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I want to create a function that will accept any old string (will usually be a single word) and from that somehow generate a hexadecimal value between #000000 and #FFFFFF, so I can use it as a colour for a HTML element.

Maybe even a shorthand hex value (e.g: #FFF) if that's less complicated. In fact, a colour from a 'web-safe' palette would be ideal.

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2  
Could give some sample input and/or links to the similar questions? –  qw3n Aug 6 '10 at 17:59
2  
Not an answer, but you may find the following useful: To convert a hexadecimal to an integer, use parseInt(hexstr, 10). To convert an integer to a hexadecimal, use n.toString(16), where n is a integer. –  Cristian Sanchez Aug 6 '10 at 18:00
    
@qw3n - sample input: just short, plain old text strings... like 'Medicine', 'Surgery', 'Neurology', 'General Practice' etc. Ranging between 3 and say, 20 characters... can't find the other one but here's the java question: stackoverflow.com/questions/2464745/… @Daniel - Thanks. I need to sit down and have another serious go at this. could be useful. –  Darragh Aug 6 '10 at 18:42

9 Answers 9

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Just porting over the Java from Compute hex color code for an arbitrary string to Javascript:

function hashCode(str) { // java String#hashCode
    var hash = 0;
    for (var i = 0; i < str.length; i++) {
       hash = str.charCodeAt(i) + ((hash << 5) - hash);
    }
    return hash;
} 

function intToRGB(i){
    var c = (i & 0x00FFFFFF)
        .toString(16)
        .toUpperCase();

    return "00000".substring(0, 6 - c.length) + c;
}

To convert you would do:

intToRGB(hashCode(your_string))
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great! thanks, this works well. I don't know much about bitwise operators and stuff so your help porting it over is appreciated. –  Darragh Aug 8 '10 at 23:28
3  
jsfiddle.net/sUxQe sometimes LESS than 6 ... –  Skylar Saveland May 2 '13 at 2:17
    
It needs to pad the hex strings, such as: ("00" + ((this >> 24) & 0xFF).toString(16)).slice(-2) + ("00" + ((this >> 16) & 0xFF).toString(16)).slice(-2) + ("00" + ((this >> 8) & 0xFF).toString(16)).slice(-2) + ("00" + (this & 0xFF).toString(16)).slice(-2); –  Thymine Feb 6 '14 at 22:38

Here's an adaptation of CD Sanchez' answer that consistently returns a 6-digit colour code:

var stringToColour = function(str) {

    // str to hash
    for (var i = 0, hash = 0; i < str.length; hash = str.charCodeAt(i++) + ((hash << 5) - hash));

    // int/hash to hex
    for (var i = 0, colour = "#"; i < 3; colour += ("00" + ((hash >> i++ * 8) & 0xFF).toString(16)).slice(-2));

    return colour;
}

Usage:

stringToColour("greenish");
// -> #9bc63b

Example:

http://jsfiddle.net/sUK45/

(An alternative/simpler solution might involve returning an 'rgb(...)'-style colour code.)

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This worked perfectly for me. Thanks! –  geilt May 21 '13 at 0:33
    
A Benchmark for this: jsperf.com/3-rgb-ints-to-hexcolor-string –  yckart May 30 '13 at 10:30
8  
Thanks for making this even less readable. –  Joe Freeman May 30 '13 at 11:35
1  
This code works awesome in conjunction with NoSQL auto-generated ID's, your colour will be the same every time for the same user. –  deviavir Jun 26 '14 at 20:57

If your inputs are not different enough for a simple hash to use the entire color spectrum, you can use a seeded random number generator instead of a hash function.

I'm using the color coder from Joe Freeman's answer, and David Bau's seeded random number generator.

function stringToColour(str) {
    Math.seedrandom(str);
    var rand = Math.random() * Math.pow(255,3);
    Math.seedrandom(); // don't leave a non-random seed in the generator
    for (var i = 0, colour = "#"; i < 3; colour += ("00" + ((rand >> i++ * 8) & 0xFF).toString(16)).slice(-2));
    return colour;
}
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I wanted similar richness in colors for HTML elements, I was surprised to find that CSS now supports hsl() colors, so a full solution for me is below:

Also see How to automatically generate N "distinct" colors? for more alternatives more similar to this.

function colorByHashCode(value) {
    return "<span style='color:" + value.getHashCode().intToHSL() + "'>" + value + "</span>";
}
String.prototype.getHashCode = function() {
    var hash = 0;
    if (this.length == 0) return hash;
    for (var i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {
        hash = this.charCodeAt(i) + ((hash << 5) - hash);
        hash = hash & hash; // Convert to 32bit integer
    }
    return hash;
};
Number.prototype.intToHSL = function() {
    var shortened = this % 360;
    return "hsl(" + shortened + ",100%,30%)";
};

In HSL its Hue, Saturation, Lightness. So the hue between 0-359 will get all colors, saturation is how rich you want the color, 100% works for me. And Lightness determines the deepness, 50% is normal, 25% is dark colors, 75% is pastel. I have 30% because it fit with my color scheme best.

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A very versatile solution. –  MastaBaba May 18 at 15:02

I just built a feature that fits the bill in Please.js, it still isn't merged with the main repo, but you can see it here:

https://github.com/ibarrajo/PleaseJS

You can map the string to a color like so:

var color = Please.make_color({from_hash: 'any string goes here'});

"any string goes here" will return as "#47291b"
and "another!" returns as "#1f0c3d"

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I find that generating random colors tends to create colors that do not have enough contrast for my taste. The easiest way I have found to get around that is to pre-populate a list of very different colors. For every new string, assign the next color in the list:

// Takes any string and converts it into a #RRGGBB color.
var StringToColor = (function(){
    var instance = null;

    return {
    next: function stringToColor(str) {
        if(instance === null) {
            instance = {};
            instance.stringToColorHash = {};
            instance.nextVeryDifferntColorIdx = 0;
            instance.veryDifferentColors = ["#000000","#00FF00","#0000FF","#FF0000","#01FFFE","#FFA6FE","#FFDB66","#006401","#010067","#95003A","#007DB5","#FF00F6","#FFEEE8","#774D00","#90FB92","#0076FF","#D5FF00","#FF937E","#6A826C","#FF029D","#FE8900","#7A4782","#7E2DD2","#85A900","#FF0056","#A42400","#00AE7E","#683D3B","#BDC6FF","#263400","#BDD393","#00B917","#9E008E","#001544","#C28C9F","#FF74A3","#01D0FF","#004754","#E56FFE","#788231","#0E4CA1","#91D0CB","#BE9970","#968AE8","#BB8800","#43002C","#DEFF74","#00FFC6","#FFE502","#620E00","#008F9C","#98FF52","#7544B1","#B500FF","#00FF78","#FF6E41","#005F39","#6B6882","#5FAD4E","#A75740","#A5FFD2","#FFB167","#009BFF","#E85EBE"];
        }

        if(!instance.stringToColorHash[str])
            instance.stringToColorHash[str] = instance.veryDifferentColors[instance.nextVeryDifferntColorIdx++];

            return instance.stringToColorHash[str];
        }
    }
})();

// Get a new color for each string
StringToColor.next("get first color");
StringToColor.next("get second color");

// Will return the same color as the first time
StringToColor.next("get first color");

While this has a limit to only 64 colors, I find most humans can't really tell the difference after that anyway. I suppose you could always add more colors.

While this code uses hard-coded colors, you are at least guaranteed to know during development exactly how much contrast you will see between colors in production.

Color list has been lifted from this SO answer, there are other lists with more colors.

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Here is another try:

function stringToColor(str){
  var hash = 0;
  for(var i=0; i < str.length; i++) {
    hash = str.charCodeAt(i) + ((hash << 3) - hash);
  }
  var color = Math.abs(hash).toString(16).substring(0, 6);

  return "#" + '000000'.substring(0, 6 - color.length) + color;
}
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Yet another solution for random colors:

function colorize(str) {
    for (var i = 0, hash = 0; i < str.length; hash = str.charCodeAt(i++) + ((hash << 5) - hash));
    color = Math.floor(Math.abs((Math.sin(hash) * 10000) % 1 * 16777216)).toString(16);
    return '#' + Array(6 - color.length + 1).join('0') + color;
}

It's a mixed of things that does the job for me. I used JFreeman Hash function (also an answer in this thread) and Asykäri pseudo random function from here and some padding and math from myself.

I doubt the function produces evenly distributed colors, though it looks nice and does that what it should do.

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'0'.repeat(...) is not valid javascript –  kikito May 21 '14 at 16:20
    
@kikito fair enough, probably I had the prototype extended somehow (JQuery?). Anyway, I've edited the function so it's javascript only... thanks for pointing that out. –  estani May 22 '14 at 13:29

Here's a solution I came up with to generate aesthetically pleasing pastel colours based on an input string. It uses the first two chars of the string as a random seed, then generates R/G/B based on that seed.

It could be easily extended so that the seed is the XOR of all chars in the string, rather than just the first two.

Inspired by David Crow's answer here: Algorithm to randomly generate an aesthetically-pleasing color palette

//magic to convert strings to a nice pastel colour based on first two chars
//
// every string with the same first two chars will generate the same pastel colour
function pastel_colour(input_str) {

    //TODO: adjust base colour values below based on theme
    var baseRed = 128;
    var baseGreen = 128;
    var baseBlue = 128;

    //lazy seeded random hack to get values from 0 - 256
    //for seed just take bitwise XOR of first two chars
    var seed = input_str.charCodeAt(0) ^ input_str.charCodeAt(1);
    var rand_1 = Math.abs((Math.sin(seed++) * 10000)) % 256;
    var rand_2 = Math.abs((Math.sin(seed++) * 10000)) % 256;
    var rand_3 = Math.abs((Math.sin(seed++) * 10000)) % 256;

    //build colour
    var red = Math.round((rand_1 + baseRed) / 2);
    var green = Math.round((rand_2 + baseGreen) / 2);
    var blue = Math.round((rand_3 + baseBlue) / 2);

    return { red: red, green: green, blue: blue };
}

GIST is here: https://gist.github.com/ro-sharp/49fd46a071a267d9e5dd

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