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Here's what I'm trying do to in a single SQL Server procedure:

@ID1 int

select ID2 from TableA where ID1 = @ID1

(for each selected @ID2)
    select * from TableB where ID2 = @ID2

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
What are your table structure and required output? What, exactly are you trying to do, here? – AllenG Aug 6 '10 at 18:18
    
Do you want a separate result set for each select from TableB, or are you okay with a single result set returned that includes all those rows? – SqlRyan Aug 6 '10 at 18:18
    
I need a single result set. – asmo Aug 6 '10 at 18:25
up vote 10 down vote accepted

That can be done in a single statement:

SELECT b.*
  FROM TABLE_B b
  JOIN TABLE_A a ON a.id2 = b.id2
 WHERE a.id1 = @ID1

But this means that there will be duplicates if more than one record in TABLE_A relates to a TABLE_B record. In that situation, use EXISTS rather than adding DISTINCT to the previous query:

SELECT b.*
  FROM TABLE_B b
 WHERE EXISTS(SELECT NULL
                FROM TABLE_A a
               WHERE a.id2 = b.id2
                 AND a.id1 = @ID1)

The IN clause is equivalent, but EXISTS will be faster if there are duplicates:

SELECT b.*
  FROM TABLE_B b
 WHERE b.id2 IN (SELECT a.id2
                   FROM TABLE_A a
                  WHERE a.id1 = @ID1)
share|improve this answer
    
and A.ID1 = @ID1... – Jonathan Aug 6 '10 at 18:20

Try this:

select * from TableB b where exists (select top 1 * from TableA a where a.ID2 = b.ID2)
share|improve this answer
SELECT * 
FROM TableB 
WHERE ID2 IN (SELECT ID2 FROM TableA WHERE ID1 = @ID1)

Generally speaking, you don't want to do any kind of looping in SQL Server. Try using "Set based" operations.

share|improve this answer
    
If you post code or XML, please highlight those lines in the text editor and click on the "code" button (101 010) on the editor toolbar to nicely format and syntax highlight it! – marc_s Aug 6 '10 at 18:21
    
The formatting is sucky for SQL, so I dont bother with it. If its really bugging you, you are free to edit the post. – StingyJack Aug 6 '10 at 18:28

For each doesnt work in sql, you must use cursors.

declare @id int
declare @id2 int

declare mycursor cursor for
   select id2 from tablea where id=@id

open mycursor

fetch next from mycursor into @id2

while @@fetch_status = 0
 begin

   your code here

   fetch next from mycursor into @id2
 end
close mycursor
deallocate mycursor
share|improve this answer
7  
cursors are evil! – Jonathan Aug 6 '10 at 18:21
    
If you post code or XML, please highlight those lines in the text editor and click on the "code" button (101 010) on the editor toolbar to nicely format and syntax highlight it! – marc_s Aug 6 '10 at 18:22
    
No, i always use it and i never have problems with that, but, if he need a single clause, he can use exists or join clause, but cursors and forech do the same effect – elchente23 Aug 6 '10 at 18:36
    
Actually, yes - cursors ARE the work of the devil, if you have more than 5 concurrent users and more than 1'000 rows of data - don't use them – marc_s Aug 6 '10 at 19:41
    
el-chente, Changing from loop to set based ops can reap untold magnitudes of performance increase (even for smaller sets), but may be a bit more difficult up front to implement. – StingyJack Aug 9 '10 at 12:29

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