Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's say I've this a checkbox and a div that contains elements that I want to hide/display depending on the checkbox being checked or not.

<input type = "checkbox" id = "myCheckbox"/>
<div id = "display-hide">
  //Contains more elements
</div>

Now, here is the JQuery script that does the trick.

<script type = "text/javascript">
  $(function () {
    $("#myCheckbox").click(function(){
        $("#display-hide").toggle(this.checked);
     });
      $("#display-hide").hide();
  });    
</script>

The first time I access the page, everything works fine (i.e. div is hidden - when I check the checkbox, the div is displayed).

BUT, when I come back to the page (to edit, for instance), no-matter the value of the checkbox (checked or not), the div is hidden first. The div becomes only visible after I uncheck then check again.

I guess that because of this statement:

$("#display-hide").hide();

Is there anyway to verify the value of the checkbox and hide/show the div accordingly?

Thanks for helping

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Instead of this:

$("#display-hide").hide();

You can use .triggerHandler(), like this:

$("#myCheckbox").triggerHandler('click');

This executes the click handler your just bound without actually executing a click on the box, so it makes the initial state match, without interfering. Overall it looks like this:

$("#myCheckbox").click(function(){
  $("#display-hide").toggle(this.checked);
}).triggerHandler('click');

You can give it a try here

share|improve this answer
1  
i like it more than .is(":checked") –  KoolKabin Aug 9 '10 at 11:06
    
Well, this Javascript businness is usually hard to master. I need more focus on that. It working perfectly now. Thanks very much. –  Richard77 Aug 9 '10 at 11:13
    
@Richard - Welcome :) And btw you're doing much better even in the short example than a lot of developers, e.g. you're using a DOM property, this.checked where it's available. This is absolutely the right thing to do, no need to go through 10 methods to get a property that's right there, that alone many people can't get through their heads...you're already doing it correctly :) –  Nick Craver Aug 9 '10 at 11:18
    
Well, wait and see how I can be dumb when it comes to Javascript (lol!). –  Richard77 Aug 9 '10 at 11:32
    
Thanks for the link –  Richard77 Aug 9 '10 at 12:06

I think you should edit a little in your code

script type = "text/javascript">
  $(function () {
    $("#myCheckbox").click(function(){
        $("#display-hide").toggle(this.checked);
     });
     if($("#myCheckbox").attr("checked"))
     {
          $("#display-hide").show();
     }
     else
     {
          $("#display-hide").hide();
     }
  });    
</script>
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.