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Here's a php code

if(isset($_GET['id'])) {
    //do something
} else {
    redirect('index.php'); //redirect is a function
}

Now if id is set (ex: index.php?id=12) then the action is performed but if id is not set (ex: index.php?id=) this shows an error, how to overcome this...??

How to determine id is an integer and it's not empty and then perform the specific action....

Edited

Thank you all for your answers but i am still getting that error...

if(isset($_GET['id'])) { // I implemented all these codes but still....
    $user= User::find_by_id($_GET['id']);
   // Database Classes Fetches user info from database
}
else {
    redirect('index.php'); //redirect function
}

If the id is 1 or greater than 1 then the script executes perfectly. ( index.php?id=1 )

But id i set id as noting i get an error i..e index.php?id=

The code should automatically redirect user to the index.php page instead of showing an error.....

ERROR : Database query failed: You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'LIMIT 1' at line 1

share|improve this question
    
What happens when no id var is set in the query string? –  kevtrout Aug 9 '10 at 21:07
    
By integer, do you mean PHP's datatype or do you mean any sequence of digits? –  Gordon Aug 9 '10 at 21:19
    
If you look at the code, it's not the datatype since @_GET allways returns a string. –  ThoKra Aug 9 '10 at 21:23
    
Why the downvote? +1 –  MaxVT Aug 10 '10 at 6:35

8 Answers 8

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You should check both the set-status and the content:

if ( isset( $_GET['id'] ) && !empty( $_GET['id'] ) )
    // ....

Note that you should not use the value simply as it is and work with it. You should make sure that it only contains values you expect. To check for an integer, and even better to work with an integer from that on, do something like that:

$id = ( isset( $_GET['id'] ) && is_numeric( $_GET['id'] ) ) ? intval( $_GET['id'] ) : 0;

if ( $id != 0 )
    // id is an int != 0
else
    redirect('index.php');
share|improve this answer
1  
is_int will never be true, from php.net: Note: To test if a variable is a number or a numeric string (such as form input, which is always a string), you must use is_numeric(). –  ThoKra Aug 9 '10 at 21:00
    
But if i keep url as ( index.php?id= ) it shows an error....., it should redirect to index.php –  Roccos Aug 9 '10 at 21:01
    
@Terw: Oops, that's what happens, when I try to remember some function I don't use often.. Thanks! –  poke Aug 10 '10 at 9:29
    
@Roccos: What error does it show? –  poke Aug 10 '10 at 16:20

What does the error tell you?

But this would check if it's set, and if it's an integer

if(isset($_GET['id']) && ctype_digit($_GET['id']) && intval($_GET['id']) > 0)

is_numeric @ php.net

Or check out ctype_digit

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1  
let's suppose ?id=1.5 –  zerkms Aug 9 '10 at 20:54
1  
is_numeric really doesn't cut it. –  delete me Aug 9 '10 at 20:56
    
Linked to the ctype_digit function wich would just check if there are integers, updated the example to use this –  ThoKra Aug 9 '10 at 20:58
    
But if i keep url as ( index.php?id= ) it shows an error....., it should redirect to index.php –  Roccos Aug 9 '10 at 21:00
    
@MrXexxed: And @_GET is allways a string, right? –  ThoKra Aug 9 '10 at 21:02

It seems like you're just having an issue with the ?id throwing a true when you want to check if its set. Thats because it is set, but not set to a value that you would like to use.

I'm assuming the userids have to be > 0 so just do this

if (isset($_GET['id']) && $_GET['id'] > 0) {
    $user= User::find_by_id($_GET['id']);
} else {
    redirect('index.php'); 
}

Also you're prolly best cleaning the id before processing it so

$userID = isset($_GET['id']) && $_GET['id'] > 0 ? (int) $_GET['id'] : 0;

if ($userID) {
    $user= User::find_by_id($userID);
} else {
    redirect('index.php'); 
}

Theres a lot of ways to do it, personally I prefer this. It makes your code look a bit cleaner.

share|improve this answer
if (!empty($_GET['id']) && filter_var($_GET['id'], FILTER_VALIDATE_INT))

or

if (!empty($_GET['id']) && ctype_digit($_GET['id']))
share|improve this answer
2  
Note that integer 0 and string "0" are considered to be "empty" by PHP. –  Daniel Vandersluis Aug 9 '10 at 20:52
    
@Daniel: yeah, i remembered that while writing answer but I bet that he is referring to some primary key which is definitely positive integer –  zerkms Aug 9 '10 at 20:55
    
it's entirely possible that a primary key might be zero or negative. –  timdev Aug 9 '10 at 21:18
    
@timdev A primary key for a user I doubt is negative or zero. It is possible though... Bad design nevertheless. –  Chad Scira Aug 10 '10 at 5:44
    
@Chad Scira Yes, probably bad design (basically, it suggests that negative PK values are somehow special, which is kind of like the magic number antipattern. –  timdev Aug 10 '10 at 16:41

Well... If you're setting it up as an integer type variable, then you could do also this:

if($_GET['id'] && gettype($_GET['id']) == 'integer'){
    #do something
}else{
    #do something else
}
share|improve this answer
    
This won't work as gettype will always report a string type, because the GET parameters are usually not typed. Also calling $_GET['id'] will raise an index warning when it is not set. –  poke Aug 10 '10 at 16:22

How to determine id is an integer and it's not empty and then perform the specific action....

if (!empty($_GET['id']) && (intval($_GET['id']) == $_GET['id'])) {
    //do something
} else {
    redirect('index.php'); //redirect is a function
}

The above may not be the best solution, but it should work for what you need. It will not allow the id to be 0, and will require it to be an integer.

share|improve this answer
    
Will not work as you see on php.net, the @_GEt never return integers (if you doesn't specify it your self) it returns a string. –  ThoKra Aug 9 '10 at 21:05
    
Thanks for pointing that out. I corrected the code so that it will work for what he needs. –  Joseph Aug 9 '10 at 21:15
    
Sadly it didn't work for what i need...., It's should be simple if id= (space) or id=0 it should automatically redirect user to index.php page without going further.., but it's not working... :( –  Roccos Aug 9 '10 at 21:28
    
Are you doing anything with $_GET['id'] before the if statement? –  Joseph Aug 9 '10 at 21:56
 if(isset($_GET['id']) && ctype_digit($_GET['id']) && is_numeric($_GET['id']) && $_GET['id']>0) {
  $user= User::find_by_id($_GET['id']);
  }
else {
  redirect('index.php'); //redirect function
  }

Try this and this code full pill your requirement.

share|improve this answer

You'll have to check multiple times for every case possible: what if id is not set or empty? what if id is set but it is not a digit? what if 'id' key does not exist at all in GET request?

I had similar situation. I was sending two vars with GET, one digit: 'id' and another one was string which was a name: 'state' ... I solved it by checking all possible conditions.

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