Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to do one thing if args is integer and ather thing if args is string.

How can i chack type? Example:

def handle(self, *args, **options):

        if not args:
           do_something()
        elif args is integer:
           do_some_ather_thing:
        elif args is string: 
           do_totally_different_thing()
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

First of, *args is always a list. You want to check if its content are strings?

import types
def handle(self, *args, **options):
    if not args:
       do_something()
    # check if everything in args is a Int
    elif all( isinstance(s, types.IntType) for s in args):
       do_some_ather_thing()
    # as before with strings
    elif all( isinstance(s, types.StringTypes) for s in args):
       do_totally_different_thing()

It uses types.StringTypes because Python actually has two kinds of strings: unicode and bytestrings - this way both work.

In Python3 the builtin types have been removed from the types lib and there is only one string type. This means that the type checks look like isinstance(s, int) and isinstance(s, str).

share|improve this answer
    
your right. It is list. –  Pol Aug 9 '10 at 14:30
    
Is there any preference for using isinstance(s,types.IntType) over just isinstance(s,int) or is it just to be consistent with what you mentioned for the two types of strings? Just curious. –  Brent Nash Aug 9 '10 at 14:35
1  
Your solution is not compatible with python 3.1! –  banx Aug 9 '10 at 14:37
    
@Brent Nash yeah just consistency. Run int is types.IntType in the interpreter. –  Jochen Ritzel Aug 9 '10 at 14:50
2  
Actually testing for basestring (the superclass of str and unicode) instead of types.StringTypes should work as well. –  Philipp Aug 9 '10 at 15:35

You could also try to do it in a more Pythonic way without using type or isinstance(preferred because it supports inheritance):

if not args:
     do_something()
else:
     try:
        do_some_other_thing()
     except TypeError:
        do_totally_different_thing()

It obviously depends on what do_some_other_thing() does.

share|improve this answer
type(variable_name)

Then you need to use:

if type(args) is type(0):
   blabla

Above we are comparing if the type of the variable args is the same as the literal 0 which is an integer, if you wish to know if for instance the type is long, you compare with type(0l), etc.

share|improve this answer
    
I dont understand. How to use it? –  Pol Aug 9 '10 at 14:28
4  
Ugh. type(2) is int, but anyway, type is Not Good Python –  katrielalex Aug 9 '10 at 14:29

If you know that you are expecting an integer/string argument, you shouldn't swallow it into *args. Do

def handle( self, first_arg = None, *args, **kwargs ):
    if isinstance( first_arg, int ):
        thing_one()
    elif isinstance( first_arg, str ):
        thing_two()
share|improve this answer

No one has mentioned it, but the Easier to Ask For Forgiveness principle probably applies since I presume you'll be doing something with that integer:

def handle(self, *args, **kwargs):
    try:
        #Do some integer thing
    except TypeError:
        #Do some string thing

Of course if that integer thing is modifying the values in your list, maybe you should check first. Of course if you want to loop through args and do something for integers and something else for strings:

def handle(self, *args, **kwargs):
    for arg in args:
        try:
            #Do some integer thing
        except TypeError:
            #Do some string thing

Of course this is also assuming that no other operation in the try will throw a TypeError.

share|improve this answer
    
actually i've mentioned it :) –  systempuntoout Aug 9 '10 at 14:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.