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A semaphore is a programming concept that is frequently used to solve multi-threading problems. My question to the community:

What is a semaphore and how do you use it?

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a boolean flag whose value is based on whether an integer counter has reached its designated upper limit. Obfuscation to the max! –  Sam Sep 19 '11 at 1:02
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11 Answers

Think of semaphores as bouncers at a nightclub. There are a dedicated number of people that are allowed in the club at once. If the club is full no one is allowed to enter, but as soon as one person leaves another person might enter.

It's simply a way to limit the number of consumers for a specific resource. For example, to limit the number of simultaneous calls to a database in an application.

Here is a very pedagogic example in C# :-)

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading;

namespace TheNightclub
{
    public class Program
    {
        public static Semaphore Bouncer { get; set; }

        public static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            // Create the semaphore with 3 slots, where 3 are available.
            Bouncer = new Semaphore(3, 3);

            // Open the nightclub.
            OpenNightclub();
        }

        public static void OpenNightclub()
        {
            for (int i = 1; i <= 50; i++)
            {
                // Let each guest enter on an own thread.
                Thread thread = new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(Guest));
                thread.Start(i);
            }
        }

        public static void Guest(object args)
        {
            // Wait to enter the nightclub (a semaphore to be released).
            Console.WriteLine("Guest {0} is waiting to entering nightclub.", args);
            Bouncer.WaitOne();          

            // Do some dancing.
            Console.WriteLine("Guest {0} is doing some dancing.", args);
            Thread.Sleep(500);

            // Let one guest out (release one semaphore).
            Console.WriteLine("Guest {0} is leaving the nightclub.", args);
            Bouncer.Release(1);
        }
    }
}
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4  
one upvote for comapring bouncers of nightclub with Semaphore –  Duraiamuthan Feb 15 at 7:51
    
Yes, the bouncer analogy is epic! –  Mike Caron Mar 7 at 13:05
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Good article on Mutex's and Semaphores - what makes them different, and why they might or might not be used given various conditions.

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Can I up-vote this twice? That article clearly and concisely spelled out the difference between Mutex's and Semaphores... concepts that had always been explained to me with very mirky distinctions. Thanks! –  embedded_guy Jan 19 '12 at 23:54
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Mutex: exclusive-member access to a resource

Semaphore: n-member access to a resource

That is, a mutex can be used to syncronize access to a counter, file, database, etc.

A sempahore can do the same thing but supports a fixed number of simultaneous callers. For example, I can wrap my database calls in a semaphore(3) so that my multithreaded app will hit the database with at most 3 simultaneous connections. All attempts will block until one of the three slots opens up. They make things like doing naive throttling really, really easy.

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According to Richard W. Stevens, a mutex is actually a binary semaphore, with only two possible values: 0 and 1. –  Qiang Xu Oct 12 '12 at 21:14
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@Craig:

A semaphore is a way to lock a resource so that it is guaranteed that while a piece of code is executed, only this piece of code has access to that resource. This keeps two threads from concurrently accesing a resource, which can cause problems.

This is not restricted to only one thread. A semaphore can be configured to allow a fixed number of threads to access a resource.

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This is a commentary, not an answer. –  gg.kaspersky May 19 '13 at 17:15
    
Yeah, but I think I wrote this before comments got added to Stack Overflow. Or I didn't, don't really remember. This time I answered in a comment though. :-) –  Mats Fredriksson Sep 15 '13 at 21:36
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Semaphore can also be used as a ... semaphore. For example if you have multiple process enqueuing data to a queue, and only one task consuming data from the queue. If you don't want your consuming task to constantly poll the queue for available data, you can use semaphore.

Here the semaphore is not used as an exclusion mechanism, but as a signaling mechanism. The consuming task is waiting on the semaphore The producing task are posting on the semaphore.

This way the consuming task is running when and only when there is data to be dequeued

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A semaphore is an object containing a natural number (i.e. a integer greater or equal to zero) on which two modifying operations are defined. One operation, V, adds 1 to the natural. The other operation, P, decreases the natural number by 1. Both activities are atomic (i.e. no other operation can be executed at the same time as a V or a P).

Because the natural number 0 cannot be decreased, calling P on a semaphore containing a 0 will block the execution of the calling process(/thread) until some moment at which the number is no longer 0 and P can be successfully (and atomically) executed.

As mentioned in other answers, semaphores can be used to restrict access to a certain resource to a maximum (but variable) number of processes.

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A hardware or software flag. In multi tasking systems , a semaphore is as variable with a value that indicates the status of a common resource.A process needing the resource checks the semaphore to determine the resources status and then decides how to proceed.

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQFJQJGmixM Should give you basic idea of semaphore and mutes. it explains the concept in simplified terms.

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Could you, perhaps, expand on this answer a bit? It's a bit... lacking for the breadth of the question. –  Emracool Jan 13 '13 at 23:38
    
It would help if you gave a summary of the 8 minute video in your answer, unless your aim is to get people to watch the video... –  assylias Jan 14 '13 at 7:51
    
The video explains the concept in a more simple way. It relates it to more on a day to day concept which makes understanding easy. I have no intention that people watch this video. I am not being paid by the guy who made it. Watch it if you want else who cares. I found its easy for me to understand so gave the link. –  Vijay Jan 21 '13 at 23:43
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A semaphore is a way to lock a resource so that it is guaranteed that while a piece of code is executed, only this piece of code has access to that resource. This keeps two threads from concurrently accesing a resource, which can cause problems.

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sounds like a mutex not a semaphore –  Sam Sep 19 '11 at 0:57
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This is an old question but one of the most interesting uses of semaphore is a read/write lock and it has not been explicitly mentioned.

The r/w locks works in simple fashion: consume one permit for a reader and all permits for writers. Indeed, a trivial implementation of a r/w lock but requires metadata modification on read (actually twice) that can become a bottle neck, still significantly better than a mutex or lock.

Another downside is that writers can be started rather easily as well unless the semaphore is a fair one or the writes acquire permits in multiple requests, in such case they need an explicit mutex between themselves.

Further read:

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So imagine everyone is trying to go to the bathroom and there's only a certain number of keys to the bathroom. Now if there's not enough keys left, that person needs to wait. So think of semaphore as representing those set of keys available for bathrooms (the system resources) that different processes (bathroom goers) can request access to.

Now imagine two processes trying to go to the bathroom at the same time. That's not a good situation and semaphores are used to prevent this. Unfortunately, the semaphore is a voluntary mechanism and processes (our bathroom goers) can ignore it (i.e. even if there are keys, someone can still just kick the door open).

There are also differences between binary/mutex & counting semaphores.

Check out the lecture notes at http://www.cs.columbia.edu/~jae/4118/lect/L05-ipc.html.

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