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Good news: A major release is in the bag!

Bad news: I just found out (2 weeks too late) that some people don't have MSXML 6 on their machines and the new installer we're rolling out requires it.

Good news: We can distribute an MSI file to install MSXML

Bad news: There are three MSI files to choose from, one 'normal' one, one ending in ia64 and one ending in x64.

I have at my disposal, Delphi 7, C++ and um... Batch files... How do I make one of those handy Setup.exe's that choose the right MSI to launch automatically.

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What kind of installer are you writing? I'm pretty sure InnoSetup it's better than batch files. –  Leonardo Herrera Aug 10 '10 at 15:40
    
Yeah, I wasn't going to use batch files but not planning making the bossman spend any C A double SH, for this, since it's my fault for being soooo bleeding edge to begin with (and no one else here uses any COM stuff). –  Peter Turner Aug 10 '10 at 18:39
4  
Well, InnoSetup is F R double E. You should take a look at it. –  Leonardo Herrera Aug 10 '10 at 19:43
    
Cool, I see it is as you say. Although I got this code to work pretty swell. Just prejudice on my part I suppose, but something about the name InnoSetup reminded me of TMSSmoothControls or TeeTreeView and made me want to whip out a credit card. –  Peter Turner Aug 11 '10 at 12:18
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Short answer: Use the GetSystemInfo function of the Windows API to find out if the system is 32-bit or 64-bit.

Example code:

program Project1;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses
  SysUtils, Windows;

var
  si: TSystemInfo;

const
  PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE_AMD64 = 9;
  PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE_IA64 = 6;
  PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE_INTEL = 0;
  PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE_UNKNOWN = $FFFF;

begin

  GetSystemInfo(si);
  case si.wProcessorArchitecture of
    PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE_AMD64: Writeln('AMD64');
    PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE_IA64: Writeln('IA64');
    PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE_INTEL: Writeln('Intel');
    PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE_UNKNOWN: Writeln('Unknown');
  end;

  Readln;

end.

The two most common outputs are 'Intel' (32-bit x86) and 'AMD64' (64-bit x64). In fact, you can more or less trust that you will get one of those.

Now, in reality, I believe that the above program will always return 'Intel' (32-bit x86) because all Delphi applications are 32-bit, and so they are emulated under a 64-bit Windows (using WOW64) -- there is no 64-bit release of the Delphi compiler and IDE.

So to obtain the true architecture of the system, regardless of emulation, you have to use the GetNativeSystemInfo function. There is no wrapper for this function, so you have to import it yourself from kernel32.dll.

program Project1;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses
  SysUtils, Windows;

var
  si: TSystemInfo;

const
  PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE_AMD64 = 9;
  PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE_IA64 = 6;
  PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE_INTEL = 0;
  PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE_UNKNOWN = $FFFF;

procedure GetNativeSystemInfo(var lpSystemInfo: TSystemInfo); stdcall; external kernel32 name 'GetNativeSystemInfo';

begin

  GetNativeSystemInfo(si);
  case si.wProcessorArchitecture of
    PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE_AMD64: Writeln('AMD64');
    PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE_IA64: Writeln('IA64');
    PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE_INTEL: Writeln('Intel');
    PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE_UNKNOWN: Writeln('Unknown');
  end;

  Readln;

end.
share|improve this answer
    
By the way: in the last example it looks kind of the block begin ... end is the implementation of GetNativeSystemInfo. This is not the case. The block is the console program. In a more regular unit, you would write procedure GetNativeSystemInfo(var lpSystemInfo: TSystemInfo); stdcall; in the interface section and procedure GetNativeSystemInfo; external kernel32 name 'GetNativeSystemInfo'; in the implementation section. Then, from any unit using this unit, you can call GetNativeSystemInfo, the same way you call GetSystemInfo. –  Andreas Rejbrand Aug 10 '10 at 13:55
    
Thanks a metric ton, I'll mark this as the answer as soon as I run your code. –  Peter Turner Aug 10 '10 at 14:12
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You can forget the IA64 which is for Itanium systems. I'd use a tool to create a setup (there are excellent free ones, like InnoSetup). They will detect which kind of system the setup up is running upon, and let you run the proper installer of msxml. If the tool supports the Windows Installer engine directly it can take advantage of merge modules (msm) to distribute needed runtimes, otherwise is pretty easy to run a msi from the installer. You could also write your own installer, but you get another app to write, test and mantain. I'd take advantage of existing ones for such a task.

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Point well taken, good to know what IA64 is because if I were to forgot you can bet that 7 of our clients would need it! –  Peter Turner Aug 10 '10 at 15:23
    
Also, gotta mention that GetNativeSystemInfo isn't in Win2k, but if they've got win2k then they hopefully haven't got a 64 bit processor so what the hey. I found this handy as well msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms724429%28VS.85%29.aspx –  Peter Turner Aug 10 '10 at 19:38
    
Although, I should have mentioned it as a comment to the other guy's post... –  Peter Turner Aug 10 '10 at 19:41
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