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Here's some code I saw once. Can you see what's wrong with it?

[updated]

public class ResourceManager1
{
    private final String mutex = "";
    Object resource = null;

    public Object getResource()
    {
    	synchronized (mutex)
    	{
    		if (resource == null)
    		{
    			resource = new Object();
    		}
    	}

    	return resource;
    }
}

public class ResourceManager2
{
    private final String mutex = "";
    Object resource = null;

    public Object getResource()
    {
    	synchronized (mutex)
    	{
    		if (resource == null)
    		{
    			resource = new Object();
    		}
    	}

    	return resource;
    }
}
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oh goody, more downmarking without commenting. Was it that I used Java rather than C#? –  fiddlesticks Dec 5 '08 at 11:20
    
Probably that it's not really a question for discussion or help.. it's basically a trivia quiz. Some people probably don't go for that in a question... –  Cowan Jan 11 '09 at 9:25
    
Just for the record (just noticed this) it's probably a little weird to use the British/Australian '-isation' in the title -- even though I prefer it, the java keyword is -ize so that might make it more searchable. :) –  Cowan Jan 11 '09 at 9:27
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3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Never synchronize on strings, particularly string literals which are interned. You've basically just got a single lock.

In general, never synchronize on any reference that might be visible outside your class (including "this") unless the purpose of the external visibility is precisely for locking purposes. I usually use a private final variable created solely for the purpose of locking.

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We have a winner! –  fiddlesticks Dec 5 '08 at 11:04
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You are using the same String as a mutex for both classes and hence only one of the synchronized blocks can be used at a time, which does not seem to be the intention of the code.

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It's not the immutability of Strings which is the problem here - it's interning of string literals. Java could have kept immutable strings but not done interning, in which case this code would have worked. –  Jon Skeet Dec 5 '08 at 11:05
    
Ah, true...I knew what I meant but said it badly. Which we all know is not a good thing for a programmer to do, thanks for the correction. :) –  lemnisca Dec 5 '08 at 11:08
    
yep, could have used mutex = new String(""); :) –  fiddlesticks Dec 5 '08 at 11:10
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mutex is not final and resource is not private.

Besides, you need a getResource method that returns resource, but I suppose this is just a typo.

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