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  1. How can I improve performance of this chunk of code ?
  2. What would be unit test case for the given problem statement ?

Code:

    public class SlowDictionary {
        private final Map<String,String> dict = new HashMap<String,String>();
        public synchronized String translate (String word)
        throws IllegalArgumentException {
            if (!dict.containsKey(word)) {
                throw new IllegalArgumentException(word + " not found.");
            }
            return dict.get(word);
        }

        public synchronized void addToDictionary (String word, String translation) 
            throws IllegalArgumentException {
            if (dict.containsKey(word)) {
                throw new IllegalArgumentException(word + " already exists.");
            }
            dict.put(word,translation);
        }

        public synchronized Set<String> getAllWords () {    
            return dict.keySet();
        }
    }
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8 Answers 8

up vote 6 down vote accepted

First thing you want to do is get rid of all synchronized key words.

The easiest way of doing that is be declaring dict to be a ConcurrentHashMap:

private final ConcurrentMap<String,String> dict = new ConcurrentHashMap<String,String>();

Doing this you can immidiatly remove the synchronized part of translate so it would look like:

 public String translate (String word) throws IllegalArgumentException { ..

The reason for this is the contract in which the CCHM holds regarding up to date reads.

Finally, add to dictionary can look like:

 public void addToDictionary (String word, String translation) throws IllegalArgumentException {
            if (dict.putIfAbsent(word,translation)!=null) {
                throw new IllegalArgumentException(word + " already exists.");
            }
        }

Also remove synchronized from getAllWords as well.

Edit: After thinking about tom's comment. Having a double look up in this 'exception case' probably isnt worth it. If the case didnt throw an exception then it would be appropriate.

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3  
I'm confused about that addToDictionary implementation. You are optimising the path that throws an exception and doubling the cost of the happy path? –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Aug 9 '10 at 20:12
    
What would be the unit test case for the problem statement ? –  Rachel Aug 14 '10 at 15:09
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Dumping all the synchronized keywords and defining dict as a ConcurrentHashMap might be worth trying.

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Should dict be a private final type ? What would be the consequences of having it without final ? –  Rachel Aug 9 '10 at 20:04
1  
It also wouldn't be thread-safe. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Aug 9 '10 at 20:05
    
Is there any major flaw in code ? –  Rachel Aug 9 '10 at 20:08
    
@Tom: I believe John V.'s rewrite of addToDictionary corrects the only multi-threading vulnerability associated with simply dropping in CHM (though I welcome correction and request clarification if I'm wrong). The fact that this code doesn't have any mechanism for deleting entries simplifies things considerably. –  BlairHippo Aug 9 '10 at 20:14
1  
Yes, although translate is inefficient and will break if, say, a remove method is added. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Aug 9 '10 at 21:08
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  1. Constructing and throwing exception is slow, so don't do that.
  2. Make sure you only use a single map operation in each method, rather than doubling the look up.
  3. If significantly used concurrently, use ConcurrentHashMap instead of synchronized.

Note, the getAllWords method is not thread-safe, or at least, the Set it returns is not.

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but if am using synchronized than getAllWords should be thread safe right ? –  Rachel Aug 9 '10 at 20:10
    
if am not constructing and throwing exceptions than how can I deal with situation where I want to throw exceptions ? –  Rachel Aug 9 '10 at 20:11
    
Also can you elaborate on your 2nd point, I am not getting it clearly ? –  Rachel Aug 9 '10 at 20:12
3  
1. Exceptions are mostly used for exceptional conditions, so why should we care about their performance? That's the strangest java practice I've ever seen. –  Nikita Rybak Aug 9 '10 at 20:12
    
@Rachel In performance terms it depends how often you are going to throw an exception. If you want good performance and be throwing exceptions, you are going to have to drop one constraint or the other. As for point 2, you seem to be doing two lookup in to the hash map where one would do (you may need the extended operations in ConcurrentHashMap for this). –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Aug 9 '10 at 20:42
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When you say improve the performance, do you have any idea about the usage statistics? How many writes to reads for instance, and how large the internal map is?

If the number of reads is proportionally high and the map is populated mostly at startup (and isn't enormous), a copy-on-write strategy might be your best bet. We have used (and maintain) a CopyOnWriteMap that has better performance for concurrent reads than ConcurrentHashMap (by about 10% in our tests).

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I forgot to say, the linked CopyOnWriteMap also provides a stable, unmodifiable keySet() view as well which would get around a potential bug in the getAllWords() implementations shown here – if someone tried to remove(String) from it for example, or iterated over it while it was concurrently modified. –  Jed Wesley-Smith Aug 11 '10 at 2:27
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You should be using ConcurrentHashMap however with your current implementation its worth nothing that the getAllWords() has a thread safe copy on the data only inside the synchronized block, i.e. unless the caller also synchronizes the collction, its not thread safe. One way around this is to take a copy before returning (or use ConcurrentHashMap)

In the following example, the map is accessed once per method, rather than twice. (without synchronized)

public class SlowDictionary { 
    private final ConcurrentMap<String,String> dict = new ConcurentHashMap<String,String>(); 

    public String translate (String word) throws IllegalArgumentException { 
        String translation = dict.get(word);
        if (translation == null) 
            throw new IllegalArgumentException(word + " not found."); 
        return translation; 
    } 

    public void addToDictionary (String word, String translation) throws IllegalArgumentException { 
        if (dict.putIfAbsent(word, translation) != null) 
            throw new IllegalArgumentException(word + " already exists."); 
    } 

    public Set<String> getAllWords () {     
        return dict.keySet(); 
    } 
}
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How can I unit test this scenario ? –  Rachel Aug 14 '10 at 15:12
    
That depends on what you want to test for. What situation do you want to test? –  Peter Lawrey Aug 17 '10 at 18:18
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I could be way off here, but that looks about as good as you'll get. That's basically cookie cutter sync-map accessors there.

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Can you explain what do you meant by cookie cutter sync-map accessor there ? –  Rachel Aug 9 '10 at 20:05
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if you have more reads than writes (that's usually the case) consider using ReadWriteLock this way readers are not blocking each other.

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There are a lot of efficient ways to store dictionaries. Using heavyweight things like Java's default HashMap and String objects is not one of them.

So, sure, you can get rid of the synchronized keyword and try gain a tiny bit of speed left and right by working around Java idiosynchrasies.

Sure, a Map's contains is O(1)... But the map resizing when you put millions of String in it ain't O(1) ;)

Food for thought: determining if a word is present using, say, a Trie, will probably be faster than simply computing a String's hashcode (I'm not saying a trie is what you need is: all I'm saying is: there's more than "let's use a HashMap, it's O(1) so you can't beat that"-meets-the-eye.

And I can tell you that, say, Google's 'translate' and Google's 'find-as-you-type' are definitely not implemented by storing millions of Java String object in I-need-constant-resizing-and-I-resize-very-slowly Java HashMaps.

What are your requirements? How many words? How many languages to be supported?

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Java's String.hashCode() (at least in the Sun classes) is incredibly fast. So don't mock about that. –  Roland Illig Aug 21 '10 at 5:21
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