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I have a canvas in my webpage; I create a new Image data in this canvas then I modify some pixel through myImgData.data[] array. Now I would like to scale this image and make it bigger. I tried by scaling the context but the image remains small. Is it possible to do this? Thanks

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4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You could draw the imageData to a new canvas, scale the original canvas and then draw the new canvas to the original canvas.

Something like this should work:

var imageData = context.getImageData(0, 0, 100, 100);
var newCanvas = $("<canvas>")
    .attr("width", imageData.width)
    .attr("height", imageData.height)[0];

newCanvas.getContext("2d").putImageData(imageData, 0, 0);

context.scale(1.5, 1.5);
context.drawImage(newCanvas, 0, 0);

Here's a functioning demo http://jsfiddle.net/Hm2xq/2/.

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1  
This works perfectly. –  mikechambers Jan 26 '11 at 7:17
1  
I would just like to add that you could do this without creating another canvas as ctx.drawImage(ctx.canvas,0,0); draws the canvas onto itself, and you can scale as you draw this. –  Overcode May 12 '13 at 19:01

I needed to do it without the interpolation that putImageData() causes, so I did it by scaling the image data into a new, resized ImageData object. I can't think of any other time I've thought that using 5 nested for loops was a good idea:

function scaleImageData(imageData, scale) {
  var scaled = c.createImageData(imageData.width * scale, imageData.height * scale);

  for(var row = 0; row < imageData.height; row++) {
    for(var col = 0; col < imageData.width; col++) {
      var sourcePixel = [
        imageData.data[(row * imageData.width + col) * 4 + 0],
        imageData.data[(row * imageData.width + col) * 4 + 1],
        imageData.data[(row * imageData.width + col) * 4 + 2],
        imageData.data[(row * imageData.width + col) * 4 + 3]
      ];
      for(var y = 0; y < scale; y++) {
        var destRow = row * scale + y;
        for(var x = 0; x < scale; x++) {
          var destCol = col * scale + x;
          for(var i = 0; i < 4; i++) {
            scaled.data[(destRow * scaled.width + destCol) * 4 + i] =
              sourcePixel[i];
          }
        }
      }
    }
  }

  return scaled;
}

I hope that at least one other programmer can copy and paste this into their editor while muttering, "There but for the grace of god go I."

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Also it's possible to use more quality interpolation methods, such as bilinear or spline. –  KvanTTT Jan 11 '13 at 8:29
1  
@KvanTTT totally true, although sometimes you want those chunky pixels. –  rodarmor Sep 6 '13 at 12:08

You can scale the canvas using the drawImage method.

context = canvas.getContext('2d');
context.drawImage( canvas, 0, 0, 2*canvas.width, 2*canvas.height );

This would scale the image to double the size and render the north-west part of it to the canvas. Scaling is achieved with the third and fourth parameters to the drawImage method, which specify the resulting width and height of the image.

See docs at MDN https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/DOM/CanvasRenderingContext2D#drawImage%28%29

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I know it's an old subject, but since people like may find it useful, I add my optimization to the code of rodarmor :

function scaleImageData(imageData, scale) {
    var scaled = ctx.createImageData(imageData.width * scale, imageData.height * scale);
    var subLine = ctx.createImageData(scale, 1).data
    for (var row = 0; row < imageData.height; row++) {
        for (var col = 0; col < imageData.width; col++) {
            var sourcePixel = imageData.data.subarray(
                (row * imageData.width + col) * 4,
                (row * imageData.width + col) * 4 + 4
            );
            for (var x = 0; x < scale; x++) subLine.set(sourcePixel, x*4)
            for (var y = 0; y < scale; y++) {
                var destRow = row * scale + y;
                var destCol = col * scale;
                scaled.data.set(subLine, (destRow * scaled.width + destCol) * 4)
            }
        }
    }

    return scaled;
}

This code uses less loops and runs roughly 30 times faster. For instance, on a 100x zoom of a 100*100 area this codes takes 250 ms while the other takes more than 8 seconds.

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