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i tried with the following code , but i can't understand why it's giving me wrong answer. i am computing the 2's complement and adding with another no.

#include <stdio.h>

int add(int a, int b) {
    while (a) {
        a = (a & b) << 1;
        b = a^b;
    }
    return b;
}

int sub(int a, int b) // add a with b's 2's complement.
{
    return (add(a, add(~b, 1)));
}

int main() {
    int a, b, res;
    a = 3, b = 1;
    res = sub(a, b);
    printf("%d\n", res);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
3  
sub() is giving you the wrong result because add() is wrong. The logic in sub() is fine. –  NullUserException Aug 7 '10 at 13:49
    
What's wrong with -? What's wrong with a + b? –  Charles Bailey Aug 7 '10 at 13:51
    
This brings back memories too. Our professor wouldn't let us use loops, or if statements for that matter. –  NullUserException Aug 7 '10 at 13:51
1  
@Charles It's homework. –  NullUserException Aug 7 '10 at 13:51
    
@NullUserException: So what if it's homework; it's also tagged as C. + and - are always available in C. This feels very much like "not a real question" to me. –  Charles Bailey Aug 7 '10 at 14:04

4 Answers 4

Here is better solution
http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1149929/

#include <stdlib.h> /* atoi() */
#include <stdio.h>  /* (f)printf */
#include <assert.h> /* assert() */

int add(int x, int y) {
    int carry = 0;
    int result = 0;
    int i;

    for(i = 0; i < 32; ++i) {
        int a = (x >> i) & 1;
        int b = (y >> i) & 1;
        result |= ((a ^ b) ^ carry) << i;
        carry = (a & b) | (b & carry) | (carry & a);
    }

    return result;
}

int negate(int x) {
    return add(~x, 1);
}

int subtract(int x, int y) {
    return add(x, negate(y));
}

int is_even(int n) {
    return !(n & 1);
}

int divide_by_two(int n) {
    return n >> 1;
}

int multiply_by_two(int n) {
    return n << 1;
}

int multiply(int x, int y) {
    int result = 0;

    if(x < 0 && y < 0) {
        return multiply(negate(x), negate(y));
    }

    if(x >= 0 && y < 0) {
        return multiply(y, x);
    }

    while(y > 0) {
        if(is_even(y)) {
                x = multiply_by_two(x);
                y = divide_by_two(y);
        } else {
                result = add(result, x);
                y = add(y, -1);
        }
    }

    return result;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    int from = -100, to = 100;
    int i, j;

    for(i = from; i <= to; ++i) {
        assert(0 - i == negate(i));
        assert(((i % 2) == 0) == is_even(i));
        assert(i * 2 == multiply_by_two(i));
        if(is_even(i)) {
                assert(i / 2 == divide_by_two(i));
        }
    }

    for(i = from; i <= to; ++i) {
        for(j = from; j <= to; ++j) {
                assert(i + j == add(i, j));
                assert(i - j == subtract(i, j));
                assert(i * j == multiply(i, j));
        }
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks but i was trying to use the add funtion mentioned in a post below it by Tom Leys , donno why it's not working –  pranay Aug 7 '10 at 14:12
    
this is from stackoverflow.com/questions/1149929/… please vote for it there –  Dan D. Aug 7 '10 at 14:30
up vote 2 down vote accepted

i used a different add() function as suggested by NullUserException, it works now:

int add(int a,int b)
{
int x;
x=a^b;
while(a&b)
{
    b=((a&b)<<1);
    a=x;
    x=a^b;
    //b=(a^b);
}
return x;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This will through an error on while(a&b) statement as a and b is not boolean –  Chirag Tayal Feb 24 '13 at 4:47
4  
@ChiragTayal in C almost anything can be a boolean. –  Flexo Mar 10 '13 at 10:03
    
@ChiragTayal 0 is false and all other numbers are true in C –  REALFREE Jul 20 at 2:19

Considering how negative numbers are represented, the following will compute a - b:

int a, b, c;
// assign to a and b
c = a + (~b + 1); // () not needed, just to show the point

as the OP already noted:) This moves the attention to your add implementation, that is of course wrong. The following is an odd way to do it (just since other better ways are already given)

int add1(int a, int b, int *c)
{
  int r = *c & 1;
  a &= 1; b &= 1;
  *c = a&b | a&r | b&r;
  return a^b^r;
}
int inv(int a)
{
  int i, r = 0;
  for(i = 0; i < sizeof(int)*8; i++)
  {
    r = r<<1 | (a&1);
    a >>= 1;
  }
  return r<<1;
}
int add(int a, int b)
{
  int r = 0, i;
  int c = 0;
  for(i=0; i < sizeof(int)*8; i++)
  {
    r |= add1(a>>i, b>>i, &c);
    r <<= 1;
  }
  return inv(r);
}

int sub(int a, int b)
{
  return add(a, add(~b, 1));
}

(keeping the same idea the code can be made better, just too tired to do it finer)

share|improve this answer
    
The OP got that. –  quantumSoup Aug 7 '10 at 16:20
    
the title being "Subtracting two numbers without using ‘-’ operator" which does not mean implement add/sub bitwise like your shown code, that is just the way you thought it could be done, but there's no clue about why teacher asked you that. Maybe he wants to be sure you understood 2's complement, and ~ being a bitwise operator, makes the whole code bitwise - so this too is taken into account. Moreover, here there's not this simple insight, so the answer can't be "unuseful" (as the down button say) –  ShinTakezou Aug 7 '10 at 16:24
    
ops - all that code just hides that! - and it is obscure the connection between title and code. This shows the solution is right, provided that add is implemented correctly :) - titles should be more "catch it" –  ShinTakezou Aug 7 '10 at 16:25

add method implementation is incorrect. do like this -> A java way of this.

public int add(int a, int b){
  do {
    a = a & b; //carry
    b = a ^ b;  //addition
    a = a << 1; //carry shift to one bit left
  }while(a != 0);  //exit 
  return b;     //addition result
}

  public int sub(int a, int b){
    return add(a, add(~b, 1)); 

  }
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