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Recently there has been a paper floating around by Vinay Deolalikar at HP Labs which claims to have proved that P != NP. Could someone explain how this proof works for us less mathematically inclined people?

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Try mathoverflow.net. –  jtbandes Aug 9 '10 at 2:30
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It's a 100-page cutting-edge research paper that's likely to attract a major prize (assuming it's correct). I haven't got the week (or month or however long) it would take for me to understand it, let alone explain it. –  Donal Fellows Aug 9 '10 at 2:33
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Off-topic? Are you all mad? P vs NP is the quintessential (which I assume means five times as essential as any other essential thing :-) CompSci problem. It doesn't get any more programming related than that (despite my assertion that it won't matter much to the vast majority of us). Voting to reopen. –  paxdiablo Aug 9 '10 at 2:42
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@gnovice, I'm going to argue the other way (my vote was cast long ago and I don't get to revote) but I thought I'd explain. This question seems to fit quite well point 4 of the FAQ "matters that are unique to the programming profession" since P/NP is primarily a computability issue. And you're right that discussion questions are inappropriate ("Avoid asking questions that ... require extended discussion") but I don't believe this is one of those. It specifically asked for a precis, not a discussion. In fact, MichealA's answer seem to reduce it quite well without discussion (+1 for him). –  paxdiablo Aug 9 '10 at 8:03
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A "explanation for mortal of a N page proof of [hard, hard problem]" is also known as a book --- something like Gödel, Esher Bach for Gödel's Incompleteness Theorem. It is not something you can manage in an SO post. –  dmckee Aug 9 '10 at 18:58

7 Answers 7

up vote 55 down vote accepted

OK so i've only scanned through the paper but heres a rough summary of how it all hangs together.

From page 86 of the paper.

... polynomial time algorithms succeed by successively “breaking up” the problem into smaller subproblems that are joined to each other through conditional independence. Consequently, polynomial time algorithms cannot solve problems in regimes where blocks whose order is the same as the underlying problem instance require simultaneous resolution.

Other parts of the paper show that certain NP problems can not be broken up in this manner. Thus NP/= P

Much of the paper is spent defining conditional independence and proving these two points.

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+1. Somewhat better than my (facetious) answer but I can't really believe you waded through it to come up with that :-) –  paxdiablo Aug 9 '10 at 8:04
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@paxdiablo: I've got a solid maths background, so I took your comment as bit of a challenge. Though its not my area of expertise I also found it an interesting read (though I wont claim more than a skimming of the details) –  Michael Anderson Aug 9 '10 at 8:12
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Thank you - and couldn't be happier that you posted this before the question got closed (wrongly in my opinion...) –  romkyns Aug 13 '10 at 9:49
    
@paxdiablo: no, your answer was more informative, sorry Michael but I don't understand what you're talking about :) –  Patrick Aug 13 '10 at 11:10

Dick Lipton has a nice blog entry about the paper and his first impressions of it. Unfortunately, it also is technical. From what I can understand, Deolalikar's main innovation seems to be to use some concepts from statistical physics and finite model theory and tie them to the problem.

I'm with Rex M with this one, some results, mostly mathematical ones cannot be expressed to people who lack the technical mastery.

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I liked this ( http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn19287-p--np-its-bad-news-for-the-power-of-computing.html ):

His argument revolves around a particular task, the Boolean satisfiability problem, which asks whether a collection of logical statements can all be simultaneously true or whether they contradict each other. This is known to be an NP problem.

Deolalikar claims to have shown that there is no program which can complete it quickly from scratch, and that it is therefore not a P problem. His argument involves the ingenious use of statistical physics, as he uses a mathematical structure that follows many of the same rules as a random physical system.

The effects of the above can be quite significant:

If the result stands, it would prove that the two classes P and NP are not identical, and impose severe limits on what computers can accomplish – implying that many tasks may be fundamentally, irreducibly complex.

For some problems – including factorisation – the result does not clearly say whether they can be solved quickly. But a huge sub-class of problems called "NP-complete" would be doomed. A famous example is the travelling salesman problem – finding the shortest route between a set of cities. Such problems can be checked quickly, but if P ≠ NP then there is no computer program that can complete them quickly from scratch.

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Except for the mention of statistical physics, this has nothing to do with the proof structure here, and is just general blather (but correct) about P versus NP. –  ShreevatsaR Aug 12 '10 at 7:39

This is my understanding of the proof technique: he uses first order logic to characterize all polynomial time algorithms, and then shows that for large SAT problems with certain properties that no polynomial time algorithm can determine their satisfiability.

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The second part ("and then…") is more or less the statement that P≠NP. :-) –  ShreevatsaR Aug 9 '10 at 21:17

One other way of thinking about it, which may be entirely wrong, but is my first impression as I'm reading it on the first pass, is that we think of assigning/clearing terms in circuit satisfaction as forming and breaking clusters of 'ordered structure', and that he's then using statistical physics to show that there isn't enough speed in the polynomial operations to perform those operations in a particular "phase space" of operations, because these "clusters" end up being too far apart.

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The proof is being discussed further here: michaelnielsen.org/polymath1/… –  John with waffle Aug 12 '10 at 14:59

Such proof would have to cover all classes of algorithms ... like continuous global optimization. For example in 3SAT problem we have to valuate variables to fulfill all alternatives of triples of these variables or their negations – look that x OR y can be changed into optimizing

((x-1)^2+y^2)((x-1)^2+(y-1)^2)(x^2+(y-1)^2)

and analogously seven terms for alternative of three variables. Finding global minimum of sum of such polynomials for all terms, would solve our problem. (source)

It's going out of standard combinatorial techniques to continuous world using gradient methods, local minims removing methods, evolutionary algorithms ... it's completely different kingdom - numerical analysis - I don't believe such proof could really cover (?)

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False. If one NP-complete problem is not in P, then the question is answered. –  Andres Jaan Tack Aug 12 '10 at 10:47
    
You've taken me wrong: I'm talking about class of approaches - if a different one works for 3SAT, all these problems are in P. Continuous global optimization approach makes that we do not longer work on true/false ... but on continuous variables - watching gradient flow in continuous landscape instead of working on discrete sets. –  skeptic Aug 12 '10 at 11:04
    
As I understand it, he classifies all possible algorithms to solve P-problems in polynomial time, then proves that none of them solves 3SAT. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Aug 12 '10 at 14:41
    
All possible algorithms working on possible solutions ... but here we work literally between them ... I've worked on both complexity and numerical analysis, but I have no idea how to even calculate complexity of such complex continuous global optimization problems??? –  skeptic Aug 13 '10 at 10:08

It's worth noting that with proofs, "the devil is in the detail". The high level overview is obviously something like:

Some some sort of relationship between items, show that this relationship implies X and that implies Y and thus my argument is shown.

I mean, it may be via Induction or any other form of proving things, but what I'm saying is the high level overview is useless. There is no point explaining it. Although the question itself relates to computer science, it is best left to mathematicians (thought it is certainly incredibly interesting).

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A note: if the high level overview is useless, then you may have gone too high to generate an overview. –  RCIX Aug 10 '10 at 4:50

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