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In C++ why can’t I write a for() loop like this: for( int i = 1, double i2 = 0; …

A C developer would write this:

int myIndex;
for (myIndex=0;myIndex<10;++myIndex) ...

A C++ developer would write this to prevent the loop variable from leaking outside the loop:

for (int myIndex=0;myIndex<10;++myIndex) ...

However, if you have 2 loop variables, you cannot do this anymore. The following doesn't compile:

for (int myIndex=0,MyElement *ptr=Pool->First;ptr;++myIndex,ptr=ptr->next) ...

The comma operator does not allow two variables to be defined this way, so we have to write it like this:

int myIndex;
MyElement *ptr;
for (myIndex=0,ptr=Pool->First;ptr;++myIndex,ptr=ptr->next) ...

Which defeats the advantage of having real loop-local variables.

A solution could be to put the whole construction between braces, like this:

{
int myIndex;
MyElement *ptr;
for (myIndex=0,ptr=Pool->First;ptr;++myIndex,ptr=ptr->next) ...
}

But this is hardly more elegant.

Isn't there a better way of doing this in C++ (or C++0x)?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by jpalecek, ptomato, GManNickG, Matthieu M., Magnus Hoff Aug 9 '10 at 13:25

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Why would a C programmer necessarily put the variable above the loop? – GManNickG Aug 9 '10 at 12:46
7  
@GMan Declaring it inside the for statement is only valid since C99, IIRC – Wim Aug 9 '10 at 12:47
7  
@Wim: Which was 11 years ago. :) – GManNickG Aug 9 '10 at 12:54
3  
As myIndex is not part of the conditional test I personally think it is bad style to put in inside the for(;;) it just makes the code hard to read. – Loki Astari Aug 9 '10 at 13:24
up vote 22 down vote accepted

You just have to understand the first statement is a declaration (and that comma is not the comma operator). It's not any harder to do:

for (int i, double d; ...)

Than it is:

int i, double d;

Because for (init cond; expr) statement gets expanded to:

{
    init
    while (cond)
    {
        statement
        expr;
    }
}

A trick is to make that init statement a struct definition and instance, like:

for (struct { int myIndex; MyElement* ptr;} data = {0, Pool->First};
    data.ptr;
    ++data.myIndex, data.ptr = data.ptr->next)
    {
        // blah...
    }

Which becomes the same as:

{
    struct
    {
        int myIndex;
        MyElement* ptr;
    } data = {0, Pool->First};

    while (data.ptr)
    {
        {
            // blah...
        }
        ++data.myIndex, data.ptr = data.ptr->next;
    }
}

But I find that pretty ugly. In practice, I'd just split it up like you have. If scope is really a problem, which it probably isn't, throw the extra braces around there.

I don't think there's much to improve here without a bit of boilerplate code.

share|improve this answer
2  
Oh that's an ugly solution, I'm kinda glad I didn't think of it. :-) I too much prefer putting the loop in its own block. – Omnifarious Aug 9 '10 at 12:57
    
Answer accepted. There doesn't seem a more elegant way than defining the variables outside the for-loop and putting the whole block between braces. – Patrick Aug 9 '10 at 13:06
3  
+1 for thinking outside the box! But yes, ugly! :-) – Steve Folly Aug 9 '10 at 13:09
    
@Martin: Note that an init statement ends with ;, so putting it into the equivalence is redundant/erroneous. (See §6.5.3.) – GManNickG Aug 9 '10 at 13:25
1  
@GMan: Sorry. :-) – Loki Astari Aug 9 '10 at 16:10

If I really wanted to confine the scope to the loop I would use:

#include <utility>
for (auto i = std::make_pair(0,Pool->First);
     i.second;
     ++i.first, i.second=i.second->next)
share|improve this answer
    
But now you loose all the information that was given by the variables names: i.first and i.second do not convey any information about the purpose of the variables, whereas myIndex and ptr give some (not a lot, but some). – Luc Touraille Aug 9 '10 at 13:49
2  
Yes, there is a tradeoff to make here - I would say it is the standard tradeoff when using pair. If the purpose of the pair members is evident I would stick to pair. If not I would switch to a solution with explicit names. – Peter G. Aug 9 '10 at 13:53
    
@LucTouraille: you can always define a small struct for this in place of std::pair<>.. – lorro Jun 24 at 13:20

At least C++ allows us to declare variables in the if clause, which which is sometimes used to declare a variable that only is only visible when some condition is true:

if (MyElement *ptr=Pool->First) // block is only entered when ptr!=0
{
 for (int myIndex=0;ptr;++myIndex,ptr=ptr->next)
 {
 }
}
// ptr is out of scope now.

This could be a method to limit the scope of ptr and index, while maintaining readability.

share|improve this answer
    
There is really no need for the if statement. You can add braces (almost) anywhere you like to set up a new scope. – Dennis Zickefoose Aug 9 '10 at 13:21
    
The if() for() ... pattern works also well with macros. – Nordic Mainframe Aug 9 '10 at 13:22

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