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I've been reading a lot on TDD over the past few months and decided to jump in and try it out with an easy example, I'm just not sure I'm testing for the right things in practice. Here the tests for a custom Data Annotation for validating emails:

using System;
using System.Text;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting;

namespace MembershipTest.Tests
{
    [TestClass]
    public class CustomDataAnnotationsTest
    {
        [TestMethod]
        public void CustomDataAnnotations_Email_ReturnTrueIfNull()
        {
            // Arrange
            EmailAttribute attribute = new EmailAttribute();

            // Act
            bool result = attribute.IsValid(null);

            // Assert
            Assert.AreEqual(true, result);
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void CustomDataAnnotations_Email_ReturnFalseIfInvalid()
        {
            // Arrange
            EmailAttribute attribute = new EmailAttribute();

            // Act
            bool result = attribute.IsValid("()[]\\;:,<>@example.com");

            // Assert
            Assert.AreEqual(false, result);
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void CustomDataAnnotations_Email_ReturnTrueIfValid()
        {
            // Arrange
            EmailAttribute attribute = new EmailAttribute();

            // Act
            bool result = attribute.IsValid("john.smith@example.com");

            // Assert
            Assert.AreEqual(true, result);
        }
    }
}

And here is the subsequent code written for the test:

using System;
using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations;
using System.Net.Mail;

public class EmailAttribute : ValidationAttribute
{
    public override bool IsValid(object value)
    {
        //Let RequiredAttribute validate whether the value is required or not.
        if (value == null)
        {
            return true;
        }

        //Check to see if System.Net.Mail can send to the address.
        try
        {
            var i = new MailAddress(value.ToString());
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            return false;
        }

        return true;
    }

}

All tests failed initially and then succeeded after writing the code, but are the tests appropriately written? Too much, or too little? I know this is a very simple example, but I want to make sure I'm on the right track before moving on to more complicated things.

share|improve this question
    
Perhaps totally offtopic but I'm gonna say it anyway: Dump the VS-integrated testing stuff and get NUnit instead. Like MSBuild vs NAnt, VSTS does not begin to offer the breadth of functionality and flexibility you find in NUnit. Other than that, I think you're approaching this correctly. –  kprobst Aug 9 '10 at 17:55
5  
It is indeed totally offtopic :) I think it's a matter of personal preference. I use the Visual Studio testing tools, and they work very well for me, all integrated in VS. –  Cocowalla Aug 9 '10 at 18:01
1  
@Coco: They also integrate nicely into TFS. –  Steven Sudit Aug 9 '10 at 18:32
2  
I know; I didn't mean to imply otherwise :) I've used TestDriven.NET with NUnit before, and I did like it. But you have to pay for commercial use, and I find the out of the box VS stuff just fine for me. But this really is offtopic and I don't want to cloud the original question further - it's been discussed at length here: stackoverflow.com/questions/92869/… –  Cocowalla Aug 9 '10 at 18:39
    
If I were you, I'd ditch the "Arrange", "Act", and "Assert" comments from your code. Just separate each thing by a line break. Also, I'd get even more descriptive with test names. "ReturnTrueIfValid" and "ReturnFalseIfInvalid" are obvious and don't tell what the test actually does. I also disagree with the way you're validating emails, but that's another story for another day. –  zowens Aug 9 '10 at 19:32
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1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I think you are on the right track. At this point I would suggest some refactoring in your tests. Since you are using

EmailAttribute attribute = new EmailAttribute();

in every test. I would suggest creating TestInitialize() and TestCleanup() methods. The TestInitialize would new EmailAttribute and the TestCleanup would null the object out. This is just a matter of preference. Like this

private EmailAttribute _attribute;

[TestInitialize]
public void TestInitialize()
{
  _attribute = new EmailAttribute
}

[TestCleanup]
public void TestCleanup()
{
  _attribute = null;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Great point there, going with SetUp/TearDown is definitely a good practice :) –  wintermute Aug 9 '10 at 17:44
3  
Your point is very valid, but using the Visual Studio unit testing tools, I think those attributes should be TestInitialize and TestCleanup respectively (the ones you have used are for NUnit) :D –  Cocowalla Aug 9 '10 at 17:47
    
Thanks Cocowalla. I have changed the attribute names. –  mpenrow Aug 9 '10 at 17:49
    
Thanks, mpenrow! –  Graham Conzett Aug 10 '10 at 19:52
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