Sign up ×
Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other. Join them; it only takes a minute:

On average, how many lines of code should a developer write per day?

I want to know how to answer this question.

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by Matthew Flaschen, Stefan Kendall, Gert Grenander, OMG Ponies, William Pursell Aug 8 '10 at 5:09

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

Work smarter, not harder. – Marko Aug 8 '10 at 5:10
The answer is Forty-two. – hobbs Aug 8 '10 at 5:11
The historical answer is "about ten lines of code per day":… I've even heard that those ten lines of code are roughly constant no matter which programming language you're using -- good high-level ones vs extremely low-level ones, functional or procedural, object oriented or not. – sarnold Aug 8 '10 at 5:11

4 Answers 4

LoC is not an accurate way to describe productivity. It doesn't take into account how much work has been done, just how much your codebase has bloated.

share|improve this answer

Some days you'll net none, other days you may net a few hundred. Depends heavily on the project, and the people involved.

share|improve this answer
Since I use the headfirst strategy in web development, its usually a day of writing tons of code, and a day of debugging with little lines of code – TheLQ Aug 8 '10 at 5:09

As many as he or she should.

share|improve this answer
Measuring programming progress by lines of code is like measuring aircraft building progress by weight. -- Bill Gates – Jake Petroules Aug 8 '10 at 5:09

That depends on so many factors it's impossible to give a general answer. Plus, how do you define "should"? Lines of code are also a poor measure of progress anyways...

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.