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How can I create an instance of the Java console inside of a panel?

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Do you mean "The java console" the one that provides information about the applets and JNLP applications in use? –  OscarRyz Dec 5 '08 at 7:05
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4 Answers 4

Here's a functioning class. You can install an instance of this into the system out and err using:

PrintStream con=new PrintStream(new TextAreaOutputStream(...));
System.setOut(con);
System.setErr(con);

Updated 2014-02-19: To use EventQueue.invokeLater() to avoid GUI threading issues which can crop up very rarely with the original.

Updated 2014-02-27: Better implementation

Updated 2014-03-25: Correct recording & deletion of lines in text area to be within the run() method to avoid race-condition between appending and deleting which can happen if the console is flooded with output. The end result seems cleaner to me, as well.

import java.awt.*;
import java.io.*;
import java.util.*;
import java.util.List;
import javax.swing.*;

public class TextAreaOutputStream
extends OutputStream
{

// *************************************************************************************************
// INSTANCE MEMBERS
// *************************************************************************************************

private byte[]                          oneByte;                                                    // array for write(int val);
private Appender                        appender;                                                   // most recent action

public TextAreaOutputStream(JTextArea txtara) {
    this(txtara,1000);
    }

public TextAreaOutputStream(JTextArea txtara, int maxlin) {
    if(maxlin<1) { throw new IllegalArgumentException("TextAreaOutputStream maximum lines must be positive (value="+maxlin+")"); }
    oneByte=new byte[1];
    appender=new Appender(txtara,maxlin);
    }

/** Clear the current console text area. */
public synchronized void clear() {
    if(appender!=null) { appender.clear(); }
    }

public synchronized void close() {
    appender=null;
    }

public synchronized void flush() {
    }

public synchronized void write(int val) {
    oneByte[0]=(byte)val;
    write(oneByte,0,1);
    }

public synchronized void write(byte[] ba) {
    write(ba,0,ba.length);
    }

public synchronized void write(byte[] ba,int str,int len) {
    if(appender!=null) { appender.append(bytesToString(ba,str,len)); }
    }

@edu.umd.cs.findbugs.annotations.SuppressWarnings("DM_DEFAULT_ENCODING")
static private String bytesToString(byte[] ba, int str, int len) {
    try { return new String(ba,str,len,"UTF-8"); } catch(UnsupportedEncodingException thr) { return new String(ba,str,len); } // all JVMs are required to support UTF-8
    }

// *************************************************************************************************
// STATIC MEMBERS
// *************************************************************************************************

    static class Appender
    implements Runnable
    {
    private final JTextArea             textArea;
    private final int                   maxLines;                                                   // maximum lines allowed in text area
    private final LinkedList<Integer>   lengths;                                                    // length of lines within text area
    private final List<String>          values;                                                     // values waiting to be appended

    private int                         curLength;                                                  // length of current line
    private boolean                     clear;
    private boolean                     queue;

    Appender(JTextArea txtara, int maxlin) {
        textArea =txtara;
        maxLines =maxlin;
        lengths  =new LinkedList<Integer>();
        values   =new ArrayList<String>();

        curLength=0;
        clear    =false;
        queue    =true;
        }

    synchronized void append(String val) {
        values.add(val);
        if(queue) { queue=false; EventQueue.invokeLater(this); }
        }

    synchronized void clear() {
        clear=true;
        curLength=0;
        lengths.clear();
        values.clear();
        if(queue) { queue=false; EventQueue.invokeLater(this); }
        }

    // MUST BE THE ONLY METHOD THAT TOUCHES textArea!
    public synchronized void run() {
        if(clear) { textArea.setText(""); }
        for(String val: values) {
            curLength+=val.length();
            if(val.endsWith(EOL1) || val.endsWith(EOL2)) {
                if(lengths.size()>=maxLines) { textArea.replaceRange("",0,lengths.removeFirst()); }
                lengths.addLast(curLength);
                curLength=0;
                }
            textArea.append(val);
            }
        values.clear();
        clear =false;
        queue =true;
        }

    static private final String         EOL1="\n";
    static private final String         EOL2=System.getProperty("line.separator",EOL1);
    }

} /* END PUBLIC CLASS */

And here's a screen shot of it in action:

enter image description here

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2  
this have less code: unserializableone.blogspot.com/2009/01/… –  timaschew Aug 21 '11 at 17:10
1  
@timaschew: Of course it has less code, because it does less. Look at mine a little closer and you'll see it controls the amount of text in the output text pane so it doesn't just fill continuously and crash with an OOM. And it handles exceptions. And it's a self-contained class. –  Lawrence Dol Feb 19 at 18:04
1  
@timaschew: Also, that simple solution will flood the EDT if enough output is thrown at it. Try running something that generates a lot of output continuously and in quick succession and watch what happens to the GUI. –  Lawrence Dol Feb 27 at 23:18
    
okay you convinced me ;) –  timaschew Feb 28 at 9:11
2  
I'm amazed you edited this 6 years later. And I also want to thank you! –  Derek Ziemba Apr 18 at 0:18
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@Sofware Monkey:

It works!! :)

alt text

import javax.swing.*;
import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import java.io.*;

public class Main{
    public static void main( String [] args ) throws InterruptedException  {
        JFrame frame = new JFrame();
        frame.add( new JLabel(" Outout" ), BorderLayout.NORTH );

        JTextArea ta = new JTextArea();
        TextAreaOutputStream taos = new TextAreaOutputStream( ta, 60 );
        PrintStream ps = new PrintStream( taos );
        System.setOut( ps );
        System.setErr( ps );


        frame.add( new JScrollPane( ta )  );

        frame.pack();
        frame.setVisible( true );

        for( int i = 0 ; i < 100 ; i++ ) {
            System.out.println( i );
            Thread.sleep( 500 );
        }
    }
}
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1  
Please upvote his answer if it works. –  guerda Dec 5 '08 at 7:23
4  
If helps for anything. I've mark this as community wiki. At least I won't get points for something I didn't program. –  OscarRyz Dec 5 '08 at 16:13
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I know that this is an old thread but the fact that I found it while trying to figure out a good way of doing this means others probably will too.

Here's a (Probably) cleaner way of doing what software monkey posted:

import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.OutputStream;
import java.util.ArrayList;

import javax.swing.JTextArea;

/**
 * Represents a console viewable through a <code>JTextArea</code>.
 * 
 * <p>
 *  Implementation:
 *  <code>
 *      System.setOut(new PrintStream(new Console( ... )));
 *  </code>
 *  </p>
 * 
 * @author Derive McNeill
 *
 */
public class Console extends OutputStream {

    /**
     * Represents the data written to the stream.
     */
    ArrayList <Byte> data = new ArrayList <Byte> ();

    /**
     * Represents the text area that will be showing the written data.
     */
    private JTextArea output;

    /**
     * Creates a console context.
     * @param output
     *      The text area to output the consoles text.
     */
    public Console(JTextArea output) {
        this.output = output;
    }

    /**
     * Called when data has been written to the console.
     */
    private void fireDataWritten() {

        // First we loop through our written data counting the lines.
        int lines = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < data.size(); i++) {
            byte b = data.get(i);

            // Specifically we look for 10 which represents "\n".
            if (b == 10) {
                lines++;
            }

            // If the line count exceeds 250 we remove older lines.
            if (lines >= 250) {
                data = (ArrayList<Byte>) data.subList(i, data.size());
            }
        }

        // We then create a string builder to append our text data.
        StringBuilder bldr = new StringBuilder();

        // We loop through the text data appending it to the string builder.
        for (byte b : data) {
            bldr.append((char) b);
        }

        // Finally we set the outputs text to our built string.
        output.setText(bldr.toString());
    }

    @Override
    public void write(int i) throws IOException {

        // Append the piece of data to our array of data.
        data.add((byte) i);

        // Indicate that data has just been written.
        fireDataWritten();
    }

}
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I don't think this will work; the text area is directly accessed via fireDataWritten by whatever thread does the write, which is not guaranteed to be the EDT. –  Lawrence Dol Feb 27 at 20:15
    
Also, this will have exponentially worse performance as more data is added to the text area such that more and more bytes will have to be converted to a string, and then set into the text area. Not a great characteristic for a GUI console (which may easily have 10's of MiB of data in it). Making this worse, it creates one Byte object for every byte written. And it repopulates the text area for every byte written. –  Lawrence Dol Feb 27 at 20:29
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ByteArrayOutputStream can be used to omit buffering stuff.

private void redirectConsoleTo(final JTextArea textarea) {
    PrintStream out = new PrintStream(new ByteArrayOutputStream() {
        public synchronized void flush() throws IOException {
            textarea.setText(toString());
        }
    }, true);

    System.setErr(out);
    System.setOut(out);
}

Rather than limiting line number, you can bind ByteArrayOutputStream#reset() to some button.

private void redirectConsoleWithClearButton(final JTextArea textarea, JButton clearButton) {
    final ByteArrayOutputStream bytes = new ByteArrayOutputStream() {
        public synchronized void flush() throws IOException {
            textarea.setText(toString());
        }
    };

    clearButton.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
            bytes.reset();
        }
    });

    PrintStream out = new PrintStream(bytes, true);

    System.setErr(out);
    System.setOut(out);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This accesses the text area off the EDT, which, as I found out, will eventually cause a deadlock in the GUI. –  Lawrence Dol Feb 27 at 20:26
    
Also, this will have exponentially worse performance as more data is added to the text area such that more and more bytes will have to be converted to a string, and then set into the text area. Not a great characteristic for a GUI console (which may easily have 10's of MiB of data in it). –  Lawrence Dol Feb 27 at 20:27
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