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I have a list of integers, i.e.:

values = [55, 55, 56, 57, 57, 57, 57, 62, 63, 64, 79, 80]

I am trying to find the largest difference between two consecutive numbers. In this case it would be 15 from 64->79. The numbers can be negative or positive, increasing or decreasing or both. The important thing is I need to find the largest delta between two consecutive numbers.

What is the fastest way to do this? These lists can contain anywhere from hundreds to thousands of integers.

Edit: This is the code I have right now:

    prev_value = values[0]
    largest_delta = 0

    for value in values:
            delta = value - prev_value
            if delta > largest_delta:
                    largest_delta = delta
            prev_value = value

    return largest_delta

Is there a faster way to do this? It takes a while.

share|improve this question
1  
Your code fails if the deltas are all negative; it returns zero. – John Machin Aug 7 '10 at 1:36
up vote 17 down vote accepted
max(abs(x - y) for (x, y) in zip(values[1:], values[:-1]))
share|improve this answer
2  
for such large lists though, use itertools.izip to avoid constructing a list of tuples in memory – aaronasterling Aug 7 '10 at 1:27
    
That's really quite beautiful :-) – Dirk Groeneveld Aug 7 '10 at 1:27
1  
I still can't get used to this "new" Ptyhon. What happened to my beautiful, readable language? :-) – paxdiablo Aug 7 '10 at 1:29
1  
@John - But how could a negative delta be the largest? If x - y = -15, then y - x = 15. The positive value is always larger (higher), therefore abs(delta) is appropriate. – Greg Aug 7 '10 at 1:44
1  
@aaronasterling: In Python 3.x, zip doesn't construct a list. I had originally suggested using itertools.izip in 2.x, but it wouldn't really help because the slicing builds two new lists. You could use itertools.islice to solve that. – dan04 Aug 7 '10 at 1:46

Try timing some of these with the timeit module:

>>> values = [55, 55, 56, 57, 57, 57, 57, 62, 63, 64, 79, 80]
>>> max(values[i+1] - values[i] for i in xrange(0, len(values) - 1))
15
>>> max(v1 - v0 for v0, v1 in zip(values[:-1], values[1:]))
15
>>> from itertools import izip, islice
>>> max(v1 - v0 for v0, v1 in izip(values[:-1], values[1:]))
15
>>> max(v1 - v0 for v0, v1 in izip(values, islice(values,1,None)))
15
>>>
share|improve this answer

This is more as an advertisement for the brilliant recipes in the Python itertools help.

In this case use pairwise as shown in the help linked above.

from itertools import tee, izip

def pairwise(iterable):
    "s -> (s0,s1), (s1,s2), (s2, s3), ..."
    a, b = tee(iterable)
    next(b, None)
    return izip(a, b)

values = [55, 55, 56, 57, 57, 57, 57, 62, 63, 64, 79, 80]

print max(b - a for a,b in pairwise(values))
share|improve this answer

With reduce (ugly i guess)

>>> foo = [5, 5, 5, 5, 8, 8, 9]    
>>> print reduce(lambda x, y: (max(x[0], y - x[1]), y), foo, (0, foo[0]))[0]
3
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