Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do I load a setting from an external xml file located in the same folder as my program? Or should I be using an old school .ini file? It is only the MySQL server name and a location name that I need to pass to my App.

share|improve this question
    
This question is a little unclear. Can you elaborate on the portion of the question relating to MySQL server name and location? –  John Weldon Aug 6 '10 at 20:42
    
Sorry, I was referring to if I want to put my MySQL server name in a file that can be modified outside of my program. Like if I wanted to use a different mysql server for a different client using the program. –  muncherelli Aug 6 '10 at 20:57
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You should look at Application Settings and the ConfigurationManager. You could also use the Connection Strings section in the app.config.

... For AppSettings ...

C# Code... You will need reference System.Configuration

var value = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["MySetting"];

App.Config

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<configuration>
  <appSettings>
    <add key="MySetting" value="My Value"/>
  </appSettings>
</configuration>

... For Connection Strings ...

C# Code... You will need reference System.Configuration

var value = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["MySqlConn"];

App.Config

<configuration>
  <connectionStrings>
    <add name ="MySqlConn"
         connectionString="Server=myServerAddress;Database=myDataBase;
                           Uid=myUsername;Pwd=myPassword;"/>
  </connectionStrings>
</configuration>
share|improve this answer
    
+1, Throw a mention to the ConnectionStrings section in there too since that sounds like what he wants.. –  Jimmy Hoffa Aug 6 '10 at 20:47
    
@Jimmy, good call ;o) ... I was in the middle of that when you posted a comment. Thanks. –  Matthew Whited Aug 6 '10 at 20:51
add comment

To Elaborate on Matthew W's answer, it sounds like you need to Add -> New Item -> Application Configuration File in your project. This will generate an app.config (which will compile to [executableName].exe.config).

Within the app.config, you'll have an area for ConnectionStrings. Put your connection information there and call it using ConfigurationManager.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I was hoping that the link at the bottom of my answer was clear enough. Maybe I should move it above the sample code. –  Matthew Whited Aug 6 '10 at 20:52
    
@Matthew Whited: Yeah, I was posting my answer just as you were editing yours. It's probably plenty clear now. –  AllenG Aug 6 '10 at 20:57
    
I moved them and made them bold anyway. Thanks again. –  Matthew Whited Aug 6 '10 at 21:02
add comment

You might want to go with the new, but in case you want to go with the INI, here's some source for a windows forms version:

using Microsoft.VisualBasic;
using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Data;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
//After you've added this class code to your application, here's how you may want to use it:

//Dim objclsINI As New clsINI("c:\fName.ini")
//objclsINI.WriteINI("Settings", "ClockTime", "12:59")
//objclsINI.WriteINI("Settings", "ClockTime", "12:59", "c:\test.ini")
//Dim strData As String = objclsINI.ReadINI("Settings", "ClockTime", "(none)")

public class clsINI
{
    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", EntryPoint = "GetPrivateProfileStringA", CharSet = CharSet.Ansi, SetLastError = true, ExactSpelling = true)]
    private static extern int GetPrivateProfileString(string lpApplicationName, string lpKeyName, string lpDefault, System.Text.StringBuilder lpReturnedString, int nSize, string lpFileName);
    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", EntryPoint = "WritePrivateProfileStringA", CharSet = CharSet.Ansi, SetLastError = true, ExactSpelling = true)]
    private static extern int WritePrivateProfileString(string lpApplicationName, string lpKeyName, string lpString, string lpFileName);
    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", EntryPoint = "WritePrivateProfileStringA", CharSet = CharSet.Ansi, SetLastError = true, ExactSpelling = true)]
    private static extern int FlushPrivateProfileString(int lpApplicationName, int lpKeyName, int lpString, string lpFileName);
    // API functions



    string strFilename;
    string strSection;

    string strKey;
    // Constructor, accepting a filename
    public clsINI(string Filename)
    {
        strFilename = Filename;
    }
    // Overloaded Constructor Creating The Default FileName
    public clsINI()
    {
        strFilename = Application.StartupPath + "\\" + Application.ProductName + ".ini";
    }

    // filename property
    public string FileName {
        get { return strFilename; }
        set { strFilename = value; }
    }
    // Section property
    public string Section {
        get { return strSection; }
        set { strSection = value; }
    }
    // Key property
    public string Key {
        get { return strKey; }
        set { strKey = value; }
    }

    public string ReadINI(string Default)
    {
        string functionReturnValue = null;
        // Returns a string from your INI file
        int intCharCount = 0;
        string strMessage = null;
        System.Text.StringBuilder objResult = new System.Text.StringBuilder(256);
        strMessage = "";
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(strKey))
            strMessage = "The INI File Class Does Not Have A Defined Key To Read.";
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(strSection))
            strMessage = strMessage + ControlChars.CrLf + "The INI File Class Does Not Have A Defined Section To Read.";
        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(strMessage)) {
            MessageBox.Show(strMessage, "INI Error");
            return;
        }
        intCharCount = GetPrivateProfileString(strSection, strKey, Default, objResult, objResult.Capacity, strFilename);
        if (intCharCount > 0)
            functionReturnValue = Strings.Left(objResult.ToString(), intCharCount);
        return functionReturnValue;
    }

    public string ReadINI(string Key, string Default)
    {
        string functionReturnValue = null;
        // Returns a string from your INI file
        int intCharCount = 0;
        System.Text.StringBuilder objResult = new System.Text.StringBuilder(256);
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(strSection)) {
            MessageBox.Show("The INI File Class Does Not Have A Defined Section.", "INI Error");
            return;
        }
        strKey = Key;
        intCharCount = GetPrivateProfileString(strSection, Key, Default, objResult, objResult.Capacity, strFilename);
        if (intCharCount > 0)
            functionReturnValue = Strings.Left(objResult.ToString(), intCharCount);
        return functionReturnValue;
    }

    public string ReadINI(string Section, string Key, string Default)
    {
        string functionReturnValue = null;
        // Returns a string from your INI file
        int intCharCount = 0;
        System.Text.StringBuilder objResult = new System.Text.StringBuilder(256);
        strSection = Section;
        strKey = Key;
        intCharCount = GetPrivateProfileString(Section, Key, Default, objResult, objResult.Capacity, strFilename);
        if (intCharCount > 0)
            functionReturnValue = Strings.Left(objResult.ToString(), intCharCount);
        return functionReturnValue;
    }

    public string ReadINI(string Section, string Key, string Default, string sFileName)
    {
        string functionReturnValue = null;
        // Returns a string from your INI file
        int intCharCount = 0;
        System.Text.StringBuilder objResult = new System.Text.StringBuilder(256);
        strKey = Key;
        strSection = Section;
        strFilename = sFileName;
        intCharCount = GetPrivateProfileString(Section, Key, Default, objResult, objResult.Capacity, sFileName);
        if (intCharCount > 0)
            functionReturnValue = Strings.Left(objResult.ToString(), intCharCount);
        return functionReturnValue;
    }

    public void WriteINI(string Value)
    {
        // Writes a string to your INI file
        string strMessage = null;
        strMessage = "";
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(strKey))
            strMessage = "The INI File Class Does Not Have A Defined Key To Write.";
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(strSection))
            strMessage = strMessage + ControlChars.CrLf + "The INI File Class Does Not Have A Defined Section To Write.";
        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(strMessage)) {
            MessageBox.Show(strMessage, "INI Error");
            return;
        }
        WritePrivateProfileString(strSection, strKey, Value, strFilename);
        Flush();
    }

    public void WriteINI(string Key, string Value)
    {
        // Writes a string to your INI file
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(strSection)) {
            MessageBox.Show("The INI File Class Does Not Have A Defined Section To Write.", "INI Error");
            return;
        }
        WritePrivateProfileString(strSection, Key, Value, strFilename);
        Flush();
    }

    public void WriteINI(string Section, string Key, string Value)
    {
        // Writes a string to your INI file
        strKey = Key;
        strSection = Section;
        WritePrivateProfileString(Section, Key, Value, strFilename);
        Flush();
    }

    public void WriteINI(string Section, string Key, string Value, string sFileName)
    {
        strKey = Key;
        strSection = Section;
        strFilename = sFileName;
        // Writes a string to your INI file
        WritePrivateProfileString(Section, Key, Value, sFileName);
        Flush();
    }

    private void Flush()
    {
        // Stores all the cached changes to your INI file
        FlushPrivateProfileString(0, 0, 0, strFilename);
    }

}
share|improve this answer
1  
Ack, make it stop make it stop! –  Jimmy Hoffa Aug 6 '10 at 20:53
1  
LOL, anyway... A thought might be to use the indexer instead of the read/write methods in your class. I did this on a version of an INI wrapper I had to write and it looked clean and worked great. And while it would probably be best to avoid the INI file, there are times when you need to do it (such as interoperating with older code bases.) –  Matthew Whited Aug 6 '10 at 20:59
add comment

.NET has the notion of a settings file associated with an assembly.

If your assembly name is:

My.Program.exe

you can create a settings file for that assembly that is automatically available through the ConfigurationManager:

My.Program.exe.config

You can easily make this a part of your project by adding an App.config file: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms184658(VS.80).aspx

share|improve this answer
    
It doesn't appear to be automatic -- a call to ConfigurationManager.OpenExeConfiguration is required beforehand. –  Brent Foust Jul 12 '13 at 17:15
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.