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I'm reviewing some code for a friend and say that he was using a return statement inside of a try-finally block. Does the code in the Finally section still fire even though the rest of the try block doesn't?

Example:

public bool someMethod()
{
  try
  {
    return true;
    throw new Exception("test"); // doesn't seem to get executed
  }
  finally
  {
    //code in question
  }
}
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13  
I would have simply modified that method to write a message to the console and then tested it rather than asking a question on SO and waiting for a response. It's much less effort, the answer's immediate, and you're not cluttering up SO with questions that you can answer for yourself. –  Robert Rossney Dec 6 '08 at 19:55
55  
Personally I really appreciated seeing the question and answer, so that I could find it in a 15 second Google search. –  cdiggins Jan 2 '12 at 20:55

7 Answers 7

up vote 94 down vote accepted

Simple answer: Yes.

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Sometimes no in the case of background threads? –  Edi May 1 at 11:36

Normally, yes. The finally section is guaranteed to execute whatever happens including exceptions or return statement. An exception to this rule is an asynchronous exception happening on the thread (OutOfMemoryException, StackOverflowException).

To learn more about async exceptions and reliable code in that situations, read about constrained execution regions.

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17  
Yes, StackOverflow is always the exception... :) –  dalle Dec 5 '08 at 21:06
1  
+1 For mentioning exceptions. –  Andrew Hare Apr 16 '09 at 14:19
3  
Or a Power Failure Exception, something even the OS can't catch. –  Stephen Schrauger Oct 21 '13 at 15:49

Here's a little test:

class Class1
{
    [STAThread]
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("before");
        Console.WriteLine(test());
        Console.WriteLine("after");
    }

    static string test()
    {
        try
        {
            return "return";
        }
        finally
        {
            Console.WriteLine("finally");
        }
    }
}

The result is:

before

finally

return

after

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1  
Interesting, I wouldn't have thought that was the result –  CodeBlend Apr 12 '13 at 13:06
3  
@CodeBlend: It has to do with when the WriteLine for the result of the method call is actually performed. In this case the return call sets the methods result, finally writes to the console - before the method exits. Then the WriteLine in the Main method spits out the text from the return call. –  Chris Lively Sep 4 '13 at 1:24

Quoting from MSDN

finally is used to guarantee a statement block of code executes regardless of how the preceding try block is exited.

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1  
Well, in addition to Mehrdad's exceptional cases, finally also won't be called if you are debugging in a try block, and then stop debugging :). Nothing in life is guaranteed, it seems. –  StuartLC Aug 22 '12 at 16:24
    
@nonnb: Thats True :) –  Perpetualcoder Aug 22 '12 at 17:15

Generally yes, the finally will run.

For the following three scenarios, the finally will ALWAYS run:

  1. No exceptions occur.
  2. Synchronous exceptions (exceptions that occur in normal program flow) -- this includes CLS compliant exceptions that derive from System.Exception and non-CLS compliant exceptions, which do not derive from System.Exception. Non-CLS compliant exceptions are automatically wrapped by the RuntimeWrappedException. C# cannot throw non-CLS complaint exceptions, but languages such as C++ can. C# could be calling into code written in a language that can throw non-CLS compliant exceptions.
  3. Asynchronous ThreadAbortException. As of .NET 2.0, a ThreadAbortException will no longer prevent a finally from running. ThreadAbortException is now hoisted to before or after the finally. The finally will always run and will not be interrupted by a thread abort, so long as the try was actually entered before the thread abort occurred.

The following scenario, the finally will not run:

  1. Asynchronous StackOverflowException. As of .NET 2.0 a stack overflow will cause the process to terminate. The finally will not be run, unless a further constraint is applied to make the finally a CER (Constrained Execution Region). CERs should not be used in general user code. They should only be used where it is critical that clean-up code always run -- after all the process is shutting down on stack overflow anyway and all managed objects will therefore be cleaned-up by default. Thus, the only place a CER should be relevant is for resources that are allocated outside of the process, e.g., unmanaged handles. Typically, unmanaged code is wrapped by some managed class before being consumed by user code. The managed wrapper class will typically make use of a SafeHandle to wrap the unmanaged handle. The SafeHandle implements a critical finalizer, and a Release method that is run in a CER to guarantee the execution of the clean-up code. For this reason, you should not see CERs littered through-out user code. So the fact that the finally doesn't run on StackOverflowException should have no effect to user code, since the process will terminate anyway. If you have some edge case where you do need to clean-up some unmanaged resource, outside of a SafeHandle or CriticalFinalizerObject, then use a CER as follows; but please note, this is bad practice -- the unmanaged concept should be abstracted to a managed class(es) and appropriate SafeHandle(s) by design.
// No code can appear after this line, before the try
RuntimeHelpers.PrepareConstrainedRegions();
try
{ 
    // This is *NOT* a CER
}
finally
{
    // This is a CER; guaranteed to run, if the try was entered, even if a StackOverflowException occurs.
}

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Yes. That is in fact that main point of a finally statement. Unless something catestrophic occurs (out of memory, computer unplugged, etc.) the finally statement should always be executed.

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finally wont run in case if you are exiting from the application using System.exit(0); as in

try
{
    System.out.println("try");
    System.exit(0);
}
finally
{
   System.out.println("finally");
}

the result would be just : try

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