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I'm writing some code to translate a C++ type to an appropriate type for a SQL DB. I want to identify the type, and then depending on what it is, produce the appropriate SQL code. I'm not sure exactly what can be done in this regard by using RTTI, auto, or decltype. I have some ideas but I'm not sure if they're workable.

For instance (I know the following may not be valid C++, I'm just trying to get the idea across):

if (decltype(some_var) == int) { do_stuff(); }

or

if (decltype(some_var) == decltype(1) { do_stuff(); }

or

switch(decltype(some_var)) {
    case int:
        do_int_stuff();
        break;
    case string;
        do_string_stuff();
        break;
    case bool;
        do_bool_stuff();
        break;
}

or

string get_func_y(int var) {
    ...
    return my_string;
}

string get_func_y(string var) {
    ...
    return my_string;
}

string get_func_y(bool var) {
    ...
    return my_string;
}

...
string SQL = get_func_y(some_var);

Any of this look like it would work, or does anyone have advice on how to go about this? Thanks ahead of time for any input you may have.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use a simple metaprogramming function to determine (at compile time) whether two types are the same:

template <typename T, typename U>
struct same_type 
{
   static const bool value = false;
};
template <typename T>
struct same_type< T, T >
{
   static const bool value = true;
};

Whether that actually helps you with your program or not is a different question. I would just go for the simple function overload solution.

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Both boost and C++0x standard library should have it (in type_traits: is_same) –  UncleBens Aug 10 '10 at 15:27
    
Hmm. Actually I think this would work almost exactly the way I wanted it to. It looks like an if(is_same<decltype(some_var), int>::value) { ... } would work. Doesn't work as part of a switch, but next best thing. I was pretty sure function overloading would work, but I wanted something that would be self-documenting and concise, as far as which types were handled. Thanks. –  Brett Rossier Aug 10 '10 at 16:30

Your last option of using simple function overloading should work fine.

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I kinda figured it would, but I was favoring the others because I felt it would give me better self-documentation in the code. I wanted to have a concise list of the types I was testing for, to make it obvious which ones were handled. It just seemed more intuitive to me that way. Guess it doesn't really matter, since a type that's not handled by an overloaded function should raise a compile-time error anyway. Thanks. –  Brett Rossier Aug 10 '10 at 16:01

In C++, variables and functions have static types. The only possible confusion, other than misusing casts, is whether a pointer to a base class is pointing to a base or some derived. This means that your decltypes are going to be useless as conditions (except for class derivation), since they will have a constant answer.

Overloaded functions work well with static typing. Use them.

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I figured using decltype that way wouldn't work, but interesting to know why. Thanks. –  Brett Rossier Aug 10 '10 at 16:02

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