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In vim, how can I map "save" (:w) to ctrl-s.

I am trying "map" the command, but xterm freezes when I press ctrl-s.

If I give ctrl-v,ctrl-s still I see only a ^, not ^S.

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6  
what's wrong with Vim's usual :w ? I'm guessing ctrl-s freezes your xterm because it freezes all output in terminals. ('stty -ixon' might help) –  Yoni H Aug 10 '10 at 6:14
7  
Pressing (Escape shift colon w Enter) takes about 3 times longer than pressing Ctrl-s. Although I have found pressing ctrl-s causes carpal tunnel more than Esc shift colon w enter, it spreads out the strain to have two options to save. –  Eric Leschinski Jul 2 '12 at 17:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 39 down vote accepted

Ctrl-S is a common command to terminals to stop updating, it was a way to slow the output so you could read it on terminals that didn't have a scrollback buffer. First find out if you can configure your xterm to pass Ctrl-S through to the application. Then these map commands will work:

noremap <silent> <C-S>          :update<CR>
vnoremap <silent> <C-S>         <C-C>:update<CR>
inoremap <silent> <C-S>         <C-O>:update<CR>

BTW: if Ctrl-S freezes your terminal, type Ctrl-Q to get it going again.

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works with OSX, iTerm2, ZSH, oh-my-zsh when you include "stty -ixon" in the .zshrc file –  Richard Aug 12 '13 at 18:16
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"stty -ixon" in your .bashrc is also required for Terminal.app with bash. –  Jonathan Potter May 5 '14 at 17:23

In linux with VI, you want to press Ctrl-S and have it save your document. This worked for me, put the following three lines in your .vimrc file. This file should be located in your home directory: /home/el/.vimrc If this file doesn't exist you can create it.

:nmap <c-s> :w<CR>
:imap <c-s> <Esc>:w<CR>a

The first line says: pressing Ctrl-S within a document will perform a :w <enter> keyboard combination.

The second line says: pressing Ctrl-S within a document while in 'insert' mode will escape to normal mode, perform a :w <enter, then press a to get back into insert mode. Your cursor may move during this event.

You may notice that pressing Ctrl-S performs an 'XOFF' which stops commands from being received (If you are using ssh).

To fix that, place these two commands in your ~/.bash_profile

bind -r '\C-s'
stty -ixon

What that does is turn off the binding of Ctrl-S and gets rid of any XOFF onscreen messages when pressing Ctrl-S. Note, after you make changes to your .bash_profile you have to re-run it with the command 'source .bash_profile' or logout/login.

More Info: http://vim.wikia.com/wiki/Map_Ctrl-S_to_save_current_or_new_files

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For gnome terminal doing adding 'stty -ixon' to my .bashrc was enough. –  DavidG Jul 29 '13 at 15:17
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:imap <c-s> <Esc>:w<CR>a <----- This won't work as expected when at the beginning of the line ('a' will append instead of insert, which is what I'd expect). Is there are way to make it do 'a' or 'i' according to where the cursor is? –  alexandernst Apr 11 '14 at 9:07
    
Could you please explain why you use 2 imap commands? It seems like you only need imap <c-s> <Esc>:w<CR>a. Thanks. –  gwintrob Jan 21 at 22:37
    
I thought the 2nd imap command line had significance, but on further inspection it does nothing. Excellent catch, I removed the lame line. –  Eric Leschinski Jan 22 at 0:59

Mac OSX Terminal + zsh?

In your .zprofile

alias vim="stty stop '' -ixoff; vim"

Why?, What's happening? See Here, but basically for most terminals ctrl+s is already used for something, so this alias vim so that before we run vim we turn off that mapping.

In your .vimrc

nmap <c-s> :w<cr>
imap <c-s> <esc>:w<cr>a

Why? What's happening? This one should be pretty obvious, we're just mapping ctrl+s to different keystrokes depending on if we are in normal mode or insert mode.

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