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I have an application that reads/writes from/to message queues on remote application servers. The clients usually run on machines outside of the servers' domains/forests with no trust setup.

In Windows XP this was no problem, but with the introduction of Windows 7 it stopped working.

After some research I found the suggested Registry tweak for the server (the NewRemoteReadServerAllowNoneSecurityClient DWORD in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\MSMQ\Parameters\Security fix) and implemented that, but the software still throws an exception that access was denied to the Message Queuing system.

The message queuing system on our test server is wide open, with full control for both the EVERYONE and ANONYMOUS LOGIN accounts.

What am I missing?

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I should also add that the software works perfectly on a Windows 7 machine with a user signed in in the same domain/forest as the server. But if I sign out and sign in on a different domain or just to the local machine, access to the MSMQ system is denied. –  Matt R. Aug 9 '10 at 21:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I've been dealing with Microsoft support for a little over a week and they have confirmed that this is a bug in Windows 7 and in Windows Server 2008. I'll come back and add more details about when they expect a fix or workaround when I have that information, but for the time-being it appears that this is simply a bug and unworkable.

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Well, that sucks. Who are you working with at MS? –  John Breakwell Aug 23 '10 at 10:16
    
The support engineer was Imelda, who informed me that the patch for this will likely be part of Windows 2008 SP3. –  Matt R. Aug 25 '10 at 18:03
    
Any news on that bug? –  Egor Pavlikhin Mar 31 '11 at 1:05
    
Not at present. We've actually given up on any systemic solution from the OS side and are basically writing away the MSMQ code for any cross-domain communication and moving to a Net.Sockets implementation instead. –  Matt R. Apr 12 '11 at 15:24

Try these blog posts:

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/johnbreakwell/archive/2010/03/24/understanding-how-msmq-security-blocks-rpc-traffic.aspx

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/johnbreakwell/archive/2008/06/27/cross-forest-msmq-you-need-to-be-trusting.aspx

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/johnbreakwell/archive/2008/04/29/clear-the-way-msmq-coming-through.aspx

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/johnbreakwell/archive/2008/02/14/how-do-i-send-msmq-messages-between-domains.aspx

Cheers

John Breakwell

Plumbersmate.EU

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Hi John, Actually I already read through all of those. The only solution I haven't tried is establishing a bidirectional trust relationship between domains, and that's because that's not an option in our environment (or so I'm being told by the people in charge of that aspect of the environment). Thus far I've added the necessary DWORD key/values in the registry, rebooted the server, given as open permissions as I can on the MSMQ system, and still no dice. –  Matt R. Aug 10 '10 at 14:37

Could you clarify if you are having problems sending or receiving? Sending and receiving use different network protocols and problems are resolved with completely different approaches. As you mention that the application throws an exception then I will assume you get Access Denied on Remote Read operations only.

It sounds like the NewRemoteReadServerAllowNoneSecurityClient problem. You wrote "Thus far I've added the necessary DWORD key/values in the registry, rebooted the server," - which machine(s) did you change the setting on?

Cheers

John Breakwell

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It's an exception on the remote read. The registry change has been made to the server on which the queue exists. Win7 --READ--> Q on Win2K3 with Registry Modification –  Matt R. Aug 10 '10 at 22:28

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