Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

Which is the correct way of providing values to a abstract factory method?

Eg.

interface IFactory
{
  ISomething Create(int runTimeValue);
}

class Factory : IFactory
{
  public ISomething Create(int runTimeValue)
  {
    return new Something(repository, runTimeValue);
  }
}

In the example the repository is injected via the constructor when factory is created but I could instead move the repository to the IFactory interface

interface IFactory
{
  ISomething Create(IRepository repository, int runTimeValue);
}

class Factory : IFactory
{
  public ISomething Create(IRepository repository, int runTimeValue)
  {
    return new Something(repository, runTimeValue);
  }
}

What is considered "correct" way of doing this? How should one reason when designing an abstract factory?

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Abstract Factory pattern should be used in cases when the objects returned by the factory need to be "initialized" differently in such a way that only the factory knows how to do it. So different implementations of ISomething will be "initialized" or created differently and only their respective Factory implementations know how to do it.

In your case you have to ask yourself:

Do all implementations of ISomethings need the IRepository as well as runtimeValue?. In that case you can just use the factory pattern.

Use Abstract Factory in such a scenario: (Something and SomeOtherthing are created differently)

interface IFactory {
  ISomething Create(int runTimeValue);
}

class Factory : IFactory {
  public ISomething Create(int runTimeValue)  {
    return new Something(repository, runTimeValue);
  }
}

class OFactory : IFactory {
  public ISomething Create(int runTimeValue) {
    // constructor takes different parameters
    SomeOtherthing thing = new SomeOtherthing("someValue", runtimeValue);
    thing.SetCustomRepository(new OtherRepositoryImpl());
    return thing;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this helps :) – Marcus Aug 10 '10 at 16:55
    
how would you unit test this factory? OtherRepositoryImpl is a concrete implementation.... – danip Aug 12 '14 at 12:49

I'd say be consistent. If your repository is injected everywhere else that it is used, it would make sense to inject it into the factory's constructor rather than making it a part of the interface.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.