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I have a method right now that loops through a list of business objects (property Properties) to test if property SerialNumber is a serial number or not. If I find a serial number, I exit the loop and return true, otherwise I return false.

Code is as follows:

  public bool HasSerialNumber()
  {
      if (this.Properties != null && this.Properties.Count > 0)
      {
          foreach (var property in Properties)
          {
              if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(property.SerialNumber))
                  return true;
          }
      }
      return false;
  }

Is there a better LINQ approach to this?

I have the following in mind:

return Properties.Where(x => !string.IsNullOrEmpty(x.SerialNumber)).ToList().Count > 0;

Is there a better/faster method for checking for non-empty string?

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Even with your example, you can use .Count() instead of .ToList().Count to speed things up a bit. Any() is the way to go though. –  Callum Rogers Aug 10 '10 at 13:30
    
@callum It gave me a compiler error when I had just .Count() so I had to call ToList(). Unless I was calling it wrong... –  mint Aug 10 '10 at 13:32
    
@snow: Strange, it should work. At least this does: var strs = new[] {"", "lol", null}; Console.WriteLine(strs.Where(s=> string.IsNullOrEmpty(s)).Count()); –  Callum Rogers Aug 10 '10 at 13:35
    
@Callum Try returning a bool where Count > 0 –  mint Aug 10 '10 at 13:36
    
@snow: Still works. –  Callum Rogers Aug 10 '10 at 13:47
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4 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You can use Any instead of checking if the count is greater than zero.

return Properties.Any(x => !string.IsNullOrEmpty(x.SerialNumber))

and of course your Properties.Count > 0 check is redundant.

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4  
+1. Apart from better communicating your intent, the added bonus of using Any() is that the underlying list will only be iterated until a property with serial number is found. If you use Count() or ToList(), the complete list must be evaluated, so you lose some performance. Of course, it will not make a big difference in this case, but still. –  jeroenh Aug 11 '10 at 12:39
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Check out IEnumerable<T>.Any():

public bool HasSerialNumber()
{
    if(this.Properties != null)
        return Properties.Any(p => !string.IsNullOrEmpty(p.SerialNumer));
    return false;
}
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I don't think you'll improve particularly on the performance of string.IsNullOrEmpty(), but one pitfall you should be avoiding is the last 2 calls on your query - specifically ToList() and Count().

What you are doing there is iterating through every element, converting it to a list (creating a list and adding items in the process, and then iterating through every element on the list to count how many there are - all to check if a single value is empty.

You can use the Any method to find if a single element matches certain criteria, like so:

return Properties.Any(x => !string.IsNullOrEmpty(x.SerialNumber));
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This should do the trick:

return Properties.Any(x => !string.IsNullOrEmpty(x.SerialNumber));
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