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c++:

static void doIp(byte data[])
{
  unsigned char j, k;
  byte val;
  byte buf[8];
  byte *p;
  byte i = 8;

  for(i=0; i<8; i++)
  {
    val = data[i];
    p = &buf[3];
    j = 4;

    do
    {
      for(k=0; k<=4; k+=4)
      {
        p[k] >>= 1;
        if(val & 1) p[k] |= 0x80;
        val >>= 1;
      }
      p--;
    } while(--j);
  }

  memcpy(data, buf, 8);
}

c#: ?

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closed as not a real question by James McNellis, dtb, abelenky, dan04, bmargulies Aug 9 '10 at 2:15

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

6  
What have you tried ...? –  strager Aug 8 '10 at 18:50
    
What does the code do? –  dtb Aug 8 '10 at 18:50
5  
What exactly is the question? Are you trying to convert this code from C++ to C#? This isn't particularly good C++ code to begin with: it looks an awful lot like C. If you are trying to convert it to C#, you should consult a C# book. There is nothing particularly complex about this code. –  James McNellis Aug 8 '10 at 18:51
    
I'll remember that next time. Thank you. –  edv4ld0 Aug 8 '10 at 19:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted
class someclass {
    public static void doIp(byte[] data)
    {
        uint j, k; // these are just counters, so uint is fine
        byte val;
        byte[] buf = new byte[8];  // syntax changed here
        byte p;                    // you end up using p simply as an offset from buf
        byte i = 8;

        for(i=0; i<8; i++)
        {
            val = data[i];
            p = 3;
            j = 4;

            do
            {
                for(k=0; k<=4; k+=4)
                {
                    buf[p+k] >>= 1;
                    if((val & 1) != 0) buf[p+k] |= 0x80; // must test against 0 explicitly in C#
                    val >>= 1;
                }
                p--;
            } while(--j != 0); // must test against 0 explicitly in C#
        }

        Array.Copy(buf, data, 8);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Close, but you need to copy using Array.Copy(buf, data, 8) at the last line, as data = buf only work on the local variables. –  dalle Aug 8 '10 at 19:02
    
Many, many thanks. –  edv4ld0 Aug 8 '10 at 19:04
    
@dalle, good catch. Fixed. Thanks. –  sblom Aug 8 '10 at 20:18
    
This was good C++ code, so it doesn't make for good, idiomatic C# code. –  Steven Sudit Aug 8 '10 at 21:17

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