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I have read lots of information about page caching and partial page caching in a MVC application. However, I would like to know how you would cache data.

In my scenario I will be using LINQ to Entities (entity framework). On the first call to GetNames (or whatever the method is) I want to grab the data from the database. I want to save the results in cache and on the second call to use the cached version if it exists.

Can anyone show an example of how this would work, where this should be implemented (model?) and if it would work.

I have seen this done in traditional ASP.NET apps , typically for very static data.

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8 Answers 8

up vote 42 down vote accepted

Reference the System.Web dll in your model and use System.Web.Caching.Cache

    public string[] GetNames()
    {
      string[] names = null;
      if(Cache["names"] == null)
      {
        names = DB.GetNames();
        Cache["names"] = names;
      }
      else
      {
        names = Cache["names"];
      }
      return names;
    }

A bit simplified but I guess that would work. This is not MVC specific and I have always used this method for caching data.

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73  
I don't recommend this solution: in the return, you might get a null object again, because it's re-reading in the cache and it might have been dropped from the cache already. I'd rather do: public string[] GetNames() { string[] noms = Cache["names"]; if(noms == null) { noms = DB.GetNames(); Cache["names"] = noms; } return (noms); } –  Oli Jul 8 '09 at 15:30
    
I agree with Oli.. getting the results from the actual call to the DB is better than getting them from the cache –  CodeClimber Jul 8 '09 at 21:48
    
Does this work with the DB.GetNames().AsQueryable method of delaying the query? –  Chase Florell Aug 9 '10 at 21:56
    
Not unless you change return value from string[] to IEnumerable<string> –  terjetyl Aug 10 '10 at 8:55
3  
If you don't set expiration..when does cache expire by default? –  Chaka Sep 27 '13 at 13:58

Here's a nice and simple cache helper class/service I use:

using System.Runtime.Caching;  

public class InMemoryCache: ICacheService
{
    public T GetOrSet<T>(string cacheKey, Func<T> getItemCallback) where T : class
    {
        T item = MemoryCache.Default.Get(cacheKey) as T;
        if (item == null)
        {
            item = getItemCallback();
            MemoryCache.Default.Add(cacheKey, item, DateTime.Now.AddMinutes(10));
        }
        return item;
    }
}

interface ICacheService
{
    T GetOrSet<T>(string cacheKey, Func<T> getItemCallback) where T : class;
}

Usage:

cacheProvider.GetOrSet("cache key", (delegate method if cache is empty));

Cache provider will check if there's anything by the name of "cache id" in the cache, and if there's not, it will call a delegate method to fetch data and store it in cache.

Example:

var products=cacheService.GetOrSet("catalog.products", ()=>productRepository.GetAll())
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3  
I've adapted this so that the caching mechanism is used per user session by using HttpContext.Current.Session instead. I've also put a Cache property on my BaseController class so its easy access and updated the constructor allow for DI for unit testing. Hope this helps. –  WestDiscGolf Jan 8 '10 at 12:23
2  
This class shouldn't depend on HttpContext. I simplified it just for example purpose here. Cache object must be inserted through constructor - it can be replaced then with other caching mechanisms . All this is achieved with IoC/DI, along with static (singleton) life cycle. –  Hrvoje Hudo Jul 26 '10 at 11:12
1  
This is a basic setup that will work. There are only two things I don't like about it: it requires the code know about both the repository and the caching and it also requires that you know the cache key when asking for the data. This means that you run the risk of having two keys for the same data. Also, it is a pain to look up the key. The caching should be baked in and automated somewhere. –  Brendan Enrick Jun 3 '11 at 20:56
3  
@Brendan - and worse still, it has magic strings in place for the cache keys, rather than inferring them from the method name and parameters. –  ssmith Jun 3 '11 at 20:58
3  
This is an awesome low level solution. Like others have alluded to, you'd want to wrap this in a type safe, domain-specific class. Accessing this directly in your controllers would be a maintenance nightmare because of the magic strings. –  Josh Noe Aug 1 '13 at 16:15

I'm referring to TT's post and suggest the following approach:

Reference the System.Web dll in your model and use System.Web.Caching.Cache

public string[] GetNames()
{ 
    var noms = Cache["names"];
    if(noms == null) 
    {    
        noms = DB.GetNames();
        Cache["names"] = noms; 
    }

    return ((string[])noms);
}

You should not return a value re-read from the cache, since you'll never know if at that specific moment it is still in the cache. Even if you inserted it in the statement before, it might already be gone or has never been added to the cache - you just don't know.

So you add the data read from the database and return it directly, not re-reading from the cache.

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But doesn't the line Cache["names"] = noms; put in the cache? –  Omar Jan 19 '10 at 17:16
2  
@Baddie Yes it does. But this example is different to the first Oli is referring to, because he doesn't access the cache again - the problem is that just doing: return (string[])Cache["names"]; .. COULD result in a null value being returned, because it COULD have expired. It's not likely, but it can happen. This example is better, because we store the actual value returned from the db in memory, cache that value, and then return that value, not the value re-read from the cache. –  jamiebarrow Nov 2 '10 at 16:19

Steve Smith did two great blog posts which demonstrate how to use his CachedRepository pattern in ASP.NET MVC. It uses the repository pattern effectively and allows you to get caching without having to change your existing code.

http://ardalis.com/Introducing-the-CachedRepository-Pattern

http://ardalis.com/building-a-cachedrepository-via-strategy-pattern

In these two posts he shows you how to set up this pattern and also explains why it is useful. By using this pattern you get caching without your existing code seeing any of the caching logic. Essentially you use the cached repository as if it were any other repository.

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1  
Great posts! Thanks for sharing!! –  Mark Good Sep 22 '11 at 12:30
    
thanks for sharing these! Exactly what I was looking for. –  Tejas Sharma Jun 26 '13 at 18:52
    
Links dead as of 2013-08-31. –  CBono Aug 31 '13 at 15:51
1  
Links do work again. I guess now they are undead :) –  slawek Oct 11 '13 at 10:06
2  

AppFabric Caching is distributed and an in-memory caching technic that stores data in key-value pairs using physical memory across multiple servers. AppFabric provides performance and scalability improvements for .NET Framework applications. Concepts and Architecture

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This is specific to Azure, not ASP.NET MVC in general. –  Henry C Apr 29 at 9:51

I use two classes. First one the cache core object:

public class Cacher<TValue>
    where TValue : class
{
    #region Properties
    private Func<TValue> _init;
    public string Key { get; private set; }
    public TValue Value
    {
        get
        {
            var item = HttpRuntime.Cache.Get(Key) as TValue;
            if (item == null)
            {
                item = _init();
                HttpContext.Current.Cache.Insert(Key, item);
            }
            return item;
        }
    }
    #endregion

    #region Constructor
    public Cacher(string key, Func<TValue> init)
    {
        Key = key;
        _init = init;
    }
    #endregion

    #region Methods
    public void Refresh()
    {
        HttpRuntime.Cache.Remove(Key);
    }
    #endregion
}

Second one is list of cache objects:

public static class Caches
{
    static Caches()
    {
        Languages = new Cacher<IEnumerable<Language>>("Languages", () =>
                                                          {
                                                              using (var context = new WordsContext())
                                                              {
                                                                  return context.Languages.ToList();
                                                              }
                                                          });
    }
    public static Cacher<IEnumerable<Language>> Languages { get; private set; }
}
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Extending @Hrvoje Hudo's answer...

Code:

using System;
using System.Runtime.Caching;

public class InMemoryCache : ICacheService
{
    public TValue Get<TValue>(string cacheKey, int durationInMinutes, Func<TValue> getItemCallback) where TValue : class
    {
        TValue item = MemoryCache.Default.Get(cacheKey) as TValue;
        if (item == null)
        {
            item = getItemCallback();
            MemoryCache.Default.Add(cacheKey, item, DateTime.Now.AddMinutes(durationInMinutes));
        }
        return item;
    }

    public TValue Get<TValue, TId>(string cacheKeyFormat, TId id, int durationInMinutes, Func<TId, TValue> getItemCallback) where TValue : class
    {
        string cacheKey = string.Format(cacheKeyFormat, id);
        TValue item = MemoryCache.Default.Get(cacheKey) as TValue;
        if (item == null)
        {
            item = getItemCallback(id);
            MemoryCache.Default.Add(cacheKey, item, DateTime.Now.AddMinutes(durationInMinutes));
        }
        return item;
    }
}

interface ICacheService
{
    TValue Get<TValue>(string cacheKey, Func<TValue> getItemCallback) where TValue : class;
    TValue Get<TValue, TId>(string cacheKeyFormat, TId id, Func<TId, TValue> getItemCallback) where TValue : class;
}

Examples

Single item caching (when each item is cached based on its ID because caching the entire catalog for the item type would be too intensive).

Product product = cache.Get("product_{0}", productId, 10, productData.getProductById);

Caching all of something

IEnumerable<Categories> categories = cache.Get("categories", 20, categoryData.getCategories);

Why TId

The second helper is especially nice because most data keys are not composite. Additional methods could be added if you use composite keys often. In this way you avoid doing all sorts of string concatenation or string.Formats to get the key to pass to the cache helper. It also makes passing the data access method easier because you don't have to pass the ID into the wrapper method... the whole thing becomes very terse and consistant for the majority of use cases.

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Your interface definitions are missing the "durationInMinutes" param. ;-) –  Tech0 May 11 at 12:48

You can also try and use the caching built into ASP MVC:

Add the following attribute to the controller method you'd like to cache:

[OutputCache(Duration=10)]

In this case the ActionResult of this will be cached for 10 seconds.

More on this here

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3  
OutputCache is for the rendering of Action , the question was in relation to caching data not the page. –  Coolcoder Dec 11 '08 at 14:22

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