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Possible Duplicate:
How to find an item in a std::vector?

Is there something in algorithm.h which allows you to check if a std:: container contains something? Or a way to make one ex:

if(a.x == b.x && a.y == b.y)
return true;

return false;

can this only be done with std::map since it uses keys?

Thanks

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marked as duplicate by James Curran, Troubadour, Joe, GManNickG, Rob Kennedy Aug 10 '10 at 17:35

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
std::find...... – sje397 Aug 10 '10 at 15:54
    
If it contains something specific, or just of it's not empty? – James Curran Aug 10 '10 at 15:54
2  
Which C++ reference are you using? And the header is called <algorithm> - note no .h. – anon Aug 10 '10 at 15:54
    
Something specific such as a custom struct. – jmasterx Aug 10 '10 at 15:56
    
if the container contains a custom struct, then you'll need to implement operator== to compare them; then std::find will work. – Mike Seymour Aug 10 '10 at 16:13
up vote 208 down vote accepted

Checking if v contains the element x:

#include <algorithm>

if(std::find(v.begin(), v.end(), x) != v.end()) {
    /* v contains x */
} else {
    /* v does not contain x */
}

Checking if v contains elements (is non-empty):

if(!v.empty()){
    /* v is non-empty */
} else {
    /* v is empty */
}
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6  
what if x is the last element in v? – David Carpenter Dec 5 '12 at 1:38
19  
David, end() points to one past the last element, so it all works out. – Mark Beckwith Jan 14 '13 at 20:08
7  
@SideshowBob And now you destroyed the conversation log by deletion of your starting comment. How cool is that? – kirsche40 Mar 21 '14 at 15:58
1  
Does this account for numerical tolerance when trying to determine if a double is in the vector? – Nicholas Hamilton Aug 20 '15 at 7:18
2  
@NicholasHamilton: No, it uses operator==. If you need to account for numerical tolerance, use std::find_if and supply a suitable predicate. – You Aug 20 '15 at 18:38

If searching for an element is important, I'd recommend std::set instead of std::vector. Using this:

std::find(vec.begin(), vec.end(), x)

runs in O(n) time, but std::set has its own find() member (ie. myset.find(x)) which runs in O(log n) time - much more efficient with large numbers of elements.

std::set also guarantees all the added elements are unique, which saves you from having to do anything like 'if not contained then push_back()...`.

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Great!!! I'm writing a lexer. Sets will be much better than vectors. Does set have a count method like map? I also want to be able to get the index of the element in a set. – IAbstract Apr 3 '15 at 12:30
1  
Excellent information! Thank you for both answering the straight question and providing an additional solution. – JasonMc92 Jun 18 '15 at 3:10

See question: How to find an item in a std::vector?

You'll also need to ensure you've implemented a suitable operator==() for your object, if the default one isn't sufficient for a "deep" equality test.

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