Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I already "did" this for IPv4;

$ip = '127.0.0.1'; // example
$ip = explode('.',$ip);
if( count($ip) != 4 ) $ip = array(0,0,0,0); // wrong ip format, default to 0.0.0.0
return chr($ip[0]) . chr($ip[1]) . chr($ip[2]) . chr($ip[3]);

I need to do the above for IPv6 as well. Reading through the IPv6 spec, (I admit I didn't read all of it), I saw several oddities ("exceptions") such as a set of 0 could be compressed to a double colon: ":0000:0000"=>"::" (if my understanding was correct). I also saw how you can have an IPv4-style string inside an IPv6 string: 0:0:0:0:0:0:127.0.0.1

Let's start by saying I've no freakin idea where to start.


Thanks to Alvaro, now I've got a pure-PHP implementation of inet_pton:

/**
 * @copyright   2004-2007 Aidan Lister <aidan@php.net>, Arpad Ray <arpad@php.net>
 * @link        http://php.net/inet_pton
 * @author      Arpad Ray <arpad@php.net>
 */
function php_compat_inet_pton($address) {
    $r = ip2long($address);
    if ($r !== false && $r != -1) return pack('N', $r);
    $delim_count = substr_count($address, ':');
    if ($delim_count < 1 || $delim_count > 7) return false;
    $r = explode(':', $address);
    $rcount = count($r);
    if (($doub = array_search('', $r, 1)) !== false) {
        $length = (!$doub || $doub == $rcount - 1 ? 2 : 1);
        array_splice($r, $doub, $length, array_fill(0, 8 + $length - $rcount, 0));
    }
    $r = array_map('hexdec', $r);
    array_unshift($r, 'n*');
    $r = call_user_func_array('pack', $r);
    return $r;
}

Problem is, I can't quite understand what it's doing. The issue is, I can't just use such a function since (for one thing) I know it's packing the IP in a differnt format than I'm doing (or want to).

share|improve this question
    
I've never worked with IPv6 (I didn't even knew that packed representation wasn't unique) but it could probably help if you gave an example of mismatched outputs and/or you'd explain what part of the function you don't understand. –  Álvaro G. Vicario Aug 9 '10 at 9:51
    
I have my "own" packing mechanism. The usual packing algorithm goes to adding up the bytes, for example, RGB 0,255,255 => 0+255*256+255*256*256 = 16 776 960 = 0xFFFF00 (hex) = 00FFFF (html RGB). My "own" is simply a direct binary representation of that string, which doesn't care about endianness (making it cross-platform etc). –  Christian Aug 9 '10 at 10:13
    
The problem is that I don't understand that function and/or what it does, therefor I can't rely on it's output (I don't just copy&paste code ;) ). –  Christian Aug 9 '10 at 10:15
    
I've tried to explain the complete function but, seriously, you need some PHP basics to do this kind of task. Enjoy! –  Álvaro G. Vicario Aug 9 '10 at 11:47
    
Alvaro, I'm well aware what those functions do, it's the second issue, the "why", which I don't understand. All in all, that function doesn't do what I need, nor can I understand how it works on IPv6 (which was what I saw it useful). :( –  Christian Aug 9 '10 at 13:33

2 Answers 2

See ip2long() and inet_pton().

Edit: There's a pure PHP implementation of inet_pton in the PHP_Compat package.

Update

I've commented the function for you. Please note that I don't have the faintest idea about IPv6 address format so I can roughly tell you what it does but not why.

<?php

/**
 * @copyright   2004-2007 Aidan Lister <aidan@php.net>, Arpad Ray <arpad@php.net>
 * @link        http://php.net/inet_pton
 * @author      Arpad Ray <arpad@php.net>
 */
function php_compat_inet_pton($address) {
    // Convert to IPv4 (numeric representation)
    $r = ip2long($address);

    // ip2long() will return FALSE if it's an invalid IPv4 address (or -1 if PHP earlier than 5.0.0)
    if ($r !== false && $r != -1)
        // if it didn't, then it *is* a valid IPv4 address
        // We pack the number as unsigned long (always 32 bit, big endian byte order) and we're done
        return pack('N', $r);

    // Count the number of delimiters (:)
    $delim_count = substr_count($address, ':');

    // If none or more than 7, the address is not valid
    if ($delim_count < 1 || $delim_count > 7) return false;

    // Create an array with the delimited substrings
    $r = explode(':', $address);

    // Count the number of items
    $rcount = count($r);

    // If we have empty items, fetch the position of the first one
    if (($doub = array_search('', $r, 1)) !== false) {

        // We fill a $length variable with this rule:
        // - If it's the first or last item ---> 2
        // - Otherwhise                     ---> 1
        $length = (!$doub || $doub == $rcount - 1 ? 2 : 1);

        // Remove a portion of the array and replace it with something else
        array_splice($r,

            // We skip items before the empty one
            $doub,

            // We remove one or two items
            $length,

            // We replace each removed value with zeros
            array_fill(0, 8 + $length - $rcount, 0)

        );
    }

    // We convert each item from hexadecimal to decimal
    $r = array_map('hexdec', $r);

    // We add 'n*' at the beginning of the array (just a trick to use pack on all the items)
    array_unshift($r, 'n*');

    // We pack all the items as unsigned shorts (always 16 bit, big endian byte order)
    $r = call_user_func_array('pack', $r);

    // Return the resulting string
    return $r;
}
share|improve this answer
    
According to docs, ip2long only works for ipv4 address. inet_pton() works for IPv6 only when PHP is built to support IPv6. Due to the nature of my application, I cannot assume PHP does support IPv6. –  Christian Aug 9 '10 at 8:18
    
Edited my post with more info. –  Christian Aug 9 '10 at 9:33
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I will use the following URL to write the function I need:

http://www.zytrax.com/tech/protocols/ipv6.html

I will edit back with the function code.

Edit Here it goes: hope people find this useful.

class Connect {
    /**
     * Returns the IP in it's fullest format.
     * @example
     *          ::1              => 0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0001
     *          220F::127.0.0.1  => 220F:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:7F00:0001
     *          2F:A1::1         => 002F:00A1:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0001
     * @param string $ip Original/compressed/packed IPv6.
     * @return string Full IP.
     */
    protected static function fixIpv6($ip){
        // fix double colon
        if(strpos($ip,'::')!==false)$ip=str_replace('::',str_repeat(':',9-substr_count($ip,':')),$ip);
        // fix each slot
        $ip=explode(':',$ip);
        foreach($ip as $k=>$v){
            // fix empty/compressed slots
            $ip[$k]=$v=str_pad($v,4,'0',STR_PAD_LEFT);
            // fix ipv4-style slot
            if(strpos($v,'.')!==false){
                // initially empty buffer
                $ip[$k]='';
                // replace each number(byte) with a two-digit hex representation
                foreach(explode('.',$v) as $v2){
                    $v=dechex(min((int)$v2,255));
                    if(strlen($v)==1)$v='0'.$v;
                    $ip[$k].=$v;
                }
                // add colon in between two pairs(bytes) (FFFFFFFF=>FFFF:FFFF)
                $ip[$k]=implode(':',str_split($ip[$k],4));
            }
        }
        return strtoupper(implode(':',$ip));
    }
    /**
     * Compresses an IP to it's binary representation.
     * @param string $ip A well-formatted full IPv4 or IPv6 address.
     * @return string Binary representation of address.
     */
    public static function compressIp($ip){
        if(strpos($ip,':')!==false){ // ipv6
        $ip=str_split(str_replace(':','',self::fixIpv6($ip)),2);
        foreach($ip as $k=>$v)$ip[$k]=chr(hexdec($v));
        return implode('',$ip);
        }elseif(strpos($ip,'.')!==false){ // ipv4
            $ip=explode('.',$ip);
            if(count($ip)!=4)$ip=array(0,0,0,0);
            return chr($ip[0]).chr($ip[1]).chr($ip[2]).chr($ip[3]);
        }else throw new Exception('Unrecognized IP format: '.MB_SECURITY::snohtml($ip));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
For the example addresses, your function returns the same values as php_compat_inet_pton() except for 220F::127.0.0.1, where it returns an 144 bit binary string. –  Álvaro G. Vicario Aug 10 '10 at 6:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.