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How can I sort two arrays of coordinates in numerical order by the start coordinates e.g.

my @starts = (100,100,200,300,400,500,525);
my @ends   = (150,125,250,350,450,550,550);

but choose the biggest difference if there are two matching in either the starts or ends list? E.g.

my @uniq_starts = (100,200,300,400,500);
my @unique_ends = (150,250,350,450,550);

Any help greatly appreciated!

Also, how about if the lists are like this?

my @starts = (100,125,200,300,400,500,525);
my @ends   = (150,175,250,350,450,550,550);

This would give me the following for the in between values:

-25, 25, 50, 50, 50, -25

I would need the following output:

my @uniq_starts = (100,200,300,400,500);
my @unique_ends = (175,250,350,450,550);

So my in between values are:

25, 50, 50, 50

I can get around this by just removing and ignoring any negative values, as I can imagine this would make things much more complicated.

share|improve this question
3  
Please post your coded attempt thus far. –  Zaid Aug 10 '10 at 14:35
2  
Shouldn't the first item of @unique_ends be 150 rather than 125, or am I misunderstanding what you mean by "biggest difference"? –  FMc Aug 10 '10 at 14:38
    
Sorry, yes, should be 150, I've edited the text! –  gawbul Aug 10 '10 at 15:03
    
Actually, to make it more complicated... the values may not necessarily match and there could be some overlap still. For example start = (100,125); ends = (150,200). Then I would require starts = (100); ends = (200) :S –  gawbul Aug 10 '10 at 15:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Using Set::IntSpan:

use Set::IntSpan;

my @starts = (100,100,200,300,400,500,525);
my @ends   = (150,125,250,350,450,550,550);

my (@uniq_starts, @unique_ends);

for my $s (Set::IntSpan->new([map [$starts[$_], $ends[$_]], 0 .. $#starts])->spans) {
  push @uniq_starts, $s->[0];
  push @uniq_ends, $s->[1];
}

print join(",", @uniq_starts), "\n";
print join(",", @uniq_ends), "\n";

Or poor man's solution:

sub spans {
  my @s = sort {$a->[0] <=> $b->[0] or $a->[1] <=> $b->[1]} @_;
  my @res;
  while (@s > 1) {
    if ($s[0][1] >= $s[1][0]) {
      splice @s, 0, 2, [$s[0][0], $s[1][1]];
    } else {
      push @res, shift @s;
    }
  }
  push @res, @s;
  return @res;
}

my @starts = (100,100,200,300,400,500,525);
my @ends   = (150,125,250,350,450,550,550);

my (@uniq_starts, @unique_ends);

for my $s (spans(map [$starts[$_], $ends[$_]], 0 .. $#starts)) {
  push @uniq_starts, $s->[0];
  push @uniq_ends, $s->[1];
}

print join(",", @uniq_starts), "\n";
print join(",", @uniq_ends), "\n";

You can check that it works flawless.

More functional spans version:

sub spans {
  return spans_(sort {$a->[0] <=> $b->[0] or $a->[1] <=> $b->[1]} @_);
}

sub spans_ {
  if (@_ > 1 and $_[0][1] >= $_[1][0]) {
    splice @_, 0, 2, [$_[0][0], $_[1][1]];
    goto &spans_;
  } elsif (@_) {
    return shift, spans_(@_);
  } else {
    return;
  }
}

P.S.: If somebody thinks that perl is concise language, compare same algorithm spans function in erlang. I don't even know how it would look in APL or J:

spans(L) -> spans_(lists:sort(L)).

spans_([{A, B}, {C, D}|T]) when B >= C ->
  spans_([{A, D}|T]);
spans_([H|T]) -> [H|spans_(T)];
spans_([]) -> [].
share|improve this answer

How about using Set::IntSpan?

use Set::IntSpan;

my @starts = (100,100,200,300,400,500,525);
my @ends = (150,125,250,350,450,550,550);
my @spec = map { "$starts[$_]-$ends[$_]" } 0..$#starts;
my $p = Set::IntSpan->new(@spec);
print "$p\n";
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't work if there is a matching pair in the second list, from what I can tell? –  gawbul Aug 10 '10 at 15:23
    
E.g. (104643,104837) (104891,104950) (104912,105195) (104964,105195) (106635,107245) (112029,112166) (113174,113177) (114546,114688) (114773,114940) (115057,115165) –  gawbul Aug 10 '10 at 15:24
    
Prints both out for the ones ending 105195! –  gawbul Aug 10 '10 at 15:24
    
@Steve: right. Missed part of the spec. Updating my answer completely. –  runrig Aug 10 '10 at 15:30
1  
+1 Good idea to use Set::IntSpan. You could create @spec a bit more easily with map(), along these lines: my @spec = map "$starts[$_]-$ends[$_]", 0 .. $#starts. –  FMc Aug 10 '10 at 16:47

Use some list transformations:

my @starts = (100,100,200,300,400,500,525);
my @ends   = (150,125,250,350,450,550,550);

my (%starts_seen, %ends_seen);
my @ar = sort { $a->[0] <=> $b->[0] }   # result in ascending sort order of @starts
         grep ! $starts_seen{$_->[0]}++,
         sort { $b->[0] <=> $a->[0] }   # descending sort b -> a
         grep ! $ends_seen{$_->[1]}++,
         sort { $b->[1] <=> $b->[1] }   # descending sort b -> a
         map  [ $starts[$_],$ends[$_] ],
         0 .. $#starts;

print "($_->[0],$_->[1]) " for @ar;

this results in:

(100,150) (200,250) (300,350) (400,450) (500,550) 

Regards

rbo

Edit: modified code to reflect sort order of sorts

share|improve this answer
    
How about if I wanted to get 100,150 as the first pair, so the pairs are always the largest ones? –  gawbul Aug 10 '10 at 15:46
    
Steve, you use in sort: {$a->[0] <=> $b->[0]} for ascending and $b->[0] <=> $a->[0]} for descending sort (I'll add a remark) –  rubber boots Aug 10 '10 at 16:02
    
It is slow and overcomplicated. Why you sort it three times? Compare poor man's solution in stackoverflow.com/questions/3449983/… –  Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Aug 10 '10 at 16:33
    
What if you had starts (500, 550) and ends (525, 560)...do we want to end up with just (500, 560)? This does not do that. –  runrig Aug 10 '10 at 16:38
    
runrig, right, this will not correctly handle int spans. This was not originally stated in the question - I read that (the span request) later in an additional post of the o.p. - –  rubber boots Aug 10 '10 at 17:20

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