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What was the single thing you learned (either in classes or during work) that felt most like scales falling off your eyes?

For me, it was a lecture about microcode, because that filled the gap of understanding between electrons flowing through transistors to form logic gates, and assembler programming. It finally made me feel that I understood completely how a computer works, on all levels.

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78 Answers 78

With assembly, writing bytes to the address space of the screen and seeing pixels change.

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University classes in theoretical computer science and compiler construction.

On the theoretical side, I learned about terms like correctness and formal provableness, so where the limits of being able to write correct software are. I my view, some knowledge in this area is mandatory for writing software that does what it should, even if formal proofs are acutally hardly ever done in real-life software development.

There has been no other place where I learned so much about programming, importance of theory (in some areas), but also stuff like how to implement complex data structures efficiently like in compiler construction. Knowledge in this area does not only help for related problems like building parsers for complex data formats, macro languages or similiar stuff, but also helps to get some idea what the computer actually does when we enter instructions in high-level language and what needs to be done to implement software efficiently.

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that all the theoretical stuff that i learn in cs doesn't necessary apply that well in real world. yup, normalization should always be done to tables in databases...wat?!!! all your data is in this table? what is this column all over the places?

we should use UML to do all the documentation, wait, what you guys have never heard of UML? is this some sort of a twilight zone?

that, trying to write a good program is more than getting the algorithm which is closest to n(0) or just remembering the syntax really, really well.

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Learning Smalltalk, in my concrete case Squeak.

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Data Structures.

When I learned all of the common ones I realised that a lot of the code I had made could have been done a lot better. Although when I learned all of that stuff it was during my first year of University, so I wasn't exactly an expert by that stage. Before learning about linked lists, I was doing silly things like creating very large arrays, and simply hoping that the array won't ever be exhausted.

Now when I see a problem, I have a much clearer idea of how the data should be stored and accessed, along with the speeds of each implementation.

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I had started windows programming with MFC but concept of Windows (parent, child, sibling etc.) was not very clear to me. It may seem very weird but as soon as I read about GetDlgItem function, everything became clear :-). Suddenly reading MSDN become my favorite hobby.

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Python's use of lists. After reviewing the list of methods, I was extremely confused as to why something called a "list" would need these. Working through them, however, taught me quite a bit about data structures, including stacks, queues, linked lists, and eventually tuples, dictionaries, and sets as I worked through "why does this need something different than a list?"

For a while, though, my Python code did more list manipulation than my Scheme code.

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'A' + 32 = 'a'

Took me a while to fully appreciate the fact that empirically everything is just numbers and not abstract 'a' letters and 'b' letters etc. I'm also a EE, so I'm slightly biased.

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This is taking me way back to my youth. Apple ProDOS had just come out. Prior to that was plain ol' Apple DOS 3.3 with its flat file system, which I cut my teeth on.

I had an "a ha!" moment when I figured out the difference between absolute and relative pathnames and that they were interchangeable. The concept of the "current working directory" suddenly took on a whole new dimension which was missing before. Sure, it had all been explained in numerous books and magazines, but it didn't sink in until that moment.

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Learning how pointers worked in C was definitely a light-bulb moment. But I had a much better one a few years later: modularity and abstraction. What is significant is that it came after I'd been doing both for months. Experience can be a wonderful teacher.

(What actually happened was that I was learning how to write Windows programs in C against the Win16 API. The Petzold book was absolute gold, but it taught "start with this skeleton". That was the key. I eventually had a batch file to start a new program by copying the template I had made of the essential pieces. When I learnt DDE, there was so much mechanical stuff you had to do that it was (by then) natural to abstract it away into another .c file. Then I built a small library on top of my own DDE one and that's when I realized what I was doing. The lesson has stayed with me every since.)

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Lisp and the idea that you can use code to execute other code.

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In my 2nd CS C++ class and I finished my homework assignment on pointers. I couldn't believe it actually worked.

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It's been said many times but it's the same for me: Pointers

A spooky "clunk" noise at the back of my head as the relationship between code and hardware fell into place in a way it never really had before.

I'm sure there are many other ways to get that "ah ha" moment and that I was a dullard to have taken so long to have it happen for me but, until it happens, there is something fundamentally missing in one's grasp of the whole system one is working with.

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When I started to learn Design Patterns, I then realized the real power of polymorphism. It really opened my eyes, and has completely changed the way I think about every project.

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Much like the OP, my epiphany occurred while tracing instructions through an pipeline. It was like the last piece of the puzzle. All of a sudden there was no mystery left about computers. This was all there was to know, everything else was just gravy.

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Coming from a C++, C#, and Java background, many of the concepts of Scheme (a dialect of Lisp) such as first-order procedures, code as data, data as code were eye-opening (see Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs).

Clojure (a JVM Lisp) is also eye-opening for its use of built-in concurrency.

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When I first saw how a clever algorithm could be used to replace a bunch of really stinky code, I realized there was more to programming than just learning IBM 1401 instructions. Many times I have ached to start coding a project, and then forced myself to do some more thinking.

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Desk Calculator example in Kernighan and Pike. It demonstrated how to use lexx, yacc, function pointers, implement a new language, all in one simple example.

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