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This is a two part question - first I need to get every element that is a child (or subchild, etc) of a parent element, and then I need to reset it's style. As such, I'm looking to do something like the following:

var everything = parent.getEveryElementBelowThisOne();
for (i=0; i<everything.length; i++)
    everything[i].css = "font: 100%/100% Verdana,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif; color: rgb(0, 0, o); margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-collapse: collapse; border-width: 0px; border-spacing: 0px; text-align: left; outline: 0pt none; text-transform: none; vertical-align: middle; background-color: transparent; table-layout: auto; min-width: 0px; min-height: 0px;"

So my questions are as follows:

  • Is there a javascript function that will effectively walk through the DOM below a given element?
  • Is there a javascript function that will let me set a CSS string like that? Or do I have to have a whole bunch of entries like:
everything[i].style.font = ...;
everything[i].style.color = ...;
[...]
everything[i].style.min-height: ...;

jQuery is not an option.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Instead of a string, I would use an object, much more readable and maintainable:

var new_css = {
    font: '100%/100% Verdana,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif',
    color: 'rgb(0, 0, o)',
    margin: '0px',
    padding: '0px',
    borderCollapse: 'collapse'
    /* rest here ... */
}

Then use a helper function, something like:

function setStyle (element, style) {
    for (var n in style) {
        element[n] = style[n];
    }
}

and into your for loop:

for (i=0; i<everything.length; i++) setStyle(everything[i],new_css);

A note about the setStyle function (before people downvote me for this like last time), I purposely did not use a hasOwnProperty to check the elements of style because in this case, and in most cases we are using an object not inherited from anything. If you construct your new_css object any other way or if you use a library (prototype, I'm looking at you) that modify Object's prototype which may cause problems then feel free to add the hasOwnProperty check. Anyway, setting nonexistent style values are mostly harmless. And without a hasOwnProperty check you can use inheritence to compose style objects.

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Thank you, that is an excellent suggestion for my second question. Now do you know of a way to traverse a dom tree hitting every node? –  Mala Aug 10 '10 at 6:56
    
Each DOM node, including document itself has an array-like collection of children called childNodes. Just recursively traverse through them. For examples, see: stackoverflow.com/questions/1972515/… and stackoverflow.com/questions/3389085/… –  slebetman Aug 10 '10 at 7:26
    
thank you very much. –  Mala Aug 10 '10 at 8:27

Use myElement.style.cssText:

var everything = parent.getEveryElementBelowThisOne();
for (i=0; i<everything.length; i++)
    everything[i].style.cssText = "font: 100%/100% Verdana,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif; color: rgb(0, 0, o); margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-collapse: collapse; border-width: 0px; border-spacing: 0px; text-align: left; outline: 0pt none; text-transform: none; vertical-align: middle; background-color: transparent; table-layout: auto; min-width: 0px; min-height: 0px;"

But note that this will override any inline style attributes already applied. To append extra inline css you should use:

myElement.style.cssText += '; color:red; ...'; // note the initial ";"
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Its slightly offbeat, as when you talk of parent, we assume you would be considering its children at some point. But when you say, every element below this one then they may be DOM elements after the concerned element. Yours may be either of the case.

I assume you want to change style of next element siblings. Using raw javascript, you can traverse in a generic looping way, as

nS = parent.nextElementSibling
while(nS){
  nS.style.width = '100%';
  // Change the desired style here
  // You can also further loop on nS's children using `nS.childNodes`,
  // if you want to change their styles too
  nS = nS.nextElementSibling;
}

As you can see with raw javascript, the way to change styles is quite repelling. On the other hand, jQuery gives good DOM feature.. including easy traversing, even styling.

Like, the same thing in jQuery would be.

$(parent).nextAll().each(function(){
      $(this).css({'width': '100%', 'other': 'rules', 'as': 'one-dict'});
      // Change the desired style here
      // You can also further loop nS's children using `$(this).children()`, 
      // if you want to change their styles too
});

Hope this helps.

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