Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
CREATE TABLE profile_category (
  id mediumint UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  pc_name char(255) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (id),
  UNIQUE KEY idx_name (name)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

This is one of the tables in database that is entirely in utf8 charset. The problem is here (and I didn't new about it until now) that index for pc_name column will triple times bigger, because MySQL reserves 3 bites for every char. In this case indexes will take much more space.

I cannot make shorter index, because I need this value to be unique. One of the solutions could be set pc_name char(255) CHARSET latin1 NOT NULL, but I dont't know if this is a problem or not. Is this is a good Idea, or are there any solutions that I don't know ?

Update: the pc_name column is validated in application to be valid utf8. And it allows non western characters. But in this case I can just make a trade of and allow only /[_A-Za-z]/ if the case is worth it.

Update 2: I tried to set pc_name to latin1 charset, but now I get exceptions like: Zend_Db_Statement_Exception: SQLSTATE[HY000]: General error: 1267 Illegal mix of collations (latin1_swedish_ci,IMPLICIT) and (utf8_general_ci,COERCIBLE) for operation '='

share|improve this question
    
Indexes are normally used to speed up queries rather than save disk space. –  Álvaro G. Vicario Aug 9 '10 at 7:54
    
"The extra index required can add significantly to the table’s total size—even if the column itself is small, and especially if the primary key is large—and is useless for anything but the foreign key checks." –  Ernest Aug 9 '10 at 8:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If pc_name is going to contain non-Western text then latin1 isn't going to be an option here - otherwise, go for it.

Not being a hardcore MySQL'er, I don't know if mixing InnoDB and MySQL tables is fraught with problems - if not, perhaps you could make this table a standard MySQL table and leave it as utf8?

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for answer. I will update my question. –  Ernest Aug 8 '10 at 19:46
    
As for InnoDB, I have another table profile.id column as foreign key. So I would like to stay with it. Not sure if data engines changes the mentioned problem. –  Ernest Aug 8 '10 at 19:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.