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In java.util.Calendar, January is defined as month 0, not month 1. Is there any specific reason to that ?

I have seen many people getting confused about that...

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Isn't that kind of an implementation detail, since the constants JANUARY, FEBRUARY etc. exists? The date classes predates proper java enum support. –  gnud Dec 5 '08 at 16:42
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Even more annoying - why is there an Undecember? –  matt b Dec 5 '08 at 17:04
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@gnud: No, it's not an implementation detail. It makes it a pain when you've been given an integer in "natural" base (i.e. Jan=1) and you need to use it with the calendar API. –  Jon Skeet Dec 5 '08 at 17:12
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@matt b: it's for non-Gregorian calendars (lunar calendars, etc) that have thirteen months. That's why it's best not to think in terms numbers, but let Calendar do it's localization. –  erickson Dec 5 '08 at 17:37
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The 13-month argument makes no sense. If that's so, why not have the extra month be 0 or 13? –  Quinn Taylor Aug 11 '09 at 3:23

12 Answers 12

up vote 182 down vote accepted

It's just part of the horrendous mess which is the Java date/time API. Listing what's wrong with it would take a very long time (and I'm sure I don't know half of the problems). Admittedly working with dates and times is tricky, but aaargh anyway.

Do yourself a favour and use Joda Time instead, or possibly JSR-310.

EDIT: As for the reasons why - as noted in other answers, it could well be due to old C APIs, or just a general feeling of starting everything from 0... except that days start with 1, of course. I doubt whether anyone outside the original implementation team could really state reasons - but again, I'd urge readers not to worry so much about why bad decisions were taken, as to look at the whole gamut of nastiness in java.util.Calendar and find something better.

One point which is in favour of using 0-based indexes is that it makes things like "arrays of names" easier:

// I "know" there are 12 months
String[] monthNames = new String[12]; // and populate...
String name = monthNames[calendar.get(Calendar.MONTH)];

Of course, this fails as soon as you get a calendar with 13 months... but at least the size specified is the number of months you expect.

This isn't a good reason, but it's a reason...

EDIT: As a comment sort of requests some ideas about what I think is wrong with Date/Calendar:

  • Surprising bases (1900 as the year base in Date, admittedly for deprecated constructors; 0 as the month base in both)
  • Mutability - using immutable types makes it much simpler to work with what are really effectively values
  • An insufficient set of types: it's nice to have Date and Calendar as different things, but the separation of "local" vs "zoned" values is missing, as is date/time vs date vs time
  • An API which leads to ugly code with magic constants, instead of clearly named methods
  • An API which is very hard to reason about - all the business about when things are recomputed etc
  • The use of parameterless constructors to default to "now", which leads to hard-to-test code
  • The Date.toString() implementation which always uses the system local time zone (that's confused many Stack Overflow users before now)
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...and what's up with deprecating all the useful simple Date methods? Now I have to use that horrible Calendar object in complicated ways to do things that used to be simple. –  Brian Knoblauch Dec 5 '08 at 17:22
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@Brian: I feel your pain. Again, Joda Time is simpler :) (The immutability factor makes things so much more pleasant to work with, too.) –  Jon Skeet Dec 5 '08 at 17:26
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Downvoters: reasons? –  Jon Skeet May 13 '09 at 21:52
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You did not answer the question. –  Zeemee Feb 2 '12 at 13:38
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@user443854: I've listed some points in an edit - see if that helps. –  Jon Skeet Feb 9 '12 at 14:23

C based languages copy C to some degree. The tm structure (defined in time.h) has an integer field tm_mon with the (commented) range of 0-11.

C based languages start arrays at index 0. So this was convenient for outputting a string in an array of month names, with tm_mon as the index.

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There has been alot of answers to this, but I will give my view on the subject anyway. The reason behind this odd behavior, as stated previously, comes from the POSIX C time.h where the months where stored in an int with the range 0-11. To explain why, look at it like this; years and days are considered numbers in spoken language, but months have their own names. So because January is the first month it will be stored as offset 0, the first array element. monthname[JANUARY] would be "January". The first month in the year is the first month array element.

The day numbers on the other hand, since they do not have names, storing them in an int as 0-30 would be confusing, add a lot of day+1 instructions for outputting and, of course, be prone to alot of bugs.

That being said, the inconsistency is confusing, especially in javascript (which also has inherited this "feature"), a scripting language where this should be abstracted far away from the langague.

TL;DR: Because months have names and days of the month do not.

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"months have names and days do not." Ever heard of 'Friday'? ;) OK I'm guessing you meant '..days of the month do not' - maybe it would pay to edit your (otherwise good) answer. :-) –  Andrew Thompson Aug 24 '11 at 17:11

Because doing math with months is much easier.

1 month after December is January, but to figure this out normally you would have to take the month number and do math

12 + 1 = 13 // What month is 13?

I know! I can fix this quickly by using a modulus of 12.

(12 + 1) % 12 = 1

This works just fine for 11 months until November...

(11 + 1) % 12 = 0 // What month is 0?

You can make all of this work again by subtracting 1 before you add the month, then do your modulus and finally add 1 back again... aka work around an underlying problem.

((11 - 1 + 1) % 12) + 1 = 12 // Lots of magical numbers!

Now let's think about the problem with months 0 - 11.

(0 + 1) % 12 = 1 // February
(1 + 1) % 12 = 2 // March
(2 + 1) % 12 = 3 // April
(3 + 1) % 12 = 4 // May
(4 + 1) % 12 = 5 // June
(5 + 1) % 12 = 6 // July
(6 + 1) % 12 = 7 // August
(7 + 1) % 12 = 8 // September
(8 + 1) % 12 = 9 // October
(9 + 1) % 12 = 10 // November
(10 + 1) % 12 = 11 // December
(11 + 1) % 12 = 0 // January

All of the months work the same and a work around isn't necessary.

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This is satisfying. At least there is some value to this madness! –  moljac024 Jul 9 at 9:34
    
"Lots of magical numbers" - nah, it's just one that appears twice. –  Pumbaa80 Aug 20 at 22:53

In Java 8, there is a new Date/Time API JSR 310 that is more sane. The spec lead is the same as the primary author of JodaTime and they share many similar concepts and patterns.

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The new Date Time API is now part of Java 8 –  mschenk74 May 25 '13 at 18:16

I'd say laziness. Arrays start at 0 (everyone knows that); the months of the year are an array, which leads me to believe that some engineer at Sun just didn't bother to put this one little nicety into the Java code.

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you may call it efficiency. –  Milhous Dec 5 '08 at 16:31
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No, I wouldn't. It is more important to optimize the efficiency of one's customers than one's programmers. Since this customer is spending time here asking, they failed at that. –  TheSmurf Dec 5 '08 at 16:45
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It's totally unrelated to efficiency — it's not as if months are stored in an array and you'd need 13 to represent 12 months. It's a matter of not making the API as user-friendly as they should have been in the first place. Josh Bloch rags on Date and Calendar in "Effective Java". Very few APIs are perfect, and the date/time APIs in Java have the unfortunate role of being the ones that were goofed. That's life, but let's not pretend it has anything to do with efficiency. –  Quinn Taylor Aug 11 '09 at 3:06

Probably because C's "struct tm" does the same.

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Because programmers are obsessed with 0-based indexes. OK, it's a bit more complicated than that: it makes more sense when you're working with lower-level logic to use 0-based indexing. But by and large, I'll still stick with my first sentence.

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This is another of those idioms/habits that go way back to assembler or machine language where everything is done in terms of offsets, not indexes. Array notation became a short cut for accessing contiguous blocks, starting at offset 0. –  Ken Gentle Dec 5 '08 at 17:56

Personally, I took the strangeness of the Java calendar API as an indication that I needed to divorce myself from the Gregorian-centric mindset and try to program more agnostically in that respect. Specifically, I learned once again to avoid hardcoded constants for things like months.

Which of the following is more likely to be correct?

if (date.getMonth() == 3) out.print("March");

if (date.getMonth() == Calendar.MARCH) out.print("March");

This illustrates one thing that irks me a little about Joda Time - it may encourage programmers to think in terms of hardcoded constants. (Only a little, though. It's not as if Joda is forcing programmers to program badly.)

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But which scheme is more likely to give you a headache when you don't have a constant in your code - you have a value which is the result of a web service call or whatever. –  Jon Skeet Dec 5 '08 at 17:28
    
That web service call should also be using that constant, of course. :-) Same goes for any external caller. Once we've established that multiple standards exist, the need to enforce one becomes evident. (I do hope I understood your comment...) –  Paul Brinkley Dec 5 '08 at 18:59
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Yes, we should enforce the standard that almost everything else in the world uses when expressing months - the 1-based standard. –  Jon Skeet Dec 5 '08 at 19:20
    
The key word here being "almost". Obviously, Jan=1, etc. feels natural in a date system with extremely wide use, but why allow ourselves to make an exception to avoiding hardcoded constants, in even this one case? –  Paul Brinkley Dec 5 '08 at 21:34
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Because it makes life easier. It just does. I have never encountered an off-by-one problem with a 1-based month system. I've seen plenty such bugs with the Java API. Ignoring what everyone else in the world does just makes no sense. –  Jon Skeet Dec 6 '08 at 7:33

For me, nobody explains it better than mindpro.com:

Gotchas

java.util.GregorianCalendar has far fewer bugs and gotchas than the old java.util.Date class but it is still no picnic.

Had there been programmers when Daylight Saving Time was first proposed, they would have vetoed it as insane and intractable. With daylight saving, there is a fundamental ambiguity. In the fall when you set your clocks back one hour at 2 AM there are two different instants in time both called 1:30 AM local time. You can tell them apart only if you record whether you intended daylight saving or standard time with the reading.

Unfortunately, there is no way to tell GregorianCalendar which you intended. You must resort to telling it the local time with the dummy UTC TimeZone to avoid the ambiguity. Programmers usually close their eyes to this problem and just hope nobody does anything during this hour.

Millennium bug. The bugs are still not out of the Calendar classes. Even in JDK (Java Development Kit) 1.3 there is a 2001 bug. Consider the following code:

GregorianCalendar gc = new GregorianCalendar();
gc.setLenient( false );
/* Bug only manifests if lenient set false */
gc.set( 2001, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0 );
int year = gc.get ( Calendar.YEAR );
/* throws exception */

The bug disappears at 7AM on 2001/01/01 for MST.

GregorianCalendar is controlled by a giant of pile of untyped int magic constants. This technique totally destroys any hope of compile-time error checking. For example to get the month you use GregorianCalendar. get(Calendar.MONTH));

GregorianCalendar has the raw GregorianCalendar.get(Calendar.ZONE_OFFSET) and the daylight savings GregorianCalendar. get( Calendar. DST_OFFSET), but no way to get the actual time zone offset being used. You must get these two separately and add them together.

GregorianCalendar.set( year, month, day, hour, minute) does not set the seconds to 0.

DateFormat and GregorianCalendar do not mesh properly. You must specify the Calendar twice, once indirectly as a Date.

If the user has not configured his time zone correctly it will default quietly to either PST or GMT.

In GregorianCalendar, Months are numbered starting at January=0, rather than 1 as everyone else on the planet does. Yet days start at 1 as do days of the week with Sunday=1, Monday=2,… Saturday=7. Yet DateFormat. parse behaves in the traditional way with January=1.

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In addition to DannySmurf's answer of laziness, I'll add that it's to encourage you to use the constants, such as Calendar.JANUARY.

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That's all very well when you're explicitly writing the code for a particular month, but it's a pain when you've got the month in "normal" form from a different source. –  Jon Skeet Dec 5 '08 at 17:11
    
It's also a pain when you're trying to print that month value in some particular way--you're always adding 1 to it. –  Brian Warshaw Feb 11 '11 at 12:39

It isn't exactly defined as zero per se, it's defined as Calendar.January. It is the problem of using ints as constants instead of enums. Calendar.January == 0.

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The values are one and the same. The APIs may as well return 0, it's identical to the constant. Calendar.JANUARY could have been defined as 1 — that's the whole point. An enum would be a nice solution, but true enums weren't added to the language until Java 5, and Date has been around since the beginning. It's unfortunate, but you really can't "fix" such a fundamental API once third-party code uses it. The best that can be done is to provide new API and deprecate the old one to encourage people to move on. Thank you, Java 7... –  Quinn Taylor Aug 11 '09 at 3:20

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