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Anyone know how to assign stdClass value to variable?

I have a stdClass object and when I print it using var_dump($userdetails->emailaddress), it does print out the value as String(31)"asdas.@fsdf.com";

but when I try to assign the object value to variable, lets say:

$to = $userdetails->emailaddress; 

the $to value become NULL ...

Anyone can help ?

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1  
That should work fine. For example, try: php -r '$x = new stdClass; $x->foo = "bar"; $foo = $x->foo; var_dump($foo);' It will print "bar". Paste your actual code, there's probably something else wrong with it. –  reko_t Aug 9 '10 at 10:39
    
This should work. Can you provide a complete example that displays the incorrect behavior? Have you checked that it's not an identifier case issue (such as $userDetails instead of $userdetails) ? –  Victor Nicollet Aug 9 '10 at 10:41

3 Answers 3

I think there nothing wrong / prevent from assign value from stdClass to variable. Pls check the spelling of the code.

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That sounds like you are doing something wrong, because

$obj = new StdClass;
$obj->email = 'foo@example.com';
$to = $obj->email;
var_dump($to); // string(15) "foo@example.com"

Note that variables and object members in PHP are case sensitive (unlike functions and methods), so

$to = $obj->eMail;
var_dump($to); // NULL

However, in this case you also receive a PHP Notice

Notice: Undefined property: stdClass::$eMail

It is good practise to enable error_reporting(-1) and the PHP.ini directives display_errors and display_startup_errors on development machines.


Since it's a CW. feel free to use this space for further debugging tips

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Is the var public or not?

If the class is made like:

class Example
{
    public $emailaddress;

    public function example()
    {
        #do something
    }  

}

Then I can't see why there would be an issue.

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2  
It's a StdClass so any other visibility than public should not apply –  Gordon Aug 9 '10 at 10:42
    
Ah, I have never used a StdClass so I just assumed it was an example name. My bad blush –  Dorjan Aug 9 '10 at 16:30

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