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Can someone tell me which data structure supports insert/delete/maximum operation in O(1)?

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5  
Is this homework? –  jtbandes Aug 8 '10 at 20:21
6  
Insert at where? Delete from where? O(1) is amortized or exact? –  KennyTM Aug 8 '10 at 20:22
2  
I don't think this is homework. –  Aryabhatta Aug 8 '10 at 20:24
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I guess it is a silly interview question. :) –  Andras Vass Aug 8 '10 at 21:22
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possible duplicate of design a stack such that getMinimum( ) should be O(1) –  Can Berk Güder Aug 10 '10 at 20:18

6 Answers 6

up vote 34 down vote accepted

This is a classical interview question, and is usually presented like this:

Devise a stack-like data structure that does push, pop and min (or max) operations in O(1) time. There are no space constraints.

The answer is, you use two stacks: the main stack, and a min (or max) stack.

So for example, after pushing 1,2,3,4,5 onto the stack, your stacks would look like this:

MAIN   MIN
+---+  +---+
| 5 |  | 1 |
| 4 |  | 1 |
| 3 |  | 1 |
| 2 |  | 1 |
| 1 |  | 1 |
+---+  +---+

However, if you were to push 5,4,3,2,1, the stacks would look like this:

MAIN   MIN
+---+  +---+
| 1 |  | 1 |
| 2 |  | 2 |
| 3 |  | 3 |
| 4 |  | 4 |
| 5 |  | 5 |
+---+  +---+

For 5,2,4,3,1 you would have:

MAIN   MIN
+---+  +---+
| 1 |  | 1 |
| 3 |  | 2 |
| 4 |  | 2 |
| 2 |  | 2 |
| 5 |  | 5 |
+---+  +---+

and so on.

You can also save some space by pushing to the min stack only when the minimum element changes, iff the items are known to be distinct.

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2  
-1: Same answer as Anurag's and does not actually answer the question (IMO). –  Aryabhatta Aug 8 '10 at 20:52
    
i went to interview for last week some folks asked me this question, i suggested priority queue. your answer seems to be correct –  realnumber Aug 8 '10 at 22:01
    
@Ram: Sorry, I disagree that this is the correct answer. (As you yourself do not know exactly what they were asking). The interpretation of constraining either the inserts or deletes is silly, IMO. Anyway, since this is your question, you are free to do as you please :-) –  Aryabhatta Aug 8 '10 at 22:18
    
You can also do the space saving even without knowing items are distinct. On pop, only pop the min stack if popped value == minStack.Peek() and (mainStack.Empty || popped != mainStack.Peek()) (after pop). It makes for a more expensive pop, but still in constant time complexity. –  Jon Hanna Aug 8 '10 at 23:15
    
@Moron: Agree. I don't think push/pop is equivalent to insert/delete. I think an infinite size random access storage (aka infinite size RAM) could do the job. To store integers, just set the corresponding bit to 1. For example, to store the elements [3, 4, 7], just set the 3rd, 4th and 7th bit in the infinite storage, resulting "01001100" in the 1st byte. Use another integer to store the maximum element (7 is stored in this case). Listing all the elements in the array is O(m) [m is the max. element], but inserting (setting the bit), deleting (unsetting the bit) and finding the maximum is O(1). –  Asuka Kenji - Siu Ching Pong - Aug 9 '10 at 10:03

@KennyTM's comment points out an important missing detail - insert where, and delete from where. So I am going to assume that you always want to insert and delete only from one end like a stack.

Insertion (push) and Delete (pop) are O(1).

To get Max in O(1), use an additional stack to record the current max which corresponds to the main stack.

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+1: I guess this was the "usual" interview question or homework involving two stacks / stack with two values (current, max) and insert/delete is rather push/pop. –  Andras Vass Aug 8 '10 at 20:32
    
@and: Why assume this is an interview question? Ram might well be just curious and not sure how changing the problem will help in that case. I would think if the order of inserts/deletes matters, OP would have mentioned that. -1: Till OP clarifies. –  Aryabhatta Aug 8 '10 at 20:34
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@Moron: because of the "homework" tag, the "which data structure supports" part - and I have already met this question worded misleadingly. :) Of course, as you have pointed out it could be that Ram is just curious. –  Andras Vass Aug 8 '10 at 20:40
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@Moron: to clarify: I have met this question with the same exact misleading wording. A guy told me that it is more interesting to watch for reactions. Applicant type #1 - think-outside-the-box guy: since the interviewer did not mention anything else, constrains delete/insert to last element, problem solved. Applicant type #2 - regular guy: goes on to explain how it is impossible and what the lower theoretical limit is with different data structures. Applicant type #3 - clueless. I believe I would be #2 as well without hints (like delete/insert is for the last element). :) –  Andras Vass Aug 8 '10 at 21:12
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"Insert where, delete from where". These questions are meaningless. The stated data structure defines operations insert(x), delete(x), top(). An implementation of these is free to store the elements anywhere it pleases. What matters is: 1) is the implementation correct?, and 2) are the bounds of the operations O(1), as required? Btw your answer is wrong, as others pointed out. –  Dimitris Andreou Aug 9 '10 at 0:16

If you are using only comparisons, you would be hard pressed to find such a data structure.

For instance you could insert n elements, get max, delete max etc and could sort numbers in O(n) time, while the theoretical lower bound is Omega(nlogn).

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It's not lower bound O(n log n), there are circuits that can sort in O(n) and algorithms implementable in C that work in O(n log log n) –  Dani Aug 8 '10 at 20:50
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@Dani: Did you read the first sentence of the answer? –  Aryabhatta Aug 8 '10 at 20:51
    
Thoretical lower bound is O(n) (with exponential space) –  Dani Aug 8 '10 at 23:30
    
@Dani, and a non-deterministic machine? :) –  Dimitris Andreou Aug 9 '10 at 0:18
    
If I only knew what it is –  Dani Aug 9 '10 at 16:15

The following solution uses O(1) extra memory and O(1) time for max, push and pop operations. Keep a variable max which will keep track of the current max element at any particular time. Lets utilize the fact that when max is updated, all the elements in the stack should be less than the new max element. When a push operation occurs and the new element(newElement) is greater than the current max we push the max + newElement in the stack and update max = newElement.

When we are doing a pop operation and we find that the current popped element is greater than the current max then we know that this is place where we had updated our stack to hold max+elem. So the actual element to be returned is max and max = poppedElem - max.

Following is a pseudo code for each of the operation for better insight.

Elem max;
void Push(Elem x){
    if x < max :
        push(x);
    else{
        push(x+max);
        max = x;
    }
}
Elem Pop(){
    Elem p = pop();
    if p < max:
        return p;
    else{
        max = p - max;
        return max;
    }
}
Elem Max(){
    return max;
}

push and pop are normal stack operations. Hope this helps.

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A hash table might support insert/delete in O(1), no clue about maximum though. You'd probably need to keep track of it yourself somehow.

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Maximum is O(N) for a simple hash table. –  KennyTM Aug 8 '10 at 20:26
    
It would be easy to amend a hashtable to keep track of the max, so I'm pretty sure this is along the right lines. –  Will A Aug 8 '10 at 20:27
    
@Will: But that will make delete O(N). –  KennyTM Aug 8 '10 at 20:28
    
@Will: Not really. How would you cater to deletes? What would you do if we happen to delete the maximum? –  Aryabhatta Aug 8 '10 at 20:29
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@KennyTM, @Moron very true - I engaged keyboard before brain again! :) –  Will A Aug 8 '10 at 20:34

Although @Can Berk Güder's answer is right. But if we have space constraint, we can do much better even if the elements are not distinct. For more details please see my answer Here with implementation in Java.

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