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Is there a difference between a subroutine that does

return;

and one that does

return undef;

?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 34 down vote accepted

return; will return an empty list in list context but undef in scalar context. return undef; will always return a single value undef even in list context.

In general, it's usually not a good idea to return undef; from a subroutine normally used in list context:

sub foo { return undef }
if ( my @x = foo() ) {
    print "oops, we think we got a result";
}

In general, it's usually not a good idea to return; from a subroutine normally used in scalar context, because it won't behave as the user expects in list context:

sub foo { return }
%x = ( 'foo' => foo(), 'bar' => 'baz' );
if ( ! exists $x{'bar'} ) {
    print "oops, bar became a value, not a key";
}

Both of these errors happen quite a bit in practice, the latter more so, perhaps because subs that are expected to return a scalar are more common. And if it's expected to return a scalar, it had better return a scalar.

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Given

sub foo { return; }
sub bar { return undef; }

In scalar context, they behave the same.

my $foo = foo();   # $foo is undef
my $bar = bar();   # $bar is undef

In list context, they behave differently

my @foo = foo();   # @foo is ()  (an empty list)
my @bar = bar();   # @bar is ( undef )  (a one-element list)

Note that a one-element list is a true value in boolean context, even though the only element is undef.

In general, it's usually not a good idea to return undef; from a subroutine, because of how it behaves in context.

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3  
This is why "Perl Best Practices" (and Perl::Critic) suggest not using return undef. –  hillu Aug 8 '10 at 17:49
5  
@hillu: and it is same reason why sometime it is good idea to use it. For example function is supposed to return logical (boolean) answer and you wish to use it another function call foo(1, bar(), 2). If bar would written with return; you will be surprised ;-) –  Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Aug 8 '10 at 18:07
3  
One of the more than a few things PBP gets wrong. –  ysth Aug 8 '10 at 18:37

I think I still agree with PBP though.

1) You should avoid nesting function calls:

my $result = bar();
foo(1, $result, 2);

2) You should always be explicit (when doing "complicated" things):

foo(1, scalar bar(), 2);
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1) It's not just nesting function calls. 2) Yes, from the caller's perspective that would be a good thing. From the callee's perspective it shouldn't be counted on. –  ysth Aug 11 '10 at 1:37
    
1) more examples then? anyway, I believe you would end up with erratic results more often with $ perl -wle 'sub get_values { return undef; }; my @values = get_values; print scalar @values;' 1 If you want to be more explicit and proper, there is always Contextual::Return p3rl.org/Contextual::Return –  nicomen Aug 11 '10 at 12:23
2  
your get_values is intended for use in list context, and as such should not return undef. But if you had a get_value function that returned a scalar, it should always return a scalar, never an empty list, so it would use return undef. See ysth's answer. –  cjm Sep 16 '10 at 21:39

The book "Perl Best Practices" recommends the use of return; instead of return undef; because the latter would return a one-element list in list context (the other answers already mention this). This would be a "nasty bug" according to the book.

However, I think returning nothing can actually cause serious bugs (probably difficult to find), whereas calling a boolean function in list context seems rather simple to debug.

So I always return something (that evaluates to) false in my boolean functions (usually 0 for false and 1 for true).
(Yes, this would also return a one-element list in list context - so the comment in the book is technically right -, but then the actual error would be calling the boolean function in list context.)

To be clear, I still recommend the book. It offers a lot of good advice.
And I am referring to Chapter 9 (Subroutines), page 199/200 ("Use a bare return to return failure.") in the book "Perl Best Practices" by Damian Conway (O'Reilly Media, Inc.), ISBN 978-0-596-00173-5. Not sure if there's another/newer edition.

Side note:
Perl seems to return an empty string when negating something. my $foo = 5; return !$foo; returns q().

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