Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We have million and millions of records in a SQL table, and we run really complex analytics on that data to generate reports.

As the table is growing and additional records are being added, the computation time is increasing and the user has to wait a long time before the webpage loads.

We were thinking of using a distributed cache like AppFabric to load the data in memory when the application loads and then running our reports off that data in memory. This should improve the response time a little since now data is in memory vs disk.

Before we take the plundge and implement this I wanted to check and find out what others are doing and what are some of the best techniques and practices to load data in memory, caching etc. Surely you don't just load the entire table with 100s of millions of records in memory...??

I was also looking into OLAP / Data warehousing, which might give us better performance rather than caching.

share|improve this question
    
indexes?........ –  Mitch Wheat Aug 10 '10 at 1:06
    
an index only approach does not solve our problem, we already have indexes defined and fine tuned for our queries. –  ace Aug 15 '10 at 4:00
add comment

3 Answers

The solution to complex reporting is to pre-calculate, so you're on the right path if you're looking at OLAP.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Have you considered partitioning your database? We do this for our largest databases.

Having said that, using app fabric cache correctly will greatly increase performance for most applications that are IO heavy.

share|improve this answer
add comment

We have million and millions of records in a SQL table,

Bad policy. Flat files are better.

and we run really complex analytics on that data to generate reports.

In some cases, you'd be happier loaded relevant subsets into SQL.

As the table is growing and additional records are being added, the computation time is increasing

That's the consequence of using a database for too much. Use it for less.

We were thinking of using a distributed cache like AppFabric...

Perhaps. Flat files, however, are fast and more scalable than RDBMS.

was also looking into OLAP / Data warehousing

Good plan. Buy Kimball's book immediately. You don't need more technology. You only need to make better use of flat files as primary and SQL as a place for ad-hoc queries (against subsets) for users.

share|improve this answer
3  
I feel that "Bad policy. Flat files are better." is a bit of a sweeping statement. Could you elborate? It's quite common to see 100 millions of rows in a RDBMS table, and have it perform well: indexes, partitioning, indexed views spring to mind... –  Mitch Wheat Aug 10 '10 at 1:21
1  
@Mitch Wheat. Flat files are simpler (and therefore faster) than any RDBMS. If the data is simply accumulated and then analyzed, that's what flat files are best for. Please buy Kimball's book. DW is done most simply with flat files for bulk and SQL for ad-hoc queries. –  S.Lott Aug 10 '10 at 1:36
    
@S.Lott: I already have Kimball's book. Several in fact... –  Mitch Wheat Aug 10 '10 at 1:51
    
@S.Lott: Could you tell me where Kimball makes the statement that flat files are always faster. Thx. –  Mitch Wheat Aug 10 '10 at 1:52
3  
Flat files are definitely not better when you're slicing and dicing. e.g. When your query needs to aggregate only a subset of the rows. As the number of different slices required increases, the attractiveness of flat files decreases. Also, they lack good tools to ensure data consistency, availability etc. –  shmichael Aug 12 '10 at 8:26
show 6 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.