to apply your credits to, including SQL Database (up to $150 per month, depending on MSDN tier - see this page for details around the new MSDN benefits).

Both allow you to set maximum size, and both are billed on an amortized schedule, where your capacity is evaluated daily. Full pricing details are here. You'll see that the base pricing begins at $4.995 (up to 100MB), then jumps to $9.99 (up to 1GB), and then starts tiered pricing for additional GB's.

Regardless of edition, you have the exact same set of features - it's all about capacity limits. You can easily change maximum capacity, or even change edition, with T-SQL. For instance, you might start with a Web edition:

CREATE DATABASE Test (EDITION='WEB', MAXSIZE=1GB)

Your needs grow, so you bump up to 5GB:

   ALTER DATABASE Test MODIFY (EDITION='WEB', MAXSIZE=5GB)

Now you need even more capacity, so you need to switch to one of the Business Edition tiers:

ALTER DATABASE Test MODIFY (EDITION='BUSINESS', MAXSIZE=10GB)

If you ever need to reduce your database size, that works just fine as well - just alter right back to Web edition:

ALTER DATABASE Test MODIFY (EDITION='WEB', MAXSIZE=5GB)
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Thanks for the reply David. From what I have gathered elsewhere the reason for the two different names is to allow for differentiation in the future. For example the Business edition might get more features that the Web edition doesn't. But for now they are identical other than size limitations. A little confusing but I can understand the reasoning. –  BrettRobi Aug 19 '10 at 17:10
    
The way I read it was they auto scale you, like as soon as my DB starts using 1.01GB I am bumped to the 5GB limit and pricing bracket, is this not the case? –  odyth Apr 20 '11 at 3:39
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to answer my question its No it will not auto scale you must go in and run a command to up the database size, which is lame. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee621788.aspx –  odyth Apr 20 '11 at 3:59
2  
Well... you set the cap. Then you're metered based on current usage. So, in effect, your cost is then auto-scaled. In your example, you'd set MAXSIZE=5GB. Then, for each day you're under 1GB, you're billed at the 1GB rate (amortized daily). For the days you go to 1.01GB (all the way up to 5GB), you're billed at the 5GB rate. If 29 of 30 days are under 1GB, and only one day between 1 and 5GB, you'd be billed around $11.32 ((9.99/30)*29) + ((49.95/30)*1). –  David Makogon Apr 20 '11 at 11:39
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I'm glad they don't auto scale. It's all money. I want a notification that the cap has been reached or preferably that the cap is being approached and then I want to have to manually intervene to increase my cost structure. Think of this way, if you do something wrong and MS autoscale for you, it could literally cost you thousands. –  rism Dec 15 '11 at 23:56
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A documented difference is the Business edition supports Federations:

http://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/sql-database-scale-out/

"Federations are supported in the Business edition. For more information, see Federations in SQL Database and SQL Database Federations Tutorial ... "

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1) The link is dead. 2) This isn't true; Federations worked with both Web and Business editions (not sure why the article said only business edition). 3) Federations are being retired, and going away along with Web and Business editions. –  David Makogon Jul 12 at 19:20
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I have noticed a behavioral difference between the two versions. In the Business edition we have set up for QA, the following code snippet gets an error when applying the foreign key unless a "GO" is placed after adding the column. Then it works fine. This is not needed in the Web edition databases we have for development.

IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT * 
                FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS 
               WHERE TABLE_SCHEMA='ASSIGN'
                 AND TABLE_NAME = 'ASSIGNTARGET_EXCEPTION' 
                 AND COLUMN_NAME = 'EXCESS_WEAR_FLAG')
    ALTER TABLE [ASSIGN].[ASSIGNTARGET_EXCEPTION] ADD [EXCESS_WEAR_FLAG] [varchar](1) NULL
-- GO  -- placing this here makes this sectino work.
IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT * 
                 FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS 
                WHERE  TABLE_SCHEMA ='ASSIGN'
                  AND TABLE_NAME = 'ASSIGNTARGET_EXCEPTION' 
                  AND CONSTRAINT_NAME = 'CHK_ATEXCPTN_EXCESSWEARFLAG')
BEGIN
    ALTER TABLE [ASSIGN].[ASSIGNTARGET_EXCEPTION]  WITH NOCHECK ADD  CONSTRAINT [CHK_ATEXCPTN_EXCESSWEARFLAG] CHECK  (([EXCESS_WEAR_FLAG]='N' OR [EXCESS_WEAR_FLAG]='Y'))
    ALTER TABLE [ASSIGN].[ASSIGNTARGET_EXCEPTION] CHECK CONSTRAINT [CHK_ATEXCPTN_EXCESSWEARFLAG]
END
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I suspect something else is going on in your scenario. To my knowledge there is still nothing different between the two editions other than what the maximum size database supported is. –  BrettRobi Feb 26 '13 at 19:38
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