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i read a lot in that forum, but i couldn't find a proper way to add all items to my dictionary... So maybe someone can help me! first a explanation:

rows = cur.fetchall() 
columns=[desc[0] for desc in cur.description]  
GID_Distances = {}  
if len(rows) > 0:
    for row in rows:
      items = zip(columns, row)
      GID_Distances = {}
      for (name,  value) in items:
         GID_Distances[name]=value

rows is a list from a sql-statement. so in that list are several values with the same key... I just want to get something like a table something like this: {['id': 1, 'point':2], ['id':2, 'point':3]} but for the loop above is the result just the last item, because it overwrites all before. Any ideas????

share|improve this question
3  
don't check that the length of a list is nonempty before you iterate over it. this is implicit in iterating over it. –  aaronasterling Aug 8 '10 at 10:35
1  
You should accept Kenny's answer –  John La Rooy - AKA gnibbler Aug 8 '10 at 12:43
    
if cur is a cursor on a db then there is probably a type of cursor that behaves like a dict. –  Jochen Ritzel Aug 8 '10 at 18:10

2 Answers 2

If you have an iterable of pairs i.e. [(k1,v1),(k2,v2),...], you could apply dict on it to make it a dictionary. Therefore, your code could be written simply as

rows = cur.fetchall() 
columns = [desc[0] for desc in cur.description]  
# or: columns = list(map(operator.itemgetter(0), cur.description))
#     don't call list() in Python 2.x.
GID_Distances = [dict(zip(columns, row)) for row in rows]
# note: use itertools.izip in Python 2.x
share|improve this answer
    
+1 forgot about dict –  aaronasterling Aug 8 '10 at 11:41
    
That worked perfect! uhu, so much shorter... great! so, i will see if i can go on with that... have to change because i used the dictionary before! Thanks for the fast help, great! –  user414278 Aug 8 '10 at 11:46

you are redefining GID_Distances to a blank dictionary in the loop without first storing the value. store the rows in a list like so:

rows = cur.fetchall() 
columns=[desc[0] for desc in cur.description]  
results = []
for row in rows:
  GID_Distances = {} 
  items = zip(columns, row)
  for (name,  value) in items:
     GID_Distances[name]=value
  results.append(GID_Distances)
share|improve this answer
    
but then this error occurs: NameError: global name 'GID_Distances' is not defined –  user414278 Aug 8 '10 at 10:44
1  
there must be a typo then. there is no good reason for that to happen. For example, you are accessing columns just fine and it's defined at the same block level as GID_Distances. Check that your spelling is the same in both places. –  aaronasterling Aug 8 '10 at 10:45
    
don't think that there is a typo, because it's the same code... i just added a #... –  user414278 Aug 8 '10 at 10:49
    
double check to be sure. I find a copy and paste of the variable names often works. Are there any functions involved? This sort of thing can happen because of messed up indentation. –  aaronasterling Aug 8 '10 at 10:53
    
but the error occurs in the line of the loop... thats the first time i use GID_Distances, because i deleted the row before... –  user414278 Aug 8 '10 at 10:58

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