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Specs

GHC 6.12.1

Mac OS X 10.6.4 x64

MacBook Pro

Problem

I'm having trouble using let syntax. The following code refuses to compile:

module Main where

main = let x = 1
        y = 2
        z = 3
    in putStrLn $ "X = " ++ show x ++ "\nY = " ++ show y ++ "\nZ = " ++ show z

I tried tabbing in y = 2 and z = 3 even more. No dice.

(Undesirable) Solutions

The only way I've gotten the code to compile is either

  1. Replacing hard tabs with spaces.
  2. Replacing the let clause with a where clause.
share|improve this question
1  
never use tabs with haskell, always use spaces. Tabs in haskell are defined to be 8 spaces, which is a lot more than people often expect/set their editor to, so it is always advised that you use spaces. Any decent editor will allow you to make tabs produce spaces. –  Axman6 Oct 30 '10 at 1:58
    
I found this an excellent visual aid, and an excellent guide on the subject overall: http://echo.rsmw.net/n00bfaq.html#visualaid –  Brandon Sep 2 '11 at 0:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Saizan on #haskell explains that the assignments in a let expression have to align, not let itself. As long as the assignments line up, it's okay to use hard tabs or soft tabs.

Correct code:

module Main where

main = let
        x = 1
        y = 2
        z = 3
    in putStrLn $ "X = " ++ show x ++ "\nY = " ++ show y ++ "\nZ = " ++ show z
share|improve this answer
1  
I found that the bindings (x,y,z) have to align vertically as opposed to assignment signs (=) of the 3 bindings which may be hard to see with this example. –  ssanj Jan 30 at 3:59

You simply can't control indentation correctly with tabs because the size of a tab is undefined.

Therefore, don't use tabs in Haskell. They're evil.

share|improve this answer
2  
Or, for things that need to have a different level of indentation, use a new line. E.g., put let on one line and x = 1 on the next. Then tabs are no problem. –  yfeldblum Aug 9 '10 at 14:52
    
Neil, I beg to differ (see my answer). A guy on #haskell was able to help me construct a compiling, hard-tabbed version. In fact, Justice's answer is correct. –  mcandre Aug 10 '10 at 13:31
    
I learned my lesson the hard way! I knew tabs were horrible but still used just because it never gave me an issue before. If you're like me save yourself a big future headache and take this advice, now! –  MasterMastic Apr 22 at 18:11

Indent each declaration in the let-block to the same degree. Also good form is to indent the 'in' and 'let' to the same level. Eg..

main = let x = 1
           y = 2
           z = 3
       in putStrLn $ "X = " ++ show x ++ "\nY = " ++ show y ++ "\nZ = " ++ show z
share|improve this answer
    
How do I do this with hard tabs? –  mcandre Aug 9 '10 at 1:28
8  
Why do you want to use hard tabs? They're mildly okay in languages that don't use indentation for meaning, but they are just going to make your life difficult in languages like Haskell or Python. Like they are right now. –  jrockway Aug 9 '10 at 1:50
4  
Python handles hard tabs excellently. One time, I had trouble coding Python through a web SSH client because the client couldn't insert tabs. I use hard tabs because I hate having to forcibly reindent other people's code to my preferred indentation width. Hard tabs don't have that problem, since text editors can view hard tabs at any width. –  mcandre Aug 10 '10 at 13:29

If you insist on TAB characters in your source, the following compiles:

module Main where

main =
    let x = 1
        y = 2
        z = 3
    in putStrLn $ "X = " ++ show x ++ "\nY = " ++ show y ++ "\nZ = " ++ show z

where all leading whitespace is either one or two TABs, and the whitespace between let and x = 1 is also a TAB. Viewed in vi's list mode to make TABs and line-ends explicit:

module Main where$
$
main =$
^Ilet^Ix = 1$
^I^Iy = 2$
^I^Iz = 3$
^Iin putStrLn $ "X = " ++ show x ++ "\nY = " ++ show y ++ "\nZ = " ++ show z$

Your life will be much simpler and your code prettier if you switch to spaces.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I don't think I want to remember to tab between let and x every time. Also, any code I post will likely cause errors since readers will assume that there's an ordinary space there. –  mcandre Aug 10 '10 at 13:27
    
Hence why hard tabs makes your code harder to code and read! –  adamse Aug 11 '10 at 16:49

Personally, I put semicolon at the end of each line

module Main where

main = let x = 1 ;
           y = 2 ;
           z = 3 
in putStrLn $ "X = " ++ show x ++ "\nY = " ++ show y ++ "\nZ = " ++ show z
share|improve this answer
    
It will work with semicolon, but I won't use since the language works fine out it. Just for indentation, use spaces instead of tabs (or tabs correctly). –  Jaider Nov 15 '12 at 19:29

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