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Why does the code below not produce an identical output file to the input file?

The idea is to buffer a part of the file in and write it out from a smaller buffer (this is a small program reproducing an error in a larger project where I am streaming a file). When these files are checked in a hex editor comparison tool the output file differs somewhat.

fsIn = new FileStream("c:\\wmvs\\Wildlife.wmv", FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read);
        fsOut = new FileStream("c:\\Users\\public\\documents\\compare\\out.wmv",      FileMode.Create, FileAccess.Write);

        bData = new byte[fsIn.Length / 10];
        bOut = new byte[524288];

        fsIn.Read(bData, 0, bData.Length);

        bool bGo = true;

        while (bGo)
        {
            if (nWrittenOut == bData.Length)
            {
                fsIn.Read(bData, 0, bData.Length);
            }

            if (nWrittenOut + bOut.Length >= bData.Length)
            {
                Array.Clear(bOut, 0, bOut.Length);

                int nWhatsLeft = bData.Length - nWrittenOut;
                Array.Copy(bData, nWrittenOut, bOut, 0, nWhatsLeft);

                fsIn.Read(bData, 0, bData.Length);
                nWrittenOut = 0;
                int nBufPos = nWhatsLeft;

                nWhatsLeft = bOut.Length - nWhatsLeft;
                Array.Copy(bData, nWrittenOut, bOut, nBufPos, nWhatsLeft);
                nWrittenOut += bOut.Length;

            }
            else
            {
                Array.Copy(bData, nWrittenOut, bOut, 0, bOut.Length);
                nWrittenOut += bOut.Length;
            }

            fsOut.Write(bOut, 0, bOut.Length);
            fsOut.Flush();

            if (fsOut.Position >= fsIn.Length)
                bGo = false;
        }

    }

I have tried all the below answers and nothing works. It must be my logic in the code. However I cannot see the problem ???? It seems I am missing a whole chunk in the output file eqivalent to the length of bOut.

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1  
If the goal is to copy a file I would use any of the copy mechanisms available.. I think there's like a File.Copy If it's to read in a stream and write out another stream, then I am baffled as to the lot of code you have in here.. –  Jimmy Hoffa Aug 6 '10 at 19:46
1  
A more descriptive question title will probably yield a lot more answers. –  Ignacio Aug 6 '10 at 19:47
    
Describing how that data is off would help. Have the new-lines been changed? Zero characters written into the file? etc. Be specific, and as for your question title, it is terribly bad. This is not your personal forum. –  Heath Hunnicutt Aug 6 '10 at 19:51
1  
Perhaps it would also help if you give examples of how the hex comparisons differ... –  Ates Goral Aug 6 '10 at 19:54
3  
Research the using statement for your first two lines to guarantee closure of the files and release of the associated resources. –  Jesse C. Slicer Aug 6 '10 at 19:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't know what you're doing, but why don't you try this, it's likely that reading and writing through a FileStream might not be encoding agnostic, so stick with a stream and just pass bytes along:

using (Stream inStream = File.Open(inFilePath, FileMode.Open))
{
    using (Stream outStream = File.Create(outFilePath))
    {
        while (inStream.Position < inStream.Length)
        {
            outStream.WriteByte((byte)inStream.ReadByte());
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This solution is great if you want to watch the individual bytes crawl from a to b. In other words: It's slow as hell. Better use msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd782932.aspx or stackoverflow.com/questions/230128 -- or maybe even just msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/c6cfw35a.aspx –  dtb Aug 6 '10 at 19:58
    
@dtb: Just trying to keep the example as simple as possible for the poster, he can figure out to use a set size buffer after he gets it working to begin with I figure. And the File.Copy I already suggested in comment above.. –  Jimmy Hoffa Aug 6 '10 at 20:01
2  
@dtb, Note the overload of .CopyTo() which allows for a user-specified buffer size. –  Jesse C. Slicer Aug 6 '10 at 21:23

it's probably read/writing in Text mode, so that any 0x0A in encounters in the binary file is being converted to a CR/LF.

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No... It's reading & writing in byte arrays. –  David Aug 6 '10 at 19:49

You will need to use BinaryReader and BinaryWriter to avoid the Environment.NewLine translation that you are being "provided."

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You need to check the return value of your fsIn.Read method. The Read method will not always read the number of bytes that you requested. If you are seeing extra "0" bytes in the results then this is probably the cause.

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Why are you not checking return value of fsIn.Read()? I have no (developer) experience with Windows platform, but can you always be sure that exactly this number of bytes will be read? What about the end of file? :)

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