Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do you test if an NSString is empty? or all whitespace or nil? with a single method call?

share|improve this question
    
posible dup:stackoverflow.com/questions/899209/… –  thyrgle Aug 8 '10 at 21:58

7 Answers 7

up vote 70 down vote accepted

You can try something like this:

@implementation NSString (JRAdditions)

+ (BOOL)isStringEmpty:(NSString *)string {
   if([string length] == 0) { //string is empty or nil
       return YES;
   } 

   if(![[string stringByTrimmingCharactersInSet:[NSCharacterSet whitespaceAndNewlineCharacterSet]] length]) {
       //string is all whitespace
       return YES;
   }

   return NO;
}

@end

Check out the NSString reference on ADC.

share|improve this answer
    
how can i do all that with a single method call? –  Yazzmi Aug 8 '10 at 21:48
9  
@JacobRelkin, I don't think this quite correct. if the string is nil, then the method will never get called, so if you have: NSString *str = nil;BOOL isStrEmpty = [str isEmpty];, then isStrEmpty will be NO, as nil is the same as NO. I've used a category like this for a while, and it puzzles me that I haven't thought this before, so I may/likely be wrong. –  Jonathan. Nov 25 '12 at 18:38
2  
You could also make it a class category method instead of an instance category method - that way nil could be checked. + (BOOL)isEmptyString:(NSString*)string - [NSString isEmptyString:str] –  Josh Bruce Aug 16 '13 at 0:56
2  
or you could have made a method isPopulated as opposed to isEmpty –  Gabriele Petronella Aug 16 '13 at 10:54
2  
I made the very same mistake a while ago. The easier solution (for me at least) was to invert the method's logic and rename it to isNotEmpty. I do favor methods that use affirmative naming rather than negative, but in this case... oh, I assume I was too lazy to change every usage. –  jweyrich Oct 4 '13 at 19:31

This is what I use, an Extension to NSString:

+ (BOOL)isEmptyString:(NSString *)string;
// Returns YES if the string is nil or equal to @""
{
    // Note that [string length] == 0 can be false when [string isEqualToString:@""] is true, because these are Unicode strings.

    if (((NSNull *) string == [NSNull null]) || (string == nil) ) {
        return YES;
    }
    string = [string stringByTrimmingCharactersInSet: [NSCharacterSet whitespaceAndNewlineCharacterSet]];

    if ([string isEqualToString:@""]) {
        return YES;
    }

    return NO;  
}
share|improve this answer
4  
Instead of doing the final compare to @"" you should just see if the [string length] == 0 –  p.pad Mar 16 '12 at 16:26

I use,

+ (BOOL ) stringIsEmpty:(NSString *) aString {

    if ((NSNull *) aString == [NSNull null]) {
        return YES;
    }

    if (aString == nil) {
        return YES;
    } else if ([aString length] == 0) {
        return YES;
    } else {
        aString = [aString stringByTrimmingCharactersInSet: [NSCharacterSet whitespaceAndNewlineCharacterSet]];
        if ([aString length] == 0) {
            return YES;
        }
    }

    return NO;  
}

+ (BOOL ) stringIsEmpty:(NSString *) aString shouldCleanWhiteSpace:(BOOL)cleanWhileSpace {

    if ((NSNull *) aString == [NSNull null]) {
        return YES;
    }

    if (aString == nil) {
        return YES;
    } else if ([aString length] == 0) {
        return YES;
    } 

    if (cleanWhileSpace) {
        aString = [aString stringByTrimmingCharactersInSet: [NSCharacterSet whitespaceAndNewlineCharacterSet]];
        if ([aString length] == 0) {
            return YES;
        }
    }

    return NO;  
}
share|improve this answer

I'm using this define as it works with nil strings as well as empty strings:

#define STR_EMPTY(str)  \
    str.length == 0
share|improve this answer

I hate to throw another log on this exceptionally old fire, but I'm leery about editing someone else's answer - especially when it's the selected answer.

Jacob asked a follow up question: How can I do this with a single method call?

The answer is, by creating a category - which basically extends the functionality of a base Objective-C class - and writing a "shorthand" method for all the other code.

However, technically, a string with white space characters is not empty - it just doesn't contain any visible glyphs (for the last couple of years I've been using a method called isEmptyString: and converted today after reading this question, answer, and comment set).

To create a category go to Option+Click -> New File... (or File -> New -> File... or just command+n) -> choose Objective-C Category. Pick a name for the category (this will help namespace it and reduce possible future conflicts) - choose NSString from the "Category on" drop down - save the file somewhere. (Note: The file will automatically be named NSString+YourCategoryName.h and .m.)

I personally appreciate the self-documenting nature of Objective-C; therefore, I have created the following category method on NSString modifying my original isEmptyString: method and opting for a more aptly declared method (I trust the compiler to compress the code later - maybe a little too much).

Header (.h):

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface NSString (YourCategoryName)

/*! Strips the string of white space characters (inlcuding new line characters).
 @param string NSString object to be tested - if passed nil or @"" return will
     be negative
 @return BOOL if modified string length is greater than 0, returns YES; 
 otherwise, returns NO */
+ (BOOL)visibleGlyphsExistInString:(NSString *)string;

@end

Implementation (.m):

@implementation NSString (YourCategoryName)

+ (BOOL)visibleGlyphsExistInString:(NSString *)string
{
    // copying string should ensure retain count does not increase
    // it was a recommendation I saw somewhere (I think on stack),
    // made sense, but not sure if still necessary/recommended with ARC
    NSString *copy = [string copy];

    // assume the string has visible glyphs
    BOOL visibleGlyphsExist = YES;
    if (
        copy == nil
        || copy.length == 0
        || [[copy stringByTrimmingCharactersInSet:[NSCharacterSet whitespaceAndNewlineCharacterSet]] length] == 0
        ) {
        // if the string is nil, no visible characters would exist
        // if the string length is 0, no visible characters would exist
        // and, of course, if the length after stripping the white space
        // is 0, the string contains no visible glyphs
        visibleGlyphsExist = NO;

    }
    return visibleGlyphsExist;

}

@end

To call the method be sure to #import the NSString+MyCategoryName.h file into the .h or .m (I prefer the .m for categories) class where you are running this sort of validation and do the following:

NSString* myString = @""; // or nil, or tabs, or spaces, or something else
BOOL hasGlyphs = [NSString visibleGlyphsExistInString:myString];

Hopefully that covers all the bases. I remember when I first started developing for Objective-C the category thing was one of those "huh?" ordeals for me - but now I use them quite a bit to increase reusability.

Edit: And I suppose, technically, if we're stripping characters, this:

[[copy stringByTrimmingCharactersInSet:[NSCharacterSet whitespaceAndNewlineCharacterSet]] length] == 0

Is really all that is needed (it should do everything that category method does, including the copy), but I could be wrong on that score.

share|improve this answer
    
I've now converted to just that one line instead of the category method in all my code - works as expected; so, no need to create extra code to maintain. –  Josh Bruce Aug 20 '13 at 17:47

Based on the Jacob Relkin answer and Jonathan comment:

@implementation TextUtils

    + (BOOL)isEmpty:(NSString*) string {

        if([string length] == 0 || ![[string stringByTrimmingCharactersInSet:[NSCharacterSet whitespaceAndNewlineCharacterSet]] length]) {
            return YES;
        }

        return NO;
    }

    @end
share|improve this answer

Should be easier:

if (![[string stringByReplacingOccurencesOfString:@" " withString:@""] length]) { NSLog(@"This string is empty"); }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.