Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I decided to try out LINQ for the first time to try and solve this question.

The results of my first foray into the wonderful world of LINQ looked like this:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace ConsoleApplication2
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            List<string> list = new List<string>() 
            { 
               "fred-064528-NEEDED1", 
               "xxxx", 
               "frederic-84728957-NEEDED2", 
               "sam-028-NEEDED3", 
               "-----", 
               "another-test" 
            };

            var result =
            from s in list
            where (from c in s where c == '-' select c).Count() == 2
            select s.Substring(s.LastIndexOf("-") + 1);

            foreach (string s in result)
                Console.WriteLine(s);
            Console.WriteLine("Press Enter");
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

I'd like to know how I can improve the above solution to this contrived little example. I'm not too interested in whether I've used the best validation method, or how I could localise "Press Enter" or anything like that; I'm just interested in using this example to learn a little more about LINQ.

share|improve this question
2  
+1 for title :} –  Serkan Hekimoglu Aug 10 '10 at 11:30
    
@serkan - fact. someone needs to bring out a book with that title –  Matt Aug 10 '10 at 12:01
    
it's a clichéd comedy phrase gone funny again –  Matt Jacobsen Aug 10 '10 at 12:09
    
Oops, could not submit my editing changes due to forbidden word 'question' in original title, so I was forced to change the previous title –  Gennady Vanin Геннадий Ванин Feb 15 '13 at 6:45

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted
var result =
        from s in list
        where s.Count(x => x == '=') == 2
        select s.Substring(s.LastIndexOf("-") + 1);
share|improve this answer
1  
where s.Count(x => x == '-') == 2 But totally. –  Toby Aug 10 '10 at 11:17
    
ahh that would be a lambda expression, then –  Matt Jacobsen Aug 10 '10 at 11:18
    
in fact, whole linq is converted to lambda while compiled. Try to look it out in reflector. –  Yossarian Aug 10 '10 at 11:23
1  
The above is a Query Expression not a Lambda Expression. –  heads5150 Aug 10 '10 at 11:26
    
@heads5150: Sorry, I just meant the x => bit. I've heard of Lambda expressions, but like LINQ have never used them. –  Matt Jacobsen Aug 10 '10 at 11:31

It can also be written using Lambda expressions:

var result =
            list.Where(s => (from c in s where c == '-' select c).Count() == 2).Select(
                s => s.Substring(s.LastIndexOf("-") + 1));

I prefer Lambda expressions over LINQ syntax because of the Fluent interface. IMHO it is more human readable.

share|improve this answer
    
Fluent interface? –  Matt Jacobsen Aug 10 '10 at 11:19
    
ahh: stackoverflow.com/questions/214500/… –  Matt Jacobsen Aug 10 '10 at 11:20
    
Generally a fluent interface is implemented by using method chaining to relay the instruction context of a subsequent call. (A bit more involved than that but it'll do for now) In this case the method Where is called then the method Select is called. –  heads5150 Aug 10 '10 at 11:23

I don't think this is an improvement, as it is less readable, but you can do it all in one-line using some of the inbuilt methods in the List class:

list.FindAll(s => s.ToCharArray().
    Where(c => c == '-').Count() ==2).
    ForEach(c => Console.WriteLine(c.Substring(c.LastIndexOf("-") + 1)));

Personally I find this rather horrible, so it's just for interest!

share|improve this answer
    
But it's fun! Mine's pretty similar, good use of FindAll too –  fletcher Aug 10 '10 at 11:37
    
just for readability I'd have put "list.FindAll(s => s.ToCharArray(). Where(c => c == '-').Count() ==2)" all on one line, but thanks, your solution got me thinking about lambdas and delegates. Think I understand them a little better now. –  Matt Jacobsen Aug 10 '10 at 11:43

This is pretty nice I think. Partly LINQ.

var result = String.Join("-", inputData.Split('-').Skip(2));

If there can't be any '-' after the first two then this will do (not LINQ):

var result = inputData.Split('-')[2];  //If the last part is NEE-DED then only NEE is returned. And will fail on wrong input
share|improve this answer
    
nice, but consumes more memory, than .Substring variant. –  Yossarian Aug 10 '10 at 11:28
1  
I did var result = from s in list select String.Join("", s.Split('-').Skip(2)); Great idea, but it's snagging on the red herring entries (e.g. "xxxx") –  Matt Jacobsen Aug 10 '10 at 11:30
    
@Yossarian Yes you are properly right about that. But it must be faster than Reg exp and I think it is pretty sleek syntacticly. If you want the fastest possible you should properly not use LINQ but a more imperative way. –  Lasse Espeholt Aug 10 '10 at 11:31
    
@Matt Jacobsen, thanks for translating this answer –  Gennady Vanin Геннадий Ванин Feb 15 '13 at 7:09

I'm a big fan of Lambdas too...

    static void Main(string[] args)  
    {  
        Func<string, char, int> countNumberOfCharsInString = 
             (str, c) => str.Count(character => character == c);

        var list = new List<string>() 
        { "fred-064528-NEEDED1", 
           "xxxx", 
           "frederic-84728957-NEEDED2", 
           "sam-028-NEEDED3", 
           "-----", "another-test" 
        };

        list.Where(fullString => countNumberOfCharsInString(fullString,'-') == 2)
            .ToList()
            .ForEach(s => Console.WriteLine(s.Substring(s.LastIndexOf("-")+1)));

        Console.WriteLine("Press Enter");   
        Console.ReadLine();  
    } 
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.